Tamiya vs. Revell - Let's get it on!!


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Murco
02-09-2002, 02:03 AM
I know how much many of you regard Tamiya models, as do I, but I think many of you are giving Revell a bad rap that is uncalled for. For fun and education let's look at the products in direct comparison...

* Fidelity - Hard to argue against Tamiya. The bodies and overall castings are crisper and near perfect in every dimension but Revell has closed the gap tremendously over the past 5 years.
Point - Tamiya

* Detail - Revell owns this one as practically every model they make has a full engine. The recent "Pro Modeler" kits also have hinge detail!! Tamiya, while awesome when it comes to body details, has dropped engines from most of the street cars it offers.
Point - Revell

* Ease of assembly - Tamiya owns this category. I have never had a warped body or kit that needed help with parts aligning. Revell, while still closing the gap, does exhibit the occasional fitment problems.
Point - Tamiya

* Variety - Revell makes American, German, and Japanese cars, GT1 Porsches, movie cars, the best Nascars, and classics from around the world in sizes from 1/43 to 1/8!! Tamiya focuses mostly on Exotics, JDM cars, GT, DTM, F1, and WRC cars with few large scale offerings.
Point - Revell (for sizes), Tamiya (for range)

* Aftermarket - There isn't a Revell kit tooled in the last 6 years that doesn't have a full set of exquisite Photo-etch emblems and details available from Model Car Garage. That doesn't even count the various other photo-etch poducts available for carb linkages, distributors, brake rotors or the resin calipers or machined aluminum parts available. Tamiya doesn't have that kind of aftermarket support because of limited engine detail.
Point -Revell

* Price - Later Revell kits average over 110 parts, mostly due to engine/transmissions being included. Tamiya averages 65 parts yet, at least in the U.S., costs usually 40 - 100% more for a comparable model without the extra detail.
Point - Revell

* Winners - Revell products have won a GSL "Best of Show" award in 5 of the last 7 events. This competition attracts the very best builders from around the world and they choose Revell products when they want to win.
Point - Revell

When I want a quick shelf model or a JDM car, I pick Tamiya. When I want to kick butt and make peoples jaws drop, I go with Revell!!

Mikke
02-09-2002, 02:09 AM
That's pretty much my opinion, too. I just hate that Revell-Monogram makes both 1/24 and 1/25 scale. Point: Tamiya :D

The lack of engine detail in Tamiya car kits nearly made me switch over to Tamiya bikes, though. :zx11pisse

4x4 Cactus
02-09-2002, 03:01 AM
There are only afew revel kits here not the best and latest so ill stick with tamiya which can be found everywhere.

Thing-A-Majig
02-09-2002, 03:47 AM
good points. i dont have anything against revell i just prefer tamiya's selection :)

turbos86
02-09-2002, 05:05 AM
Who makes Initial D models?
Point - Fujimi
LOL:D :D :D :D


Maybe its just me, but it feels better to see Japanese all over the box and instructions when I'm building a kit. This is why I choose Tamiya over Revell. Althought Revell do make non-america cars, they lack in variety. And why can't they stick to either 1/24 or 1/25 scale...makes me mad how the ITR is not 1/24:angryfire

Bobj
02-09-2002, 05:29 AM
I did revell nascar and it was crap parts didn't fit lots of flash,and very bad decals had to use two tubes of super glue to hold the thing together. Would only buy revell to do musle car or hot rod. Half the price half the quality, Tamiya wins all the time.:cool:

turbos86
02-09-2002, 05:56 AM
Originally posted by Bobj
I did revell nascar and it was crap parts didn't fit lots of flash,and very bad decals had to use two tubes of super glue to hold the thing together. Would only buy revell to do musle car or hot rod. Half the price half the quality, Tamiya wins all the time.:cool:

I agree, they make sh*t decals.(Example: Their ITR kit, I have one and seen another, both of which are missing the R in the Type R logos....Type "blank") I've pay money to buy the kit and I EXPECT it to be good. :finger: My first few model cars where all Revell-monogram, and most of the parts didn't fit correctly...but they were dirt cheap...good thing

tazdev
02-09-2002, 06:37 AM
what does JDM stand for?

Jay!
02-09-2002, 06:43 AM
Originally posted by tazdev
what does JDM stand for? Japanese Domestic Market.

Nice comparison. :D

flyonthewall
02-09-2002, 07:58 AM
But arent most of Revels kits from the toolings of other manufacturers which Revel have brought over the years (mostly monogram since they bought them out)? I know revel have made some completely new kits recently but the majority are old and getting on a bit now. The fact that they continue to produce all these kits is the reason why their selection of models surpasses tamiya but the quality does not. The great thing about tamiya - and most of the jap companies come to that - is the 'freshness' of their products. We are consistantly being given brand new models from these guys at the rate of what? about 1-2 car kits a month and we all know how good quality they are.

modelfan1
02-09-2002, 08:47 AM
Who makes Initial D models?
and what in the hell is it ?

:apoke:Putting a model together is a lot different than building a
model. Making something look and fit better than it did before gives me a sense of accomplishment,if you just want to paint it, glue it and put it on the shelf just buy a diecast it's easier !!

And why can't they stick to either 1/24 or 1/25 scale
Is there that much difference between those two scales ??:argue:
I don't look to see what scale something is before I buy it,scale doesn't
matter,if I want it !

:evillaugh I've been looking for Tamiya Jaguar Racing Saloon for
awhile but it's just too pricey but the search continues and it doesn't matter if there is a motor in it because I'll put one in it :what:

Mike

Murco
02-09-2002, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by flyonthewall
But arent most of Revels kits from the toolings of other manufacturers which Revel have brought over the years (mostly monogram since they bought them out)?
Revell and Monogram merged in 1997 but they had been "partners" under the Binney and Smith company for many years. There never was any other companies.
I know revell have made some completely new kits recently but the majority are old and getting on a bit now.
Actually, looking through the 2002 catalog they offer 31 plastic kits. Of those only 13 are older kits (pre-1995)
The great thing about tamiya - and most of the jap companies come to that - is the 'freshness' of their products. We are consistantly being given brand new models from these guys at the rate of what? about 1-2 car kits a month and we all know how good quality they are.
I'd rather have 4-5 a year with fully detailed drivetrains as thats all I could build anyway. I'm not one who builds just to fill my display case or create a collection.

:finger:

turbos86
02-09-2002, 02:22 PM
FYI, Initial D is a Japanese Anime/Comic about street/touge(mountain road) racing

1/24 and 1/25 scale are really different....try putting parts from either one on to the other...that's what I'm trying now, Revell 1/25 engine in a Fujimi kit...it doesn't look right

I've had bad experiences with Revell so I don't like them much.

the bottom line is...if you want high quality kits and have the cash, get Tamiya, if you don't care, wants a challenge or have no $$$, buy Revell.


On one personal note: I hate how Revell make their boxes so thick and big! Storage is a pain in the a**...but who keep boxes anyways..hahahaha

primera man
02-09-2002, 06:38 PM
Having built both brands, Tamiya is in a class of there own IMO.
I will buy a model based on what i like, not by the brand. (I'm looking at the whole kit in general when saying this)

There is alot more work in a Revell kit but with time you can get a very nice looking kit.
There range is great as is there after market parts.
The ones i have done have turned out will and i'm happy enough with them.
I just think that with todays standards Revell could be making there kits a whole lot better then they are. There is way to much *flash & molding lines*. There fitment of parts can be very poor and there decals are still crap.
They have come a long way, but still need to improve alot more to get close to Tamiya.
Maybe for the average person who does the odd model now and then they dont mind buying a kit like this.....but when i'm forking out good hard earned money on kits i expect them to be worth what i paye for them.

Macka
02-11-2002, 05:39 PM
Well, being that I'm still working on my first model (which is Revell) I don't have a lot of experience to back up my opinion. I just bought a Tamiya kit, to see what you guys are all raving about. It looks sweet, and looks like a quality kit. I can't wait to build it..but I was shocked that it cost 2X wht Revell kits cost, and dismayed that there's no engine :(

And you gotta hand it to Revell for having engines. Building the engine on my current kit was a challenge, and I must say was a lot of fun :D

And for $12 a pop, I don't mind a little bit of extra filing, or "challenge"

ales
02-12-2002, 02:12 AM
I was browsing the Revell website yesterday... They have a lot of very nice-looking *1/24* kits. I would love to do some of those, although shipping from the USA is more than the price of the kit! Still, they have lovely muscle cars (I don't like muscle cars, but these are classics!). Like the Mustangs... I've never built a Revell kit (other than the formula one kit from Revell Germany and hated it to the guts), but I think I will soon. :)

darrenj
02-12-2002, 11:37 AM
Originally posted from Murco
Ease of assembly - Tamiya owns this category. I have never had a warped body or kit that needed help with parts aligning. Revell, while still closing the gap, does exhibit the occasional fitment problems.

I beg to differ here slightly. I am almost finished building the Tamiya Ferrari F12000 1/20 scale and the rear engine cover (cowl) was (is ) hell on wheels to put on, it is quite a tight fit!!!, some filing was required..
I do love Tamíya overall because I am into F1 motorsport, and the after market products for Tamiya is VAST (www.hlj.com!!)
I hope I got your name right Murco
http://www.angelfire.com/de2/darren/brab.html

PL_NYC
02-12-2002, 08:53 PM
I like american cars so I would vote for revell, especialy that they all have engines.

Purpura Delujo
09-04-2002, 04:27 AM
I know I'm bringing up an old forum but hey, i missed out on putting in my opinion :D . I mostly buy Revell, as I love to build engines, I dont care about fitment or molding, because preperation is have the model making! Revell have a HUGE range, and thats what I like. They make rare and collectable models and limited runs. I also like Tamiya, as they make good quality Japanese performance cars where as Revell dont. But I am the same as Pman when it comes to my favourite, I buy for what the car is, not what the brand of kit is.

Honoturtle
09-04-2002, 04:57 AM
Originally posted by tazdev
what does JDM stand for?
haham I didn't know this either! Thanks Jay!
Pretty much my opinon on these two companies are the same as Murco

hrmodeler
09-04-2002, 05:09 AM
Murco, I see that are from US. Most US member like mostly US cars so R/M suits them best. But here in Europe most of people (I think) like more Tamiya kits because they cover cars which are driven in Europe too. :-))
Tamiya have big range of race cars and I like that very much.

Here I can't find most R/M kits, only Revell Germany which isn't so good as R/M kits. Some models are same in both companies, some not.
Tamiya had engines in his older kits, and that is only thing which I miss in their kits.

For me, I will always look first on Tamiya kits even they are expensier.

erix7
09-04-2002, 07:48 AM
Originally posted by Murco
I know how much many of you regard Tamiya models, as do I, but I think many of you are giving Revell a bad rap that is uncalled for. For fun and education let's look at the products in direct comparison...

* Fidelity - Hard to argue against Tamiya. The bodies and overall castings are crisper and near perfect in every dimension but Revell has closed the gap tremendously over the past 5 years.
Point - Tamiya


Hold it for a second: as far as I'm concerned Tamiya is notorious for exagerating
body dimensions and shapes to make a model look 'better'.
I've seen Tamiya car kits where bodies are some 5% to 10% wider than the original. That's not what I
would call "perfect in every dimension".
Revell/Monogram may not get it perfectly right all of the time but if they are really wrong
they correct their mistakes (ProModeler Charger).


When I want a quick shelf model or a JDM car, I pick Tamiya. When I want to kick butt and make peoples jaws drop, I go with Revell!!

Tamiya make very nice crisp kits but their drive to minimize the number of parts is hurting
the overall quality. I like the kits they made in the mid 80ies best (959, 300ZX, RX-7)
because those are loaded with accurate details and fiddly bits.

For JDM cars Aoshima is almost as good as Tamiya.

How come Hasegawa is so often ignored on this forum when kit quality is discussed ?
Hasegawa doesn't have a particularly large selection but they did some very fine
fully detailed 1/24 car kits over the years (Ferrari 328/348, Porsche 944/968, Jag XJS and so on).

My 2 Eurocents, :hehehe:
-- Eric.

MaxSE
09-04-2002, 09:26 AM
compare the tamiya tires (tyres) to the revell ones.....enough said! IMO i think my cars perform better on rubber than plastic!! the hell with revell!:flipa:

sugarcaddy
09-04-2002, 09:44 AM
I like both manufactures for different reasons and hate them for completly different reasons! LOL
Revell has a very big selection of cars and most if not all of these have engines with US aftermarket kits to superdetail the engines and other areas of the car. But Revell doesn't do a good job on their tires/axles, most of the kits I have built the wheels don't fit right or don't ride right. Tamiya has a much better wheel/axle combo as well as aftermarket wheels that US markets seem to forget or just have lowrider type wheels?! Revell does have some problems with decals-but decal setting solution works for me.
Tamiya has well Japanese cars and some Euro cars. Not my fav. subject matter and at 100% to 120% mark up from a typical Revell kit I rarely buy one. But Revell could learn a thing or two from Tamiya such as crisp bodies, parts, crystal clear windshilds. Not to mention the extras that Tamiya has like window masks, screen for grill work, detailed wheels and crisp decals.
In a perfect world we could combine the two and and a kick butt model selection with perfect fit and all the extras to make whatever we choose to do. But then we would get bored and complain about how the Reviya company does this and that to piss us off!! :flash:

Have fun is what I say, and build what you like!!
:frog:

Scott

XR6 Martin
09-04-2002, 09:53 AM
Originally posted by erix7


Hold it for a second: as far as I'm concerned Tamiya is notorious for exagerating
body dimensions and shapes to make a model look 'better'.
I've seen Tamiya car kits where bodies are some 5% to 10% wider than the original. That's not what I
would call "perfect in every dimension".
Revell/Monogram may not get it perfectly right all of the time but if they are really wrong
they correct their mistakes (ProModeler Charger-- Eric.

Although the Tamiya wheels look good, they are generally also overscale.

Oh and the last Revell kit I bought came with rubber tyres....

jaykit21
09-04-2002, 11:54 AM
Actually, looking through the 2002 catalog they offer 31 plastic kits. Of those only 13 are older kits (pre-1995)

Yeah, good point kinda...Import tuning and racing in the states is big and growing every day. Of their 18 'new' kits, only one or two are of related Japanese cars. Revell missed the boat badly w/ their current line-up. Even the kits that are supposed to be released will still be in 1/25 scale. If they do ever produce more 'tuner' cars, nobody outside the US can get them @ a reasonable price b/c their distribution system is awful. WTF is that? And the fit and finish on Revell cars is crap. I mean, why the hell are the wipers molded into the freakin' windshield on the ITR? Why do the decals look like shite? I know why... their parent company is Binney and Smith, who are also the producers of the popular Crayola Crayons. Probably the same technology used in production. Tamiya all the way. No questions asked. I use my Revell ITR to put fireworks in and entertain myself. :D

Sorry for the ranting but I hate Revell cars (lots of bad experience w/ them) :D

freakray
09-04-2002, 11:57 AM
XR6 Martin,
They were rubber or they were vinyl?
I have found that Revell kits tend to have vinyl tires, and vinyl is plastic, it is just a soft grade and does look close to rubber......

Ray

XR6 Martin
09-04-2002, 02:27 PM
Originally posted by freakray
XR6 Martin,
They were rubber or they were vinyl?
I have found that Revell kits tend to have vinyl tires, and vinyl is plastic, it is just a soft grade and does look close to rubber......

Ray

Actually, after having a second look at them you are probably right in saying they are a soft grade of vinyl, but they are a hell of a alot better than ones of previous years.
I think you'll find that the Tamiya ones arnt genuine rubber either? On the box it says "realistic rubber-like tyres" :confused:


Regardless, ill buy from whatever company if theres a model that interests me:bandit:
Plus in some ways I think its good to build a model with flaws, makes it more challenging:cool:

S Brake
09-04-2002, 05:36 PM
Revell models separate the men from the boys, but i'd rather be a boy and finish the model without finishing off my advil supply.

modelfan1
09-04-2002, 06:57 PM
:argue::dogpile::eshooter:
:angel: Mike

Purpura Delujo
09-04-2002, 09:18 PM
Originally posted by MaxSE
compare the tamiya tires (tyres) to the revell ones.....enough said! IMO i think my cars perform better on rubber than plastic!! the hell with revell!:flipa:


Dude, your models dont go anywhere, and if you are talking about your real car that has nothing to do with this topic....Who cares what tyre quality is like, at least Revell can make a good whitewall, i don't even think Tamiya extend their range to that. Your not going to sit there all day rubbing your models tires now...Are you?:bloated: :bloated:

Tricksterpan
09-04-2002, 10:21 PM
I go with most people, I just pick the car I want reguardless of the company, I like mainly foriegn cars so I build many more Tamiya than Revell. To me sometimes engines dont matter, just one more thing for me to screw up, but I still am new at this and trying to learn, so maybe it will change ;) anyway build whatever makes you happy.

MaxSE
09-04-2002, 10:55 PM
original post by lowriders4life:

Dude, your models dont go anywhere, and if you are talking about your real car that has nothing to do with this topic....Who cares what tyre quality is like, at least Revell can make a good whitewall, i don't even think Tamiya extend their range to that. Your not going to sit there all day rubbing your models tires now...Are you?

who care what tires are like!??!? let me ask you this: what is a scale modeller's ideal?...well if you don't know here's the answer: making the margin of real to fake as close as possible. from what i can observe the large majory of patrons of this forum try their absolute hardest to fullfill the above statement... getting to the point that i'm trying to make, tires are half the kit!!! another thing is tire detail is sureal on the tamiya/fujimi(aftermarket) rubber, revell doesn't even come close, if those black plastic rings are what they call a tire set... fawk ... oh and one more thing lowrider4life the example that i used for tire comparison in my original post was used in the figurative sence... you obviouly did not get it! :rolleyes:

ps: that's simply one of many aspects to where jap kits beat out u.s kits...there are many more but too many to mention. the best way to some it up: quality(tamiya) vs. quantity(revell).

Jay!
09-04-2002, 11:01 PM
I agree that it doesn't matter what the tires are made of, as long as they look like the real thing. If you can make plastic look like rubber, good on you!

I mean, we're trying to make plastic look like steel, aluminum, glass, etc., right?

Purpura Delujo
09-05-2002, 12:45 AM
Stress less! I do model making for a hobby, something to do...Something to keep me occupied, Most of us here aren't exactly a Pro Modeller (with the exception of a few). I don't particulary care what my tires look like, tread on a model is nothing to me...Oooo look, it has chucks of rubber/vinyl, how realistic. I am not a Pro modeller and I seriously don't care about the quality of my model, I buy it for what it is, not what the brand is. The last thing I have to say is that I don't care how good the quality of my model is now because i'm going to get rid of them eventually. I'm just putting in my opinion, and it simply is I dont care about quality.

Ranger_X
09-05-2002, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by snowboarder
Revell models separate the men from the boys, but i'd rather be a boy and finish the model without finishing off my advil supply.

No my friend, AMT models seperate the men from the boys. :D

I think that lightning I've been working on has taken about 5 years off my life :bloated:


Anyway, I think sugarcaddy summed up all my feelings with this:

"I like both manufactures for different reasons and hate them for completly different reasons! LOL"

erix7
09-05-2002, 03:43 AM
Originally posted by MaxSE
compare the tamiya tires (tyres) to the revell ones.....enough said! IMO i think my cars perform better on rubber than plastic!! the hell with revell!:flipa:

There's three types of model tires I know of:
- softened polystyrene, those will soften model parts over time and may damage
kit parts and decals in the box. Softened polystyrene may harden and crack over time.
- synthetic rubber, looks good when new but will turn whitish and crumble over time.
- vinyl, doesn't look as realistic as rubber straight out of the box but is harmless and will not age.
Oh and there's the solid wheel-with-tire variety of course :hehehe:

-- Eric.

sugarcaddy
09-05-2002, 09:04 AM
:eek:
How funny that I should get quoted!
I found another problem I have with Tamiya cars-if you F up the paint job on them you feel really bad because you spent $25-30 bucks on it as opposed to a $10 Revell I don't feel so bad when I screw up a paint job! Whats up with that??:finger:

Scott

Purpura Delujo
09-05-2002, 07:42 PM
Originally posted by Ranger_X

AMT models seperate the men from the boys. :D


My green 68 Stang was an AMT/ERTL, It was one of the best kits I have ever done, easy and quick assembly and very good fittings, quite good strength in the plastic and nice detailing! I had NO problems with it at all, besides I screwed up the paint just a lil....but I touched that up quite well......It hasn't broken at all in transport unlike my newer Revell model, which was made in China :rolleyes: Why can't they still make em in the US, like the good ol' days.

bvia
09-05-2002, 11:28 PM
Airfix/Heller kits seperate the assemblers from the modelers ;-)>
Bill
:bandit:

XR6 Martin
09-06-2002, 03:37 AM
AMT kits seem to be a mixed bag, the 97 Cobra I didnt have any troubles with, but the 95 Camaro the fit of the parts was pretty ordinary (in particular the body)

Murco
09-08-2002, 02:47 AM
Originally posted by MaxSE

that's simply one of many aspects to where jap kits beat out u.s kits...there are many more but too many to mention. the best way to some it up: quality(tamiya) vs. quantity(revell).

Ok, it seems a few of us didn't get the point of this thread. The model is irrelenvent, it's all in the builder.......
I have taken dog-pile kits and made national contest winners from them. I have also taken the most expensive, exquisite kits and turned them into dog-piles!
EVERY kit has it's good and bad points. It's up to the builder to either paint-up a pretty shelf-queen, or build a jaw-dropping contest monster.
Here is my latest $8.00 Revell kit's engine.........
:)
http://files.automotiveforums.com/uploads/388942Camengine.jpg
I look forward to seeing you all on the contest tables!:devil:

Murco
09-08-2002, 02:56 AM
Originally posted by ales
I've never built a Revell kit (other than the formula one kit from Revell Germany and hated it to the guts), but I think I will soon. :)
Most Revell-Germany kits are former Fujimi or Tamiya kit molds!

tazdev
09-08-2002, 03:27 AM
still not confident in my abiltiy to MAKE things fit without breaking them so - For now I stick with Tamyia or Veilside Aoshima kits

Murco
09-08-2002, 01:38 PM
Here's another Revell engine, albeit with some added detail. Wipe the drool from your chins!
http://files.automotiveforums.com/uploads/745037simplyawesome.jpg
Hmmm, must be the builder!!

Jay!
09-08-2002, 01:44 PM
:eek2: In what scale?Originally posted by Murco
Here's another Revell engine, albeit with some added detail. Wipe the drool from your chins!

Murco
09-08-2002, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by jay@af
:eek2: In what scale?

1/12, it's a Grand Sport conversion on a '67 Vette being built by Jim Drew - master builder! The heavily modified block and heads are the only kit pieces on the whole engine!

Jay!
09-08-2002, 02:01 PM
Wow! Did he have a hard time teaching ants how to polish? :eek:

ales
09-08-2002, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by Murco

Most Revell-Germany kits are former Fujimi or Tamiya kit molds!

Not F1 kits - no one else (AFAIK) makes 1/24 Formula 1 kits. And I cannot agree that most Revell (G) kits are former kits of other companies. There are some, but the majority of cars in 1/24 is their own tool (unfortunately). Trucks is another matter.

But I posted in this topic soooooo long ago and I sooooo don't want to argue. Just sharing information.
Alex

erix7
09-09-2002, 04:52 AM
Originally posted by Murco

Most Revell-Germany kits are former Fujimi or Tamiya kit molds!

Revell G reboxed some Fujimi and Aoshima kits and currently some Hasegawa kits as well,
but never reboxed any Tamiya car kits !

In fact it is the opposite: Tamiya sold some original Revell G kits in Japan ! (BMW 850i ao)
The only former Tamiya kits ever sold by Revell G are the 1/100 aircraft series that
sold through BEN.

Revell G can produce some very fine models, the BMW 850i series
being the finest examples I can think of.
Just wait until their new Polish factory is capable of making car kits, they already did
some of the best aircraft kits currently available.

-- Eric.

JBarry
01-07-2004, 07:14 AM
I have to give Revell credit for the tires on the 94 Impala SS Lowrider kit. I was amazed at the quality of the tires. The kit comes with 2 sets of tires and both sets were sweet. The tires were 'directional' having the need to install them with the thread going in the right direction. The rubber that they were made out of 'feels' like rubber to me. Maybe I picked the right kit. Revell tires rock.

In the wire,
J. Barry

hypertek
01-12-2004, 05:50 PM
When I was a kid I built Revell and Monogram models. Untill I discovered Tamiya models, I thought htey where the best thing in the world. Fujimi is cool too, I like the easiness of wheel options, but they lack engine/drivetrain/interior details.

Since im a import car nut, I perfer Tamiya/Fujimi. But I do got my eye on picking up the Revell Datsun 240Z and Datsun 510, but otherwise, any "import tuner" car that comes from Revell/AMT has to be "Americanized riced" out.... which makes me turn my head away.

StephenDeli
01-12-2004, 06:15 PM
I have recently built revells 2002 Camaro Anniversary Edition. The Body parts were so hard to fit. The Front fascia was way to big. Overall the model was a real pain.

I have never built a tamiya model yet. Although I do have an Enzo in stock. From what I hear Tamiya body parts fit better.

VnnyDaPooh
01-13-2004, 02:28 PM
Here's another Revell engine, albeit with some added detail. Wipe the drool from your chins!
http://files.automotiveforums.com/uploads/745037simplyawesome.jpg
Hmmm, must be the builder!!

I bow to the man who made this. Utterly superb!!!

And Murco, your engine was pretty bad ass too. :iceslolan

Renegade
03-30-2004, 10:27 PM
you guys are so funny. You all have the chance to get Tamiya model. But some of you cry over for Revell. But the wierdest thing is that I live in Slovenia, where we can get almost every Revell kit there is. And guest what. Some of us gather together and order for about 40 Tamiya and Fujimi kits :iceslolan from Japan. In the end one we must pay twice price for one kit - postage and things. The Revell kits here have normal prices.
Here the Revell doesn't sell much/any of Japan exotic cars. So the only way is Japan.

Although Revel makes clear and red plastic for lights. I know at least for Fujimi, that I must paint the lights.
Also I think all Revell kits have engine detail.
Revell have some spooky :screwy: putty and some colors. I thing Tamiya or even Model Masters rule here.

I had many laughs when reading this thread. You have Tamiya and want Revell (not all of you, of course :icon16: ), and we got Revell and want Tamiya.

Good thread though!

supermod04
03-31-2004, 01:08 AM
i have never had the 30$ some $$$$ to spend on tyamia or japanesse kit, revell, number one, i like them, detail is good, the ease to assemble is nice, they make a large variety at a nice price. i have pretty much stuck to revell, i have had a few AMT they ;ack some detail, i have a 70s AMT elcamnio and i was surprosed int he detail, it has a 402 big block supercharged, nice suspension, i have had the kit for about 5 years and it was assembled but it has been in boxxes so it was time to fix it, it has some nice mufflers those were first to go! got some chrome tips and strait piped it out the side. shaved handels ect, minor body work.

chacal
01-04-2005, 04:00 PM
Can I add a new opinion to an old thread?

I have never built any Revell USA model. I've built Revell-G, Tamiya and Heller and I think Revell and Tamiya have good and weak points.
Heller is the worse: prepare to use your hair drier a lot... large pieces are awful, you have to twist and turn them to fit. Also, prepare the putty!
Revell-G is releasing models from companies it bought, like ESCI. OK, maybe poorer quality, but if it wasn't this re-release I would never be able to buid the 131 Abarth I've bought today!
So I tend to agree you must buy the car you want and take your time building it and improving it's details.
Of course, some of us haven't got the time (or is it the skill :smile: ?) to build a good model... and what do I get? A bad model from a so-so base and a so-so model from a good base! I will keep on buying the cars I like, building as I can, improving my techniques and having fun... regardless of T-R fan wars!

Chuck Kourouklis
01-04-2005, 09:12 PM
Y'know, here it is like, um, 3 years after the fact - why am I still hearing Marvin Gaye?

:sly:


On a couple of the points raised in this thread (some of them, years ago) -

Revell established a 1/25 scale tendency by the early sixties. A bit earlier, Monogram settled on 1/24 as its standard scale. There's a certain elegance to 1/24 as it applies to the English system of measurements; a foot scales down to a nice, neat half-inch, and the early Monogram boxes remind you of this. Which makes it all the more curious that 1/25, which makes more sense as a metric conversion, would become America's scale of choice - while the more English-friendly 1/24 has worked out to be the international scale.

Anyway.

Odyssey Partners united Revell and Monogram under one organization in the late '80's. Suddenly, you saw the talent that had brought you all those defining '80's Monogram kits developing new 1/25 tooling for Revell. Not to mention that Revell had been repackaging some Fujimi tooling around that time.

Add to this Revell/Monogram's tendency to mix and match tooling under each other's masthead, and no wonder it's perceived as an inconsistency - particularly now that Revell heritage pieces like the old Lincoln Futura and Austin Gasser are now boxed as Monogram kits while definitive Monogram efforts like the Big Deuce and NASCARs are now sold as Revell kits.

There are exceptions (especially with post-1992 Monogram tooling), but the general rule of thumb is that Revell's 1/24 kits have roots in Monogram (or German Revell) tooling, while the 1/25 kits are Revell originals. For certain, American scale-fascists have cowed Revell/Monogram to such a degree that any new Revell tooling is cut in 1/25 scale (and apparently, new Trumpeter tooling, too!). As a 30-something modeler who grew up when Monogram was the only serious game in town, it doesn't make much sense to me, either. But me that as it bay.

Also note that Revell/Monogram is no longer a Binney & Smith company. Rumor has it that it's now under the guidance of some hobby industry veterans and enthusiasts, and the new Revell kits reinforce this.

I thought the opening post, from all those moons ago, was excellent, but I would nitpick a point or two - mostly in the parts count of Tamiya kits. Stuff like the street WRX, 350Z and Honda Fit are the occasional 70-piece exceptions, but even their curbside comp cars push 120 parts or more these days. That had a bit to do with why a Tamiya curbside took the SA ranking in 2002; a curbside with parts more numerous and better engineered will defeat a relatively simplified kit with an engine and fit issues.

There was a nice, polite thread about Japanese manufacturers a couple weeks back, but when Layla's Keeper and I, um, sorta hijacked it, it took a turn highly germane to this thread. If you've been reading this thread, you might find this link interesting, too.

http://www.automotiveforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=332210&page=2

Ansel Marrow
01-05-2005, 03:04 AM
i belive also mainly its the builder of the model that makes it.

sofar, im going with tamiya. maybe all of their kits arent like this, but the hardtop skyline 2000 has an engine bay, and it comes with flat out lots of good stuff to make the model really convincing looking. Im comparing this to the datsun z revell kit, which, unless you modify it in some way, looks really bland. i like revell alot, but i think tamiya has a nicer finish.

Chuck Kourouklis
01-05-2005, 11:52 AM
Agreed - but Revell's closing the gap. I've pointed out elsewhere that their new Focus is one of the most cleanly processed kits they've done. There were only modest parting lines and almost no sink marks on mine. Now if only the damn thing sat down on its suspension a little better...

One other irony I forgot to point out, relative to a point raised in the first post - Jim Drew's stupendous, awe-inspiring, legendary Grand Sport lost out to a Tamiya Xanavi Skyline in a recent (I)PMS gathering. This may be a case where the kit manufacturer might have swung a decision in the opposite direction, because the photos certainly don't communicate any other area of superiority in the winner.

I'm not the only one who thinks the (I)PMS's credibility in automotive judging has suffered as a result...

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