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Camber kit required for alignment?


Rhodesplyr
12-02-2013, 02:02 PM
I just finished going through the ordeal of putting new inner tie-rod ends on my '94 Lesabre so it could be aligned, to prevent premature wear of the four new tires I just had to put on it.

I just went back to the alignment shop that told me I needed new tie-rods, a shop that charged me for the tie-rod diagnosis, and they now tell me that I need a camber kit for the right, front wheel that's going to add $100 to the cost of alignment.

Is this a common thing with these now that the suspensions are getting old? I was getting excessive wear on the inner edges of my previous tires.

gmtech1
12-02-2013, 05:51 PM
I just finished going through the ordeal of putting new inner tie-rod ends on my '94 Lesabre so it could be aligned, to prevent premature wear of the four new tires I just had to put on it.

I just went back to the alignment shop that told me I needed new tie-rods, a shop that charged me for the tie-rod diagnosis, and they now tell me that I need a camber kit for the right, front wheel that's going to add $100 to the cost of alignment.

Is this a common thing with these now that the suspensions are getting old? I was getting excessive wear on the inner edges of my previous tires.

I would be surprised if there is not enough adjustment to get your car in specs. A kit is not USUALLY needed, just loosen the strut to knuckle bolts and lean the knuckle in or out. If the tire is wearing on the inside edge, it's either toed out or has too much negative camber, or both. Have you hit anything or been hit in the R/F? A bent steering knuckle will cause negative camber and may not allow for enough positive adjustment to get to where it needs to be.

Rhodesplyr
12-02-2013, 06:00 PM
I would be surprised if there is not enough adjustment to get your car in specs. A kit is not USUALLY needed, just loosen the strut to knuckle bolts and lean the knuckle in or out. If the tire is wearing on the inside edge, it's either toed out or has too much negative camber, or both. Have you hit anything or been hit in the R/F? A bent steering knuckle will cause negative camber and may not allow for enough positive adjustment to get to where it needs to be.

I don't know of anything I've hit that would have bent the steering, and I haven't been hit by anything. The last time the car was aligned, three years ago, it was OK.

On the right front wheel, the Specified Range on his printout is -0.3 to 0.7 degrees Camber. The actual Camber he noted on my right front wheel was -0.7 degrees.

gmtech1
12-02-2013, 06:46 PM
I don't know of anything I've hit that would have bent the steering, and I haven't been hit by anything. The last time the car was aligned, three years ago, it was OK.

On the right front wheel, the Specified Range on his printout is -0.3 to 0.7 degrees Camber. The actual Camber he noted on my right front wheel was -0.7 degrees.

Only needing .4 deg adjustment to be into specs. I would prefer it be closer to 0 or a little on the positive side, like +.20 deg. There should be plenty of adjustment there. Not seeing it for myself, I can't say for sure. If it's -.70 and there is no adjustment remaining, there is a problem.

maxwedge
12-02-2013, 08:02 PM
This can happen if the springs have sagged, but usually to both sides, any bushing or ball joint wear could cause camber readings to be off also.

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