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Airtex Fuel Pumps - Buyer Beware


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MT-2500
12-07-2010, 12:03 PM
Thought I would add my own experience with an Airtex pump, though my vehicle is a Dodge Caravan, not a Chevy Blazer.

About a week ago I had to change out the fuel pump (original) after 120k miles; pump still worked fine, but had developed a small crack in the out-going port that had a nasty habit of spraying fuel towards the exhaust pipe. Anyway, I got a replacement Airtex pump from O'reilly, and put it in with a new fuel filter. The new pump had a bad check valve out of the box and wouldn't hold pressure when the car was shut off... of course having just replaced it I tore the rest of the engine apart to check the fuel rail and injectors before coming to that realization. Unfortunately I've just put another Airtex in the tank I got from the warranty... this one works so far; does run about 2 PSI higher than it should, but at least the check valve is working for the moment. I just wonder how long it will be before this one dies. I wonder if O'reilly will refund the cost of this piece of junk so I can buy an OEM (90 bucks more and not typically in stock)

If you look in the airtex box they always put a warranty claim sticker in every new airtex pump.

I would say they are thinking a head on them going bad and you having to replace them.:rofl::lol2::grinno:
Also on a side note my Iespell checker says to spell Airtex as Cortex.:lol2:

They may not refund unless it goes bad.


But if it does they do have Delphi oem type pumps for about 25$ more and may have to be ordered.

But bad news is Delphi does not make pump for some flex fuel dodge caravan.
What year and engine caravan and is it flex fuel?

Rick Norwood
12-13-2010, 08:04 PM
I just wonder how long it will be before this one dies. I wonder if O'reilly will refund the cost of this piece of junk so I can buy an OEM (90 bucks more and not typically in stock)

Well if the Airtex pumps for Dodge/Chrysler are the same as for GM, you can almost bet on less than a year of service. Your fuel gage will probably go bad first, then you will notice the engine getting harder and harder to start, slightly at first, then progressively worse. If your internal fuel pump bearings don't start howling like a banshee, or the internal hose don't split, a year is about average. OEM pumps average $25 - $50 more and O'Reilly's might just work something out with you.

To prolong the life of your existing piece of crap Airtex Pump, ALWAYS keep your fuel level above a quarter full, and change your fuel filter twice a year.

Here is another thought, there is no way for the counter guy at O'Reilly's to tell if the pump is bad or not. So if you feel froggy, you can yank the Airtex P.O.S. and return it and put on your best Pissed off face and pay the little extra and demand a new OEM, Swearing off the Airtex crap.

Here is the way I see it, Airtex brags that we're a bunch of idiots that yank their perfectly good pieces of crap fuel pumps, claiming that the returned pumps meet all standards when they re-test them at their factory (at least 50% of them anyway). Well, I'd be inclined to give their statistics a little boost, and return their garbage pump BEFORE it leaves you stranded. Don't wait until it is out of warranty. They don't care, they expect it, other wise they wouldn't put the return label in the box like MT2500 says.

wolfie251961
10-21-2011, 10:44 AM
So we put a new Airtex fuel pump assembly in my son's Jeep. Ran great for a week. He went to start it and saw smoke coming from under the hood. The lead from the starter relay to the fuel pump was heating up. After an intense search for the short, we were led back to the fuel pump. When we removed it we found that the hot lead to the pump was shorting against the pump frame. A terrible design flaw. The insulation on the hot lead had heated to the point that it bubbled. We found that the connector rubbed against the pump frame until it made contact. Fortunately there was no spark or this could have turned bad real quick!

BTW....the Carter direct fit pump is far from a direct fit!!! Where has quality gone?

Turbo_Diesel
02-13-2012, 05:12 AM
Ok... Well here's my 2 cents on this topic - take this for what it's worth... I read so many bad things about Airtex, bought a Bosch instead.

Truck is a 1998 Chevy K1500 (4X4, 1/2 ton) with the 4.3L V-6. Ok, so the Bosch fuel pump module assy was something like $333 at Advance Auto Parts. OUCH! Bought it online, used a coupon code, and saved an additional $50 bucks from the price, bringing it to about the same price as what the Airtex pump's regular price was at Advance. (Still a rip-off if you ask me.)

Got the Bosch pump, took the "failed" (but, not really - more on that later) Carter pump module out of the tank (which BTW, looked just like an Airtex). Bosch fuel pump module looks similar, yet the more you look at it, it's actually quite a bit different.

Anyhow, first problem... the Bosch has a totally different connector than the OEM plug, Airtex plug, and Carter plug!!! The OEM was (for better lack of description) a "flat 4" pin configuration weatherpack connector. The Bosch module uses a "stacked 2-by-2" 4-pin configuration!!! That's great, since there's NOT a pigtail harness in the box, and apparently these pumps DON'T come with them???? Well, I gotta look into it more, b/c I think I got screwed by the auto parts store and should have gotten the correct pigtail harness included with the pump.

Anyhow, I was able to remove the female end of the weatherpack connector from the new pump by just simply prying it out of the top of the module. They just "snap" into place in the top of the module, and are held in place by an o-ring seal. Wow, I was pleasantly surprised and that was easy! Next, I removed the "original" 2 small wires for the fuel tank level sending unit with a paper clip, re-bent the connector retaining tangs, and re-installed them to the original OEM/Airtex/Carter designed female connector that I just swapped over from the old pump to the new one.

The actual fuel pump's positive and ground weren't quite so easy. They required a quick cut and butt-splice of each wire, due to different sized connectors used in the Bosch's 2-by-2 weatherpack. The OEM connectors were smaller, and the Bosch's were larger. So, that was a fricken Pain In The Ass, but not the end of the world.

Out of habit, I was at first a little concerned about "sealing" the butt-splice connections, but then soon realized that it really doesn't matter, since gasoline LIQUID is not flammable, and only a few inches up from my splice job, there are original bare spade terminal connectors at the pump itself anyhow.

I'm betting the smaller connectors found in the OEM flat 4 weatherpack plug are the source of the overheating and melting problem that is associated with these fuel pump connectors!!! This would be due to the fact that the gauge of the wiring (connector) is too small, thus leading to too high of resistance, and then the pump connector starts to melt. Just a thought.

I'll probably be back in here doing this again anyhow one day (god, I hope not). If so, the next time I'll be getting the correct Bosch pigtail connector one way or another, cutting and splicing the female connector back into the original Bosch setup, and putting the 2-by-2 connector back in place. (Let's hope I don't have to though.)

Regardless, I put the OEM connector back together, as I didn't have much other choice - as remember, I received no "truck-side" weatherpack 2-by-2 pigtail to go with the new Bosch unit.

Apparently, my OEM male pigtail connector had been replaced once, as it was already spliced into the main harness up about 6 inches or so. As previously stated, it was still the OEM flat 4 that was failure prone. Great. (Sense my sarcasm?)

Anyhow, with all that said, I put the pump in, put everything back together, and voila - almost NO pump pressure! In fact, even less than the Carter pump was putting out, as I checked it prior to removal, and it was doing about 20 psi. My new Bosch was doing roughly 10 psi! WTF?!?!

Ok, so get this... after a day of letting this go and stewing about this, I finally was able to figure out the problem. There was something eating at me about this whole thing, and also about how the pump originally failed. It didn't just stop, the truck died a bunch of times, and re-started each time. About a dozen or so, to be more precise... all in one day, while plowing snow. It finally just quit as the truck was being backed into my driveway at the end of the day. (How "lucky" was that?!)

Anyhow, back to what REALLY caused my fuel pump to fail. A BAD GROUND! YEAH, A BAD GROUND!!!! I was suspecting that all along! So guess what, my Carter fuel pump was FINE all along - Damnit!

One thing I noticed was that the stupid annoying door chime/beeper/buzzer thingy kept going off in the cab whenever I jumpered the fuel pump relay to make the pump run. Now, I KNOW that this was not normal, but I couldn't explain why it was doing it, so I didn't worry about it. Again, more on that coming up...

So I've got the Bosch pump in my tank, I have the fuel pump relay jumpered, and the pump is pumping about 10 psi. Shit. The stupid door chime beeper is sounding. WTF?!... Now what? Well, I noticed that the tail lights of the truck were on. Yep, JUST THE TAILLIGHTS, nothing else. Huh... WTF?! So, I went to the rear of the truck and disconnected the weatherpack connector to the tail lights. Guess what happened? The beeper stopped beeping, and the fuel pump stopped pumping! Ok, well that makes both NO sense, and yet, PERFECT sense! I just found my issue, and as previously stated, IT'S a BAD GROUND! The pump was getting it's ground by somehow backfeeding through my taillight circuit! Yeay!

I looked and looked and looked to try to figure out where the heck the ground wire went from the pump. Never did figure out to where it goes exactly, other than I do know it goes ultimately to a frame ground somewhere. The schematic in my somewhat "worthless" Haynes shop manual wasn't really much help.

Anyhow, the quick fix would have been to take the tank back down, cut the ground wire to the pump, splice a new wire to it, run it all the way up the frame rail to the negative on the battery, and be over it. BUT, I'm a friggen "anal perfectionist" and that wasn't going to suit me. I wanted to know what the hell was wrong with the frame ground, and more importantly, WHERE it was.

Needless to say, I kept searching... and I finally found it - well I'll be a son of a gun!

On the TOP of the RIGHT frame rail, up front, near the RIGHT FRONT wheel, just to the rear of the upper control arm (a-arm) of the front suspension there is a 5/16" self-tapping cap screw (bolt) that has 2 ground wires attached to it. They are the "bare" flat webbing mesh type ground wires, and are dinky trash. One goes from the frame to the sheet metal inner fender, and the other goes up behind the starter, under the RH exhaust manifold, and to the back of the engine somewhere (I think to a bolt on the back of the RH cylinder head).

My solution: Removed the 5/16" cap screw. (Uses a 1/2 socket or wrench.) Amazingly, it came right out, despite it looking like it was a rotted mess. I got a new bolt, cleaned up the frame rail rust with my die grinder and 2" surface grinding wheel (coarse 80 grit sand paper type) and installed a new ground wire. For $20 bucks, I bought a 5 foot long, 4 gauge ground wire with 3/8" eyelets on either end from my local Nu-Way Auto Parts store. Get the 5 footer, it's a smart choice.

Bolted it to the original grounding location on the RH frame rail with a new bolt, and coated it with grease to prevent any future rust and corrosion issues. Ran the new ground cable up the top of the frame rail, and zip-tied it to the existing wiring that is there for the starter cables and whatnot. Continued to run it up near the battery, and then looped it back to a 3/8" x 3/4" long brand new bolt that I installed to a perfect spot on a threaded hole on the lower backside of the alternator mounting bracket. MINT!

Turned the key on, and I got 62 psi out of my new Bosch fuel pump. Sweet.

Desired fuel pump pressure is supposed to be about 60-65 psi on these pumps.

Problem solved, truck starts and runs great.

Jerry80871852
02-13-2012, 01:42 PM
Amazing what a little determination & effort will do for a person that hunting a problem. Congratulations of finding & fixing the problem& not giving up.

old_master
02-13-2012, 02:52 PM
Wow, what a fiasco! Glad you found it. Just a couple of things to keep in mind when diagnosing low fuel pressure.... Always check voltage drop at the pump harness connector along with checking resistance of the ground wire, as part of your diagnosis before you condem the pump. High resistance in the pump circuits will kill a pump prematurely. The heavy duty body ground you installed was a great idea, that's what caused the issues with the door chime and taillights, and more than likely other things as well. The actual fuel pump ground goes to the vehicle frame fairly close to the tank, and ultimately goes through your new ground wire.

As for the pump connectors:

http://i561.photobucket.com/albums/ss58/cwhook/HarnessConnectors.jpg

Almost all fuel pumps, even the cheezy aftermarket ones, (no name, Carter, Bosch, Airtex etc) should come with the new style connector in the box. The connector pigtail should always be soldered to the vehicle harness using rosin core solder and heat shrink tubing to insulate it. Crimp style connectors should never be used anywhere on a vehicle... corrosion will work its way between the wire and the insulation causing more problems.

DeltaP
02-13-2012, 04:30 PM
I've had the heads up on Airtex pumps for quite some time now so luckily I haven't installed any but I have replaced a few. They were reportedly 6 months to a year old. My local supplier wont carry them either as this problem has been going on for some years now and he says Airtex is in denial over their pumps. I've had the same problem with Napa pumps. I'd like to know who makes them. Never had a problem with AC Delco's. And as was said the tank is always full when they fail!

Rick Norwood
02-13-2012, 05:33 PM
Turbo-Diesel, Great Job! A big thanks for sharing, and above all else for listening and not buying the Airtex junk.

Turbo_Diesel
02-17-2012, 02:53 AM
@ old_master:
Listen, I hear ya on the soldering... really, I do. And, on rare occassion, I break out my soldering iron and such. However, I don't have time for all that nonsense most of the time.

I own a very good set of Gardner-Bender crimp tools (not the cheap crap most people have that just crush the connector flat at the crimp - those things are garbage), and I have never had any problems with a properly crimped butt-splice connection that has been correctly sealed up. Problem is, most people never do PROPER crimp connections, nor do they seal them up either.
Yes, you definitely still have to heat shrink wrap them after crimping them if they are exposed to the elements. If inside, such as in the cab/interior of a vehicle, well, it's really not critical to shrink wrap 'em.

I no longer use the expensive connectors that come with the shrink wrap already on them. You just ruin the shrink wrap when you crimp them, so they are pointless and very pricey. I've found that it's best to buy the shrink tubing at length, and cut it to fit your own for each wire crimp job. The hardest part is getting yourself into the habit of always putting the tubing over the wire BEFORE you crimp a new connector in place. :lol: LOL


BTW guys... I found that the "2-by-2 stacked" 4-pin connector, apparently the OEM original for my truck's fuel pump, IS still available. That also explains why my new Bosch fuel pump module came with that OEM style female connector on it, and no additional pigtail in the box, like most other pumps have included. Apparently every other manufacturer has switched to the new style "flat-4" plug harness, except Bosch?!

It sure would have been nice if ANYBODY would have told me about these things, but parts store guys nowadays are all pretty much just know-nothing counter-monkeys. I don't entirely blame them though. I more place the blame on the parts industry as a whole for not hiring good people, TRAINING them for the long haul, and then retaining them (by paying them well enough) for years to come.
It's really a sad world we live in nowadays. Any random dumbass works in a parts store now, and if they can scan your item's bar code and sell it to you - they're hired (for minimum wage). Looking up certain parts can turn into a fiasco... if it isn't in that magical box (we call it a computer), most of them can't (or won't) help you find what you need - as they're just too damned dense. But, I digress... Sorry for getting off topic.

So, back on topic:

In case you ever need to buy the truck-side fuel pump weather pack connectors:

The "OLD STYLE" factory OEM, 2-by-2, 4-pin CONNECTOR is a ACDelco P/N: PT2054 (GM P/N: 88988598)
They are stupid expensive, plan on shelling out around $50 bucks for one.
Oh, and a bit of interesting info on this connector is that they are also used with some Oxygen Sensors. This is good to know for obtaining used ones if need be!

The "NEWER STYLE", flat-4, 4-pin CONNECTOR is a heckuva lot cheaper, at only $12.99 at Advance Auto Parts. Comes with crimp-on connectors. Granted, it's an Airtex branded part. I looked at one, and it seems to be of decent enough quality to do its job well. The P/N is: WH3009.

Either way, don't forget your heat shrink wrap tubing and your good quality electrical tape!

Oh, and just to repeat application info... The truck I'm dealing with is a 1998 Chevy K1500 (1/2 ton 4x4) with the 4.3L V-6 engine. Odds are, this fuel pump fits a plethora of other Chevy's - I'm sure of that.

Rick Norwood
02-17-2012, 12:38 PM
From what I understand, the original 2x2 connectors were causing numerous problems even back on the original OEM Fuel pumps, and the flat 4 pin connectors were reported to be the GM fix. I am sure someone could even find the GM Service bulletins. That is why most all of the aftermarket pumps have now gone to the flat connector.

In any case, as you stated, most people don't invest in the good crimping tools or the good crimps. If you have these and they work for you, that is fantastic, however for the rest of us, Old Master is right on the soldering/heatshrink technique.

Jerry80871852
02-17-2012, 01:48 PM
OldMaster is correct, but few their be that like to do things the correct way. Many times they will get by with it, & that is OK, that is if they’re doing it on their own cars, & not being paid to fix a customers car. Customers cars should always be done the right way, & if you can't or refuse to do it the right way you should not take the job.

I recall several incident much like this in my truck driving days. One of them I was headed to the West Coast. Before pulling out of the year my alternator went out. I pulled into the shop & they replaced it. I pulled out that morning & all was well, that is till early the next morning, my lights started to go dim & the alternator was not putting out. I stopped in a shop out west of Tucson. The mechanic quickly found the problem. One of the ends had broken off while our mechanic changed the alternator out, he quickly crimped on a new connection, yet he did not do it properly, & this connection had burned out the new alternator. It worked for a while.

It would not have taken him over 5 minutes longer to do it the right way & we would not have burned out a new alternator & had a big shop bill in Arizona.

It always pays to do the job properly. Sometimes when the job is done sloppy, unlike me that early morning, you may not make it to a shop, but your left broken down in the middle of no where. And I know of several people that have been there, with them saying, “If I had only took a few more minutes doing the job properly.”

Some never learn.

old_master
02-17-2012, 02:23 PM
The main problem is the circuit was designed to use 18ga wire to supply the pump with amperage and ground. By itself, that's not a problem, but the contact surface of the terminals is so small, they can't supply the necessary amperage and ground to the pump. As a result, they overheat and melt the plastic connector, ultimately causing the terminals to pull away from each other and lose contact. The flat 4 jobbies use 14ga wire and the 14ga terminals have a larger surface area, a much better choice. However, if the splice connection to the vehicle harness is poor, all you've done is move the problem area from the plastic connector back to the splice.

j cAT
02-18-2012, 11:35 AM
any EXTERIOR wires that are cut/spliced need be soldered and then using heat shrink tubing to protect the joint from chemical attack. you live where they use road de-icing you learn this quickly.

using crimp style lugs are good on the vehicle interior still using heat shrink to cover the joint protects the wire from damage and short circuits. then theres liquid tape. good product to make absolutely sure its sealed from chemicals.

ALARM installers use the wrong wire fasteners . these corrode and cause the wires to fail from overheating due to poor conduction of the fasteners they use.

when any power circuit is spliced like starters or alternators with high current these need be spliced and soldered. the wires must be cleaned properly and tinned before soldering. then protected with shrink tubing and tape .

Rick Norwood
02-18-2012, 02:25 PM
You are dead on right. The better the connection the lower the resistance, while the poorer the conection, the higher the resistance and more chance of melting, fire, fuse blowing, component failure, and all around general mayhem.

Leadhead
04-03-2012, 04:02 PM
I have a '98 Suburan with the 6.5 diesel. The fuel pump went out on it a while back, so I went and bought a replacement--an AirTex. This particular filter mounts on the frame rail and is easy to access, fortunately. After installing it, I primed the system and took it for a test drive. The truck died less than a mile down the road. After re-priming the fuel system I started it and.....died less than a mile down the road. Sometimes it would actually make it a full mile if lucky. It would idle in the driveway for 30 minutes, but as soon as it was under a load it would starve within a mile. I took it back to OhReally?'s, got it replaced under warranty and installed the new one. The truck started and ran, but had a "miss" when under a load. The next day we drove to church, 35 miles away and it made it all the way there, then 5 or 6 miles to our friends' home for Sunday dinner. On the 5 or 6 mile trip back to church in the evening it died twice but started again after a few minutes. When leaving church to go home it started but died before even pulling out of the parking spot. Long story short, it died several more times on the way home before finally curling up its toes for good. I tried to prime the fuel system but it had minimal pressure coming from the purge valve. After doing so the truck did start but died after idling for maybe 10-20 seconds. Looks like I get to take this one back for another one AGAIN.

Rick Norwood
04-03-2012, 04:16 PM
O.K. here is what you do. Take the AIRTEX PIECE OF CRAP back to the parts store, put on your best pissed off face, and demand a new pump only this time, tell them you will not accept another AIRTEX PIECE OF CRAP, and you are willing to pay the difference for an AC-Delco. If they don't have AC-Delco, get your money back an go somewhere else and buy/order one.

MT-2500
04-03-2012, 06:04 PM
I have a '98 Suburan with the 6.5 diesel. The fuel pump went out on it a while back, so I went and bought a replacement--an AirTex. This particular filter mounts on the frame rail and is easy to access, fortunately. After installing it, I primed the system and took it for a test drive. The truck died less than a mile down the road. After re-priming the fuel system I started it and.....died less than a mile down the road. Sometimes it would actually make it a full mile if lucky. It would idle in the driveway for 30 minutes, but as soon as it was under a load it would starve within a mile. I took it back to OhReally?'s, got it replaced under warranty and installed the new one. The truck started and ran, but had a "miss" when under a load. The next day we drove to church, 35 miles away and it made it all the way there, then 5 or 6 miles to our friends' home for Sunday dinner. On the 5 or 6 mile trip back to church in the evening it died twice but started again after a few minutes. When leaving church to go home it started but died before even pulling out of the parking spot. Long story short, it died several more times on the way home before finally curling up its toes for good. I tried to prime the fuel system but it had minimal pressure coming from the purge valve. After doing so the truck did start but died after idling for maybe 10-20 seconds. Looks like I get to take this one back for another one AGAIN.

Do not take it back and get another junk one.

Pitch it back over the counter at who ever sold to you and tell them you want a good Ac-delco/delphi pump and labor and pain at no charge and renbersement for all of the trouble the air tex pump gave you.

Let us know how that goes.

Rick Norwood
08-10-2012, 10:20 AM
Here is another update. Within a day or so, It will be exactly two years since I removed the Airtex PIECE OF CRAP pump from my 2000 Jimmy SLE and replaced it with an AC Delco pump. I am only too happy to report that I have not had 1 single issue with the AC Delco pump. The Gas Gauge sending unit is working perfectly and the truck primes and starts every time.

I cannot emphasize enough the importance of changing your Fuel Filter a minimum of once a year. AND ABOVE ALL ELSE STAY AWAY FROM AFTERMARKET AIRTEX GARBAGE PUMPS. You'll thank me in the long run.

SurfBeat
08-12-2012, 08:14 PM
On June 10, 2010 my OEM GM fuel pump went bad, so, off to Auto Zone I went to purchase a replacement.

The salesman told me that the Airtech was the way to go, plus it was cheaper (I can't remember how much cheaper) so I bought it, pulled the tank and replaced the OEM fuel pump.

In February I began hearing a hissing sound from underneath the car, then my gas gauge started acting like a windshield washer when the tank fell below 1/2.

A few days ago I had to hit the ignition a couple times to cranks my car over, so, off to AZ I went to get a replacement. The manager agreed to give me a 15% discount on another Airtech.

Because my mechanic friend told me to only use a Delphi fuel pump if I don't want to have problems again I told him I wanted a Delphi. He gave me the same discount. Here goes another $225 and 3 three hours of work.

On a side note my mechanic friend told me that he installed a 4USA fuel pump he got from ebay for $50 on a customers car a few years ago and it was still working.

I went on ebay to check it out and although I am a thrifty guy, thus I would like saving a few hundred bucks on this purchase, because I know it was a pain in the @$$ to replace the Airtech, I think I will follow Rick's advice and go for the Delphi.

I enjoy going to the Colorado River in the summer and breaking down in the desert is something I do not want to experience.

SurfBeat
08-12-2012, 08:49 PM
Let me clarify my last post.

On June 10, 2010 I replaced my Delphi fuel pump for one manufactured by Airtech.

The following year, around November or December of 2011 I began hearing a hissing sound from underneath my car (below the drivers seat) when I cranked it over. I am not a mechanic, however, I just had a feeling the nosie was the result of the fuel pump. (It was not the fuel filter which islocated directly under the door.

Around the first part of February 2012 I noticed the fuel gauge began imitating a windshield washer, erratically bobbing and weaving from left to right when the gas tank's contents was below full.

A few days ago, the beginning of August 2012 I noticed, on occasion, it took a few cranks to start my car, them a few days ago, August 10, 2012, it began acting exactly the way it did prior to replacing my fuel pump: having to prime the pump for a few seconds to get it to start.

Today, on a whim I logged onto ebay to check out fuel pumps and to my surprise I saw dozens priced from $45 to $89. Boy was I happy. Then, when I started to read the Feedback, although there were many, many more happy campers than un-happy ones, I paused and thought: Joey G, do you really think the Chinese can make a good product, one that will last? Just go to Chink-Mart to see the inferior quality of Chinese products.

I then decided to check out complaints about AirTech fuel pumps and came across this Board.

Without doubt, saving a few hundred bucks is very appealing to me to this thrifty guy who always wants to save a buck, however, because I have better things to do than spend 3-4 hours replacing a fuel pump, I've decided to follow Rick's advice, go for the Delphi and take my time to register this unhappy AirTech customer's opinion.

Based upon the complaints registered on this Board, my inauspicious experience with AirTech fuel pumps is not isolated, but quite common.

Instead of goofing off tomorrow as planned, I will be off to Auto Zone to purchase a Delphi fuel pump; jacking the rear of my car up and dropping the gas tank. That is BS.

Rick Norwood
08-13-2012, 08:20 AM
Thanks for sharing Surfbeat. I wish more people would surf for answers BEFORE buying Airtex Sh*t pumps.

SurfBeat
08-13-2012, 02:20 PM
Another amendment to my previous post: 1) Even with the ten per-cent discount that Auto Zone was going to give me on a replacement Airtech or Delphi fuel pump to keep me a happy customer; 2) even considering my mechanic friend's statement that he put an e-bay bought 4USA brand fuel filter in a customers car two years ago and it is still working fine; 3) when considering the info on this Thread; and 4) my mechanic friend's advice to only use a Delphi fuel pump in a Blazer type vehicle, which includes GMC Jimmy's and Olds Bravada's, I decided to purchase a Delphi on Amazon yesterday at a cost of only $175.00

That is a big savings over AZ and less than an Airtech, though at least three times more expensive than the Chinese made fuel pumps hawked on e-bay.

I have better things to do with my time than dropping fuel tanks every year or so, so, I will dish out the extra moola.

On a side note, the manager at AZ told me on Saturday he replaced his fuel pump with an Airtech a couple years ago and had not experienced any problems.

Today when I went to purchase some anti freeze he told me his fuel pump may be giving him problems; fuel gauge bobbin and weaving.

That's all folks.

Rick Norwood
08-13-2012, 02:53 PM
You will not go wrong with the AC/Delco Delphi pump.

I have been told by Parts Store Counter help all of the following (and it is ALL BullSh*t):

1, We never get returns on AirTex Pumps. (Big Lie)
2, You're the first guy to EVER return an Airtex Pump. (Bigger Lie)
3, I've had an Airtex Pump in my Truck for xx Years with no trouble. (Got Lucky or another lie)
4, Almost half of the returned pumps have nothing wrong with them. (Sales pitch propaganda = More lies)
5, I get more returns on other pumps including AC Delco than Airtex. (not BS, this is Horsesh*t)

j cAT
08-13-2012, 04:39 PM
all the part stores will tell you that airtex is the greatest. even with the warantee being lifetime who wants to deal with unreliable parts.

make sure that delphi pump is not a chinese clone.

I was lucky with a hub bearing made in china that just before the 2yr warantee ended it suddenly broke. vehicle/abs would not make the brakes work. I then replaced with a timken for 2X the cost and got my 90.oo back on that chinese piece of crap.

abs / bearings now work like new.

Rick Norwood
08-15-2012, 01:32 PM
Airtex started a lifetime guarantee on their garbage pumps? Oh Boy, that's a hoot!

The PARTS STORES in all likelihood won't honor it. After about 6 months, they'll almost all tell you to go pound sand. I wonder if they're gonna pay for labor too?

DON'T BE FOOLED! STAY AWAY FROM THEIR PROPAGANDA AND THEIR GARBAGE PUMPS.

Rick Norwood
08-15-2012, 01:45 PM
Here's the thing about guarantees and warranties.

Remember the old ... "OR YOUR MONEY BACK" line?

You can sell ANYTHING TO ANYONE as long as you say "OR YOUR MONEY BACK". Snake Oil, Copper Wrist Bands, Magnets for your feet, Diet Plans, Airtex Fuel Pumps anything.

Don't forget, the labor, either time or money, and the inconvenience of repeatedly being without your vehicle.

SurfBeat
08-15-2012, 02:32 PM
I ordered a Delphi fuel pump on Amazon from Partsfactor out of Phonenix, AZ on Sunday, and it arrived Tuesday morning. The cost: $175.00. I am going to drop the gas tank on Friday and toss out the inferior Airtex. Partsfactor had a 95% approval rating and from all appearances, the Delphi does not look like a clone.

Auto Zone and O'Reilly's wanted $365.00 plus tax for the same product and by investing an hours worth of time on Sunday to research different sellers and products on ebay (most were peddling fuel pumps made in China for about $45-$89, then popping over to Amazon, I got what I was looking for; a good, reliable pump at a great cost.

Learn from my research and Norwood, just buy a Delphi for the best price you can find.

j cAT
08-15-2012, 03:44 PM
I ordered a Delphi fuel pump on Amazon from Partsfactor out of Phonenix, AZ on Sunday, and it arrived Tuesday morning. The cost: $175.00. I am going to drop the gas tank on Friday and toss out the inferior Airtex. Partsfactor had a 95% approval rating and from all appearances, the Delphi does not look like a clone.

Auto Zone and O'Reilly's wanted $365.00 plus tax for the same product and by investing an hours worth of time on Sunday to research different sellers and products on ebay (most were peddling fuel pumps made in China for about $45-$89, then popping over to Amazon, I got what I was looking for; a good, reliable pump at a great cost.

Learn from my research and Norwood, just buy a Delphi for the best price you can find.

thanks for the supplier/price info

SurfBeat
08-15-2012, 07:08 PM
I found Partsfactor on Amazon, but they may have a web-site on the Internet apart from Amazon????

The label on the shipping box was: Pro Parts, 2215 W. Fillmore Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85009

I don't remember if there was a phone number on the Amazon ad. I do recall the item was being sold for $188 plus shipping and Amazon gave a $30 rebate. I jumped on it.

When I checked ebay there was a myriad of Blazer/Jimmy/Bravada fuel pumps for sale at real cheap prices, $49 to $89 and albeit a mechanic friend told me he installed the fuel pump he bought from the company"4USA" (on ebay) on a customer's car two years ago and had not received any negative feedback thus far, I was not going to take the chance of buying a product made in China and then have to worry about spending another morning dropping the gas tank to replace another defective fuel pump. Once is enough.

Doing the task is not difficult, it si just a PIA.

Good luck.

SurfBeat
08-15-2012, 08:16 PM
Phone number for PartsFactor: 866-851-0549

I am not hawking their product, just pointing out I got the best price from them for a Delphi FG-0052 which is the fuel pump for a 97-01 Blazer/Jimmy/Bravada.

SurfBeat
08-18-2012, 03:53 PM
Darn dirty job, 3 1/2 hours for a Olds Bravada: 1) siphoning gas from tank; 2) jacking up the car; 3) removing the spare tire; 4) unplugging about 1/2 hoses that had confusing fasteners; 5) sliding a floor jack under the tank; 6) removing two screws from the harnesses that secure the tank to the frame; 7) tapping off the securing bracket; 8) removing the piece of $hit Airtex fuel filter; then, aligning the tank under the car on top of a floor jack with a 2x4 and securing it.

The dealer wanted $1500 to perform a 3 1/2 job. If you don't mind getting dirty and investing about 4 hours to do the job yourself to save a bunch of dough, then you can do it.

This is the 2nd time I've done it and it wasn't any easier than the first time, however, I was prepared for the problems I encountered last time, i.e., re-installing the tank back.

Good luck grasshoppers.

j cAT
08-19-2012, 09:23 AM
Darn dirty job, 3 1/2 hours for a Olds Bravada: 1) siphoning gas from tank; 2) jacking up the car; 3) removing the spare tire; 4) unplugging about 1/2 hoses that had confusing fasteners; 5) sliding a floor jack under the tank; 6) removing two screws from the harnesses that secure the tank to the frame; 7) tapping off the securing bracket; 8) removing the piece of $hit Airtex fuel filter; then, aligning the tank under the car on top of a floor jack with a 2x4 and securing it.

The dealer wanted $1500 to perform a 3 1/2 job. If you don't mind getting dirty and investing about 4 hours to do the job yourself to save a bunch of dough, then you can do it.

This is the 2nd time I've done it and it wasn't any easier than the first time, however, I was prepared for the problems I encountered last time, i.e., re-installing the tank back.

Good luck grasshoppers.


with difficult tank removals to access the fuel pump the cutting of a hole above the fuel pump to access this pump is done more than you may be aware of. with some heavy galvanized sheet metal you can make a cover. using short self taping screws and a sealer for a gasket this makes future repairs much easier.

this is done even at the dealership. many internet info about those who have done this , with pictures .

Rick Norwood
08-20-2012, 09:25 AM
Darn dirty job, 3 1/2 hours for a Olds Bravada: 1) siphoning gas from tank; 2) jacking up the car; 3) removing the spare tire; 4) unplugging about 1/2 hoses that had confusing fasteners; 5) sliding a floor jack under the tank; 6) removing two screws from the harnesses that secure the tank to the frame; 7) tapping off the securing bracket; 8) removing the piece of $hit Airtex fuel filter; then, aligning the tank under the car on top of a floor jack with a 2x4 and securing it.

The dealer wanted $1500 to perform a 3 1/2 job. If you don't mind getting dirty and investing about 4 hours to do the job yourself to save a bunch of dough, then you can do it.

This is the 2nd time I've done it and it wasn't any easier than the first time, however, I was prepared for the problems I encountered last time, i.e., re-installing the tank back.

Good luck grasshoppers.This is precisely and exactly why you DO NOT install an Airtex piece of crap pump:disappoin, and why you do it right the first time with an AC Delco/Delphi Quality OEM pump!:naughty:

SurfBeat
08-27-2012, 01:50 PM
J-Cat, I was thinking about cutting a hole just as you suggested, however, I figured it would be my luck to cut through the f'n tank, then I really would be screwed, spending the day at a junk yard looking for a replacement.

After I installed the fuel pump a few days later the problem returned; 2 - 3 cranks to get the engine started. Surprising, it cranks over easily in the morning. I am now wondering if my fuel filter is part the problem, or maybe a fuel vacuum line had a hole in it which I did not see when I removed the tank?

Whatever, maybe the time has come to replace the 01 Bravada for a 11 Subaru Outback? I hate to do that because I like the size of the Bravada in contrast to the new SUV's that are just to darn big and the Subaru was the only small SUV that has the power to two my Kawi Jet Ski's to the River. Decisions, decisions.

That said, the gas gauge no longer acts like a windshield wiper and it accurately reflects the amount of gas in the tank.

Rick Norwood
08-29-2012, 06:07 PM
SurfBeat, You absolutely should replace your Fuel Filter. Look at this thread and you'll see why. http://www.automotiveforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=1058250

However, as far as taking 2-3 cranks to fire, when did you last do a tune up? Plugs, wires, Distributor Cap and Rotor. If it has been a while, you might start with these first.

SurfBeat
08-30-2012, 07:50 PM
I replaced plugs and distributor cap in February 2012.

Today I noticed a gas leak - the darn filler neck that connects to the tank has a small crack. When I was taking the hose off I thought that could be a problem.

An eleven year old car made by GM (Government Motors) that has lots of parts made of plastic - I should have expected problems. Saturday I am off to the junk yard to find a replacement fuel tank. Then, it is time to find a replacement for the Bravada - a Subaru Outback or Forester. Those were the only four bangers that enable me to tow my Jet Ski's.

j cAT
08-31-2012, 07:02 AM
I replaced plugs and distributor cap in February 2012.

Today I noticed a gas leak - the darn filler neck that connects to the tank has a small crack. When I was taking the hose off I thought that could be a problem.

An eleven year old car made by GM (Government Motors) that has lots of parts made of plastic - I should have expected problems. Saturday I am off to the junk yard to find a replacement fuel tank. Then, it is time to find a replacement for the Bravada - a Subaru Outback or Forester. Those were the only four bangers that enable me to tow my Jet Ski's.

make a patch for the crack with metal epoxy. they have this in the plumbing supply section. sand tthe surface clean off any oils then apply.

works very good, 5 min cure.

the other product would be marine tex. this epoxy requires about 24 hrs at 70 deg f to cure but very durable especially if used with fiberglass cloth . works excellant on oil pans also.

SurfBeat
08-31-2012, 04:54 PM
I was going to try to epox, then I found a gas tank for $75 at the junk yard and to be on the safe side I bought it. Zero leaks, but I my problem still exists - 2 -3 cranks to crank over the Bravada.

Tomorrow I am tossing out the Auto Zone distributor cap, rotor, Champion plugs I bought in February and replacing them with AC Delco. Throw in some new plug wires. Maybe an oxygen sensor.

Better yet, maybe toss out the GM car and get me a Subaru?

j cAT
09-01-2012, 03:49 PM
I was going to try to epox, then I found a gas tank for $75 at the junk yard and to be on the safe side I bought it. Zero leaks, but I my problem still exists - 2 -3 cranks to crank over the Bravada.

Tomorrow I am tossing out the Auto Zone distributor cap, rotor, Champion plugs I bought in February and replacing them with AC Delco. Throw in some new plug wires. Maybe an oxygen sensor.

Better yet, maybe toss out the GM car and get me a Subaru?

turn ignition on,,, wait 2 sec. then crank engine

Rick Norwood
09-04-2012, 07:49 AM
Been There, done that, Bought the T-Shirt.

http://www.automotiveforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=975186

AC-Delco is the only way to go!

CharlieB53
10-19-2012, 09:28 PM
......................... get me a Subaru?

If you're seriously thinking about getting one, I suggest you check out the articles on Subaru Head Gasket Failures.

Dealers are simply replacing the gaskets, and they keep on failing, until someone takes the time to drop the motor, mill the cyl and heads FLAT, then install the upgraded gaskets.

The Dealers just keep you coming back so they can charge you all that labor.

Other than the head gaskets, the Outback is a fine vehicle.

SurfBeat
10-21-2012, 03:11 PM
"If you're seriously thinking about getting" [a Subaru or Forester], "I suggest you check out the articles on Subaru Head Gasket Failures.

Dealers are simply replacing the gaskets, and they keep on failing, until someone takes the time to drop the motor, mill the cyl and heads FLAT, then install the upgraded gaskets.

The Dealers just keep you coming back so they can charge you all that labor.

Other than the head gaskets, the Outback is a fine vehicle.

Thanks for the info Charlie. I will definitely check your suggestion out. I may just purchase a 6 cylinder 2010 Toyota Highlander because I know a lot more about the dependability of Toyota's must know very little about Subaru's. Sometimes it is just better to go with what ya know.

old_master
10-21-2012, 03:25 PM
If you know the dependability record of the Toyota, why are you considering buying one? ;)

SurfBeat
10-22-2012, 12:41 PM
If you know the dependability record of the Toyota, why are you considering buying one? ;)

Well Old Master, as a starter, I have never heard anyone I know complain of owning a Toyota. In fact, two friends who own Toyota's that have over 150,000 miles on them related they never had a problem with theirs.

On that note, my GM Olds Bravada required the following parts replacements: 1) two starters; 2) one fuel pump; 3) Intake Manifold Gasket; 3) Engine Cooler Lines; 4) Transfer Case Rear Seal; 5) interior plastic parts breaking; 6) interior squeaks like a pig.

Now, albeit my Bravada could pass for new in appearance, on its best day I could only put a for sale sticker on it in the amount of $3300, however, a Toyota Highlander in the same condition reaps more than twice that amount, $7600.

I can't recall how much more a Toyota Highlander cost in 2001 than my Olds Bravada, however, I doubt it was almost 5K more?

If both SUV's were about the same in price when new, then, the Toyota was the better buy, however, if the Toyota was 5K more, then, considering my repair costs for my Bravada since 2001 were about a grand, then, the Bravada wins by 4k.

Just some thoughts.

j cAT
10-22-2012, 05:28 PM
I am a GM owner since 1967. working on vehicle #4. GM has been designing vehicles for failure mileage and years of life.

with the vehicles others have owned family members etc. Toyota appears to be designed for better performance and life.

Now in todays market GM quality and durability is falling.

my next vehicle looks like a Toyota. having looked into reliability and dealership help with the small vehicle issues of family member Toyota vehicles I find they are far better than GM.

GM is just out to screw us !

old_master
10-22-2012, 05:35 PM
Interesting viewpoint, but there's something a little more sinister involved here.... Who gets screwed if everybody buys foreign cars?

j cAT
10-22-2012, 05:47 PM
Interesting viewpoint, but there's something a little more sinister involved here.... Who gets screwed if everybody buys foreign cars?

well that is why I purchased a GM made in USA vehicles over these many years.

now however it is a strange trading world we live in.

you know your friend OBAMA . well he gave GM several billion dollars to save them and the jobs in the automotve industry. shortly after this bailout GM opens a huge auto plant in CHINA !

toyota makes many of its vehicles here. true the company is based in japan.

much of GM materials and parts are chinese. the vehicles are made in many countries. not like many years ago.

should Romney get in we will loose more good paying jobs.

how many house cleaners can these millionares hire anyway.

SurfBeat
10-23-2012, 11:54 AM
I am a GM owner since 1967. . GM has been designing vehicles for failure mileage and years of life. in todays market GM quality and durability is falling. GM is just out to screw us !

Cat, I was unable to comprehend part of your message "GM has been designing vehicles for failure mileage and years of life."

It appears from your message that you opined that GM vehicles were designed for
FAILURE, but YEARS IF LIFE?

After Barrack bailed out the unions to keep GM alive, I would never purchase a GM product unless I was given a substantial discount, i.e., 50% off dealers cost. I say that because my taxes support a private company and I now its time for my rebate, just like the dead beat homeowners got.

j cAT
10-23-2012, 05:28 PM
GM does design vehicles for end of life/period of use. 50,ooomi and about 7yrs. that depends on where/how the vehicle is used. they do this as they cut costs make cheap crap that does have a short life. it is all about the profit ,not customer satisfaction or reliability. thats why shortly after the warrantee ends these GM vehicles start breaking down, lots to repair. If you do it your self and smart shop parts it is not too bad. as the miles and years add up time to get rid of it.spend too much time and money on it.

toyota is another story , they do last longer. they are designed for reliability.

now the Chinese and japs are fighting over some rocks[they call Islands] in the china sea. the Chinese are not buying any jap cars. what they are buying in large amounts is those Chinese made GM vehicles. the only reason they can by them is because OBAMA gave GM the cash to survive.

j cAT
10-23-2012, 05:37 PM
we will get more of the GM bail out than you think as chinese buy those GM made vehicles.

the homeowners that the Banks used "AS STATED INCOME " to get all those loans we will not see one cent.

many investors all over the world bought those loans and they got screwed.

not one banker in jail not one. and they stole hundreds of billions.

the banks do run this country/world.

MagicRat
10-24-2012, 12:29 AM
recent word has it that Romney and a group of investors bought Delphi (former AC/Delco) before the bailout. (at something like 65 cents a share)
They threatened to cease production of GM steering columns (this shutting down GM production) unless they got GM bailout money. They did, and promptly closed 13 out of 14 US plants and moved most production to China.
The Romneys personally made (up to) $115 million because the share price rose to $22 per share... so they sold.

Yes this is a gross oversimplification, but money does make the world go around

CUPER
11-13-2012, 10:59 AM
AIRTEX is the worst pump, i reemplace 3 times in 9 months in a f250,las time i buy a motorcraft, more quiet and i have 6 months and no problems, the first two airtex pumps only work 4 four months, the third pump only 1 month.

Rick Norwood
11-14-2012, 09:23 AM
Good tips. I've had an Airtex pump in my car for a couple of years without any problems.You are the exception rather than the rule, and you're probably on borrowed time. Please provide the make, model and year of your vehicle for reference.

Rick Norwood
11-17-2012, 08:01 AM
AIRTEX is the worst pump, i reemplace 3 times in 9 months in a f250,las time i buy a motorcraft, more quiet and i have 6 months and no problems, the first two airtex pumps only work 4 four months, the third pump only 1 month.
Simply put, Airtex pumps are pure garbage. I can't say it enough. the rumor was, it was only the Blazer models that were bad, Now it looks like the F250 models is in the same boat.

I KEEP HEARING THE SAME SONG OVER AND OVER AGAIN. MY AIRTEX PUMP ONLY LASTED 6 MONTHS, OR I HAVE PUT 3 OF THEM IN XX MONTHS.

STOP BUYING THEM AND DON'T PUT AIRTEX FUEL PUMPS IN ANY VEHICLE, PERIOD.

Rick Norwood
11-18-2012, 10:52 AM
The most amazing thing about Airtex Garbage Fuel Pumps is how we never hear from anyone truly defending them outside of a rare occasional car owner that happened to get lucky with one of their POS Pumps. We never hear anything from the people who make them (factory workers) or their management. MY THEORY IS, THEY ALL KNOW DAMN WELL HOW BAD THIER PUMPS ARE AND ARE TO ASHAMED TO SHOW UP ON THIS FORUM AND DEFEND THEMSELVES.

So, Here is my open challenge to any ad all Airtex Management, Engineering, Quality Control, Production staff, and/or Return/Warranty Dept. personnel:

Log in and discuss your product on this Forum.

old_master
11-18-2012, 01:25 PM
You're assuming they can read..... English ;)

dep124
04-10-2013, 11:44 AM
Hello All,

Just came across this thread after a search to find out about the quality/reliability of Airtex fuel pumps. 116 pages! Wow. Very informative. Didnt read all but enough to get a very good idea of Airtex products.

Im curious if Airtex pumps have gotten any better in quality? I seem to remember reading some comment in passing not too long ago about Airtex finally getting the message and improving their pumps.

Is this the case or are they still producing the same junk as in the past?

BTW...I have a 93 S-10 Blazer with 97,xxx orig miles. I bought it because the body/frame was rock solid. And in this part of the country (NYS) thats rare if a vehicle is driven in the winter. Hooray for that wonderful calcium! Pulled the engine due to a bad rod and am about ready now to reinstall but noticed the brake/fuel lines need to be replaced.

Since this will make it necessary to drop the tank I was giving some thought to replacing the pump (wouldnt be surprised if it still has the original). At this point it hasnt run in about three years. Should I just give the pump a good inspection and take the "if it aint broke dont fix it" position and reinstall or consider replacing?

Ken

Rick Norwood
04-10-2013, 12:20 PM
DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES RISK PUTTING AN AIRTEX PIECE OF CRAP PUMP IN YOUR TANK, OR ANY OTHER AFTERMARKET PUMP.

Do yourself a huge favor and put an AC-Delco Delphi pump in and do it right the first time. The cost difference is too small, usually the AC-Delco pump is only about $50 more, but well worth the money.

As far as I am concerned the "Don't fix what ain't broke" works. Change your Fuel Filter, then test the fuel pump pressure and see what happens.

Rick Norwood
08-19-2013, 06:31 PM
Well Airtex, I just thought you might like to know that it has been 3 full years since I carved your piece of crap Airtex Fuel Pump out of my 2000 Jimmy, and replaced it with an AC Delco-Delphi Fuel Pump. 3 wonderful, beautiful, trouble free years without one single problem. I'll just bet you lay in your beds at night wishing you had a track record like that.

But the big question I have to ask is this, What exactly do you think about when you lay in your beds at night? Do you toss and turn knowing you have ripped thousands of people off by selling them your garbage, worthless, piece of crap pumps? Or do you sleep peacefully with the teachings of P.T. Barnum (of Barnum & Bailey's Circus) "there's a sucker Born evey minute"?

harvey manwarren
01-20-2015, 04:00 PM
Airtex Fuel Delivery Systems, the world's largest manufacturer of fuel pumps, must do something right

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