Automotive Forums .com - the leading automotive community online! Automotive Forums .com - the leading automotive community online!
Automotive Forums .com - the leading automotive community online! 
-
Latest | 0 Rplys
Go Back   Automotive Forums .com Car Chat > Engineering/Technical
Engineering/Technical Ask technical questions about cars. Do you know how a car engine works?
Reply Show Printable Version Show Printable Version | Email this Page Email this Page | Subscription Subscribe to this Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-16-2023, 08:54 PM   #1
jeffmorris
AF Regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 133
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Engine stand safety

People usually use engine stands when rebuilding engines. Engines are supported at flywheel end. Nothing supports the front end. When someone loosens or tightens bolts and nuts at the front end, the engine will "bounce". What if someone tries to loosen a very stubborn bolt and the engine falls over?
jeffmorris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2023, 11:24 PM   #2
RidingOnRailz
AF Enthusiast
 
RidingOnRailz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stamford, Connecticut
Posts: 753
Thanks: 44
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Cool Re: Engine stand safety

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmorris View Post
People usually use engine stands when rebuilding engines. Engines are supported at flywheel end. Nothing supports the front end. When someone loosens or tightens bolts and nuts at the front end, the engine will "bounce". What if someone tries to loosen a very stubborn bolt and the engine falls over?
Then you have the plot for a Blake Edwards film...
__________________
Longacre Racing...

The BEST Tire Gauges 1 AU from the Sun!
RidingOnRailz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2023, 12:23 AM   #3
Stealthee
Your worst nightmare
 
Stealthee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Smithfield, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,046
Thanks: 36
Thanked 251 Times in 245 Posts
Re: Engine stand safety

I don't think you have any idea how stable an engine stand is.
__________________
Stealthee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2023, 09:02 PM   #4
jeffmorris
AF Regular
Thread starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 133
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Re: Engine stand safety

I have seen the video at "I do Cars" website where Eric tried to loosen a bolt that refused to come off the crankshaft. I think that the engine was in a wooden box. He used a forklift to hold the engine down while he used a very long breaker bar to get the bolt loose. He disassembled another engine that was mounted on a stand. When he couldn't get the bolt loose, he planned to put the engine in a wooden box and do the same thing but he finally got the bolt loose.
jeffmorris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2023, 02:07 AM   #5
ducked
AF Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Location: Tainan
Posts: 55
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re: Engine stand safety

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmorris View Post
People usually use engine stands when rebuilding engines. Engines are supported at flywheel end. Nothing supports the front end. When someone loosens or tightens bolts and nuts at the front end, the engine will "bounce". What if someone tries to loosen a very stubborn bolt and the engine falls over?

Be a good idea to get out of the way before it lands on your foot, then.



I dunno how likely this is, not having had an engine stand, but I've recently had reason to be impressed by how tight crankshat bolts can be. Movement is going to reduce the amount of force you can apply.



Engine in car, I took the head off and packed all 3 cylinders with rope, and put the head back on, to lock the crankshaft.


Manual has you holding it on brakes and transmission.



NEVER HAPPEN.


Most videos of people using extensions and levers on the pulley bolt show them using an axle stand as a fulcrum. I found using the front wheels, some hardwood planks and steel pipe as fulcrum allowed me to stand on it and put my back and leg (and torn up shoulder) muscles into it.


CRAK!


Not (well, not only) my shoulder.
ducked is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

POST REPLY TO THIS THREAD

Go Back   Automotive Forums .com Car Chat > Engineering/Technical

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:53 PM.

Community Participation Guidelines | How to use your User Control Panel

Powered by: vBulletin | Copyright Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
 
 
no new posts