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2006 Volvo XC90 - TWO Tire & Load Stickers!


RidingOnRailz
07-21-2021, 08:44 PM
2006 Volvo XC90 - TWO Tire & Load Stickers!

I recently adjusted the tire pressures on someone's XC90, when I realized there were TWO sets of tire pressures listed on the B-pillar.

On the more 'official' looking sticker, the cold PSI = 39.

On the plainer one, labeled VOLVO, 32PSI cold.

The OEM tire size on both placards, as well as on the vehicle, match - 235/65R17 - which, along with the 39psi, checks out on tirepressure . org.

I set the tires all to 36psi this evening; they were all only 29-30psi upon our guests' arrival.

Why two stickers? And why no warning on either about reduced pressures or load?

CapriRacer
07-22-2021, 07:06 AM
2006 Volvo XC90 - TWO Tire & Load Stickers!

I recently adjusted the tire pressures on someone's XC90, when I realized there were TWO sets of tire pressures listed on the B-pillar.

On the more 'official' looking sticker, the cold PSI = 39.

On the plainer one, labeled VOLVO, 32PSI cold.

The OEM tire size on both placards, as well as on the vehicle, match - 235/65R17 - which, along with the 39psi, checks out on tirepressure . org.

I set the tires all to 36psi this evening; they were all only 29-30psi upon our guests' arrival.

Why two stickers? And why no warning on either about reduced pressures or load?

I sure wish you'd taken a photo of them!

According to Tire Guides, the proper inflation pressure for a 2006 Volvo XC90 is 39 psi. To my eye that's a bit unusual.

So doing a little checking, the size listed in Tire Guides has a Load Index for a Standard Load tire - and that is even further unusual. The only time I have seen this kind of thing is when an OEM is trying to fix a handling problem they discovered too late to change the vehicle - so they "fixed" it by upping the tire pressure.

Further, Tire Guides says that 2007 and newer model years are supposed use to 36 psi - and that makes more sense.

Going even further back, They did use 32 psi on some earlier model years.

Then there is the issue that this was taking place in a time of transition. The Ford/Firestone thing happened in 2000 and there was lots of talk about how much load carrying capacity the stock tire size/inflation pressure combinations were specifying - and lots of talk that many vehicles needed to use more,

The end result was that NHTSA specified that by the 2008 model year a new tire placard would be required - like this:

[[OK, the powers that be aren't allowing me to post either an image nor a link, so I will describe the placard instead.]]

The new placard has a yellow highlighted area at the top. It could be used BEFORE the 2008 model year but was mandatory for anything sold in the US after the 2008 model year. Goggle "Tire Placard" for images.

So my best guess is that Volvo decided to upgrade their pressure info and for some peculiar reason decided to issue another placard - perhaps they did this AFTER the vehicle was built.

RidingOnRailz
07-22-2021, 03:29 PM
I sure wish you'd taken a photo of them!

According to Tire Guides, the proper inflation pressure for a 2006 Volvo XC90 is 39 psi. To my eye that's a bit unusual.

So doing a little checking, the size listed in Tire Guides has a Load Index for a Standard Load tire - and that is even further unusual. The only time I have seen this kind of thing is when an OEM is trying to fix a handling problem they discovered too late to change the vehicle - so they "fixed" it by upping the tire pressure.

Further, Tire Guides says that 2007 and newer model years are supposed use to 36 psi - and that makes more sense.

Going even further back, They did use 32 psi on some earlier model years.

Then there is the issue that this was taking place in a time of transition. The Ford/Firestone thing happened in 2000 and there was lots of talk about how much load carrying capacity the stock tire size/inflation pressure combinations were specifying - and lots of talk that many vehicles needed to use more,

The end result was that NHTSA specified that by the 2008 model year a new tire placard would be required - like this:

[[OK, the powers that be aren't allowing me to post either an image nor a link, so I will describe the placard instead.]]

The new placard has a yellow highlighted area at the top. It could be used BEFORE the 2008 model year but was mandatory for anything sold in the US after the 2008 model year. Goggle "Tire Placard" for images.

So my best guess is that Volvo decided to upgrade their pressure info and for some peculiar reason decided to issue another placard - perhaps they did this AFTER the vehicle was built.

Thanks for the info! As you already know I'm pretty particular about this tire pressure thang.. :D

Yes, the 39psi cold spec is on the placard that says TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION in yellow on top, along with the symbol of a tire, above the lines listing the pressures for road tires an the spare. Just like the one on my Honda and anything else built within the last 20 years.

The placard with the 32 spec is plainer, black & white, with "Optional Pressure" on top, and Volvo's name at one end. That's a 7psi difference, and I'm sure many drivers would not know which to set them to!

I split the difference, and set them to 36psi last evening. Better than the 29-30psi they were when company arrived!

Got a link to that Tire Guides Capri? Would sure appreciate it.

Tirepressure.com recently eliminated all lookups before model year 2005 - used to go back to M.Y. 1983. When I e-mailed him, he said "there wasn't much demand for tire info before 2000", and he said it freed up server space. What??

Tirepressure.org still goes back to '83 though.

If I were running a tire pressure lookup site, I'd maintain info on tires back to Elvis & Chuck Berry!

CapriRacer
07-23-2021, 05:51 AM
Thanks for the info! As you already know I'm pretty particular about this tire pressure thang.. :D

Yes, the 39psi cold spec is on the placard that says TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION in yellow on top, along with the symbol of a tire, above the lines listing the pressures for road tires an the spare. Just like the one on my Honda and anything else built within the last 20 years.

The placard with the 32 spec is plainer, black & white, with "Optional Pressure" on top, and Volvo's name at one end. That's a 7psi difference, and I'm sure many drivers would not know which to set them to!

I split the difference, and set them to 36psi last evening. Better than the 29-30psi they were when company arrived!

Got a link to that Tire Guides Capri? Would sure appreciate it.

Tirepressure.com recently eliminated all lookups before model year 2005 - used to go back to M.Y. 1983. When I e-mailed him, he said "there wasn't much demand for tire info before 2000", and he said it freed up server space. What??

Tirepressure.org still goes back to '83 though.

If I were running a tire pressure lookup site, I'd maintain info on tires back to Elvis & Chuck Berry!

First, that yellow sticker is from the 2008 or so timeframe. That format was dictated by NHTSA. Before that the format wasn't mandated and a variety of different formats were used by the OEM's.

Tire Guides is a publication outfit. http://tireguides.com/ You have to buy their publication(s) to get their information.

I suspect Tire Pressure.com is using them as a source. The reason I suspect that is the peculiar way tirepressure.com formats things. What Tire Guides does is much more logical.

Also Tire Guides goes as far back as they can. They publish an "Old Timers Guide" which lists stuff way back - Model T era! Even they don't publish a yearly update anymore. The Old Timers Guide is updated every 5 years or so.

RidingOnRailz
07-23-2021, 07:03 AM
First, that yellow sticker is from the 2008 or so timeframe. That format was dictated by NHTSA. Before that the format wasn't mandated and a variety of different formats were used by the OEM's.

Tire Guides is a publication outfit. http://tireguides.com/ You have to buy their publication(s) to get their information.

I suspect Tire Pressure.com is using them as a source. The reason I suspect that is the peculiar way tirepressure.com formats things. What Tire Guides does is much more logical.

Also Tire Guides goes as far back as they can. They publish an "Old Timers Guide" which lists stuff way back - Model T era! Even they don't publish a yearly update anymore. The Old Timers Guide is updated every 5 years or so.

Well, it was still easy enough, in 2000, to find the correct cold tire info for the 1996 Ford Contour I was driving back then, and to finally end my practice of inflating my tires to the max cold plus 5psi! With my ADHD, I couldn't tell the difference between the appearances of tire pressure decals from 2000 to present, other than the colors. 2008 is "within twenty years" to quote myself, so it is partially correct.

Check out tirepressure.org. Their formatting is a little different, plus they have other tire-related tables.

Coukd you please snap photos of the pressures Tire Guides lists for 1981 Buick Century Limited and a 1973 Mercury Comet? Cars from my past! Basic info like tire pressure and ignition timing should be FREE

CapriRacer
07-26-2021, 07:30 AM
Well, it was still easy enough, in 2000, to find the correct cold tire info for the 1996 Ford Contour I was driving back then, and to finally end my practice of inflating my tires to the max cold plus 5psi! With my ADHD, I couldn't tell the difference between the appearances of tire pressure decals from 2000 to present, other than the colors. 2008 is "within twenty years" to quote myself, so it is partially correct.

Check out tirepressure.org. Their formatting is a little different, plus they have other tire-related tables.

Could you please snap photos of the pressures Tire Guides lists for 1981 Buick Century Limited and a 1973 Mercury Comet? Cars from my past! Basic info like tire pressure and ignition timing should be FREE

Still working on how to do the photo thing.

I use Tire Guides for a different purpose than most folks. As above I am looking at trends and changes from year to year. Lots of what I do involves answering questions just like the one you asked. Tire Guides is extremely helpful in that regard.

CapriRacer
07-29-2021, 07:18 AM
I've tried this a number of different ways and I can't get the photos anywhere I can send to you - except by email.

So send me an email through my website: Barry@barrystiretech.com

RidingOnRailz
07-29-2021, 07:58 AM
I've tried this a number of different ways and I can't get the photos anywhere I can send to you - except by email.

So send me an email through my website: Barry@barrystiretech.com

This site does limit the size/dimension of photos to be uploaded to it, else I would screen cap the icon above to attach images.

Will do the e-mail thing.

RidingOnRailz
07-29-2021, 12:16 PM
I've tried this a number of different ways and I can't get the photos anywhere I can send to you - except by email.

So send me an email through my website: Barry@barrystiretech.com


Just checking - did you receive my e-mail?

CapriRacer
07-30-2021, 07:31 AM
Just checking - did you receive my e-mail?

Yes, and you should have gotten the response.

My problem was that I had to put the photos somewhere on the net. Photobucket wouldn't allow me to "host" - which means I couldn't provide a link.

RidingOnRailz
07-30-2021, 08:08 AM
Yes, and you should have gotten the response.

My problem was that I had to put the photos
somewhere on the net. Photobucket wouldn't
allow me to "host" - which means I couldn't
provide a link.


Thank you! I got them!

Now I see why Tire Guides charges such a premium for this information.


Interesting, for my college-mobile circa early 1990s - the '81 Century - the sedans called for 35psi cold all around, for all sizes of tires, yet the station wagons for that model year drop the psi up front to 30. Remember I was the fool who kept that Buick's tires at 40psi! 5psi over both Buick and the maximum inflation on its tires.

Since you are the tire guru, any insight on that decision, with the wagons?

Were they doing what I was attempting to with my 2010 Honda - my increasing of cold pressure under the heavier axle, and lowering it beneath the lighter axle?

Interesting stuff! Stuff I know most daily drivers pay little attn. to.

CapriRacer
07-31-2021, 08:29 AM
Station wagons are an interesting variation. On the one side, they are very much like your common everyday sedan. On the other side, they have more space - and sometimes, more seats! That means that there is weight a little further out from the center and that affects handling.

There doesn't appear to be one way in which the tire situation was handled for station wagons. Sometimes station wagons used larger tires. Sometimes they didn't.

But there is one thing to consider: In an emergency maneuver, extra weight in the tail of a vehicle will cause the tail to swing out more - and that could lead to loss of control. If you can't raise the rear tire pressures, then lowering the fronts will cause the front end to more slowly react to steering input - which in turn reduces that swing out tendency.

RidingOnRailz
08-12-2021, 08:57 PM
Station wagons are an interesting variation. On the one side, they are very much like your common everyday sedan. On the other side, they have more space - and sometimes, more seats! That means that there is weight a little further out from the center and that affects handling.

There doesn't appear to be one way in which the tire situation was handled for station wagons. Sometimes station wagons used larger tires. Sometimes they didn't.

But there is one thing to consider: In an emergency maneuver, extra weight in the tail of a vehicle will cause the tail to swing out more - and that could lead to loss of control. If you can't raise the rear tire pressures, then lowering the fronts will cause the front end to more slowly react to steering input - which in turn reduces that swing out tendency.


Kind of like what I've seen with full-size vans of the not too distant past - think Econoline, Express, RamWagon 3500 - quite often the vanmakers specified the same pressure as the maximum cold pressure on the tires, for the rear axle, and a lower cold value for the front axle, to add some weight and feel to the steering. IE: F: 55-60psi, R: 80.

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