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Frost on the Inside


flashlight
01-08-2010, 04:02 AM
Got off from work and went to scrape the windows like normal. After scraping the outside discovered that the inside also had frost buildup on it. What could have caused this to happen? And is there a way to fix it so that it doesn't happen again? Thanks for everyone's help in this matter. :screwy:

Woodie83
01-08-2010, 05:28 AM
You got into the car with snow all over your boots and when it melted it made the inside of the car humid. When you stopped driving, the windows fogged up, then froze. Open a window a crack or, even better, get into the habit of leaving your HVAC set to bring in outside air.

MagicRat
01-08-2010, 05:51 AM
You got into the car with snow all over your boots and when it melted it made the inside of the car humid. When you stopped driving, the windows fogged up, then froze. Open a window a crack or, even better, get into the habit of leaving your HVAC set to bring in outside air.

yes, the frozen windows also happens if the car is left outside in the sun. A sunny winter.s day turns the car into a little greenhouse. It warms up enough to make it nice and humid inside. As the sun goes down, the car cools off, the humidity condences on the windows and freezes.

As noted above, park with a window open a crack, especially on a sunny day.

brivers
01-09-2010, 01:37 AM
Your heater core is leaking.

Woodie83
01-09-2010, 05:33 AM
That's a very real possibility that I had overlooked. If the heater is leaking you should smell it though.

brivers
01-09-2010, 10:50 AM
It is a very small leak that exhumes a mist you can't see,.... yet.

MagicRat
01-09-2010, 11:33 AM
Your heater core is leaking.

Uh..... no. Respectfully, this is impossible.

Leaking heater cores leak antifreeze, which does not turn to frost on the window. That is why it's called antifreeze :) The only way this would be possible is if the cooling system had only water in it...... which would have frozen by this time, and would have broken the engine block.

The antifreeeze residue would remain an greasy, liquid layer on the window and would have a distinctive odor, as noted above.

brivers
01-09-2010, 01:05 PM
You sound awfully sure of yourself Magic not knowing what his antifreeze protection is degree wise, or outside temperature is. Under most circumstances, moisture inside the car means heater core leak.
Impossible.....I think not. Respectfully that is.

flashlight
01-09-2010, 02:16 PM
Leaving the window open just a crack before going to work and there was no frost on the inside this time. Also there is no strange smells that could be coming from the heater.

MagicRat
01-09-2010, 05:21 PM
You sound awfully sure of yourself Magic not knowing what his antifreeze protection is degree wise, or outside temperature is. Under most circumstances, moisture inside the car means heater core leak.
Impossible.....I think not. Respectfully that is.
:shakehead
No... it's impossible. What you say is impossible, due to simple physics and the parameters of the post. Here's why:

1. If its cold enough to freeze coolant on a parked car's windshield, its cold enough to freeze the coolant in the engine block, radiator and heater core.

2. When these components freeze solid, they rupture, because the frozen water or coolant expands (by about 10%). This rupture is enough to cause a major coolant leak, the next time the engine is started.

3. Now, since the OP is still driving the car and mentions nothing about a massive coolant leak, nor a coolant odor, we can assume no parts have ruptured.

4. This means that its not cold enough to freeze the coolant.

5. Therefore, any leaking coolant will not freeze on the windshield.

6. Therefore the ice on the windshield is not coolant.

Understand? :)

Now, forgive me if I seem cranky, but if this still does not make sense to you, please enlighten yourself to the basic laws of thermodyamics. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laws_of_thermodynamics

danielsatur
01-09-2010, 05:26 PM
Was the external circulate (fresh air) vent open all night? Almost like leaving a window open all night.

consultIII
01-09-2010, 08:38 PM
caused by environmental conditions/humidity like some of the others have posted. I've found cleaning the inside of my windshield reduces it somewhat. I think I remember from science 101, 22 years ago, that up in the clouds snow crystals first form around dust in the atmosphere.

brivers
01-09-2010, 08:51 PM
[quote=MagicRat;6090368]:shakehead
No... it's impossible. What you say is impossible, due to simple physics and the parameters of the post. Here's why:

Don't want to get into a thing with you Mr. Einstein.
I never said it was antifreeze that froze on the windshield. I simply was offering a possible problem he could have. A leaking heater core can humidify the air going through it which can condense on the inside of the windshield and freeze or fog on the glass. Hell, it could be snow melted on the floor humidifying the air, I don't know. Maybe its not his heater core, but if it were my car I would be concerned and at least check it. I didn't see where you posted a possible cause to his problem, only criticisms of other posts.

Woodie83
01-10-2010, 05:41 AM
Leaking heater core will absolutely fog up the windows, why wouldn't it freeze? Engine coolant is 50/50 antifreeze and water, soak the carpet really good and the water is going to evaporate out of it.

randall 37382
01-10-2010, 10:25 AM
Just thought i would throw this out there. If by chance you had a hole rusted in the floor, you could be getting moisture in your carpet from there. Might cause the greenhouse effect. Just a thought.

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