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Old 12-19-2003, 12:40 PM   #1
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Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

At the request of one of the Integra forums' more senior members, KrNxRaCer00, I am creating this sticky thread in here specifically as a questions/suggestions box.

If you can't find an answer to your the question you have in mind in here, feel free to post it. The senior members of this forum have already volunteered to answer these questions as best as they can.

The purpose here is to prevent all kinds of different threads from popping-up, all asking similar questions. A question will be asked here once, and answered here once.

Members seeing threads with questions that might be better suited to be in here, feel free to re-direct the poster to this thread.

Any suggestions you have for the forum or for this thread, feel free to post it in here.

PLEASE: NO stupidity, and NO flames in here...I, or another mod will just delete them.

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Old 12-19-2003, 04:52 PM   #2
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Carrrnuttt I am so glad to see a mod back in this forum. This should haelp alot.
Thankyou.
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Old 12-19-2003, 07:32 PM   #3
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Re: Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

Quote:
Originally Posted by whtteg
Carrrnuttt I am so glad to see a mod back in this forum. This should haelp alot.
Thankyou.
haha...i got tired of it, so i PM'd him.

anywho...on topic.

FAQ:

Q: "what i/h/e set-up is the best and how much hp should it free up?"
A: honestly, it depends. for the money, most people are going to say that a generic CAI, with a DC sports header and some custom bent 2 1/4 in piping w/ ur choice of muffler would be the CHEAPEST way to go while still freeing up the most power possible.

however, if ur state is strict about the CARB stickers, then u'd most likely want to choose either the AEM or INJEN or bigger brands like that for ur intake, and brands such as Tanabe, Greddy etc for ur exhaust.

on our integras, we'll prolly only free up around 10-12hp IF WE'RE LUCKY (all depends on ur motor condition etc...) from these simple bolt-on's.

if u've got the money, go w/ the bigger names and keep it legal. if ur more strapped for cash, then go the cheaper route.

Q: "cheapest power"
A: The cheapest way to add power is nitrous, plain and simple. a 50 shot for around $500 shows gains that no other will for that price tag.

if u don't like the idea of happy gas going through ur motor, then turbo would be ur next bet (i'll answer more about turbo's in the next FAQ.)

if u STILL don't like that idea, then the standard i/h/e/cams/ecu would be the way to go. u'd only see gains of around 20-25hp for about $2500 tho, so its definately VERY expensive.

Q: "best teg for turbo"
A: ah...love this q. basically, the b18c1/b18c5 (gsr/itr) are both high compression motors, therefore making high boost numbers more difficult. they can usually handle around 6-7 psi (prolly only 6 tops on the b18c5), with the right tuning. the b18b1/b18a1 are cheaper to turbo and see higher boost numbers. with their lower c/r, u can boost 10-12 psi safely, and not have to build ur internals etc (still is a good idea to, but u have more room for error than w/ the others.)

Q: "how much hp stock/1/4 mile times..."

2nd gen tegs: ls/gs/rs (b18a): 130hp/125trq (until 91), then 92-93 came w/ 140/126trq. usually run low 16's to high 15's (depends on drivers)
gsr (b17a1): 160/116
fastest gsr made, runs around a 15.1-2
3rd gen tegs: ls/gs/rs/special edition (b18b1): from 94-96 142/126, 97-up 140/126 (obdI vs obdII) usually run high 15's, low 16's
gsr (b18c1): 170/128 obdI (94-96) run around 15.2-3/obdII run 15.3-4
type r (b18c5 97-up): 195/130 14.7-9

if any of these trq numbers are off, let me know, i was doing this off the top of my head.

Q: "can my car beat this car..."
A: honestly...there are too many variables to figure out (tire condition, motor condition, drivers skill, good tank of gas etc...).

Q: "differences between the ITR and GSR"
A:lets start w/ exterior:

type r front lip
type r wing
shaved side moldings
5 lug
bigger brakes
97-98 only offered in champ white w/ white rims
00-01 came in black/yellow w/ gun metal rims
stickers
muffler
1/4 in lower stock vs stock
no sunroof
lighter hatch

interior:

carbon fiber gauges
carbon fiber center console
type r shift knob/boot
type r storage lid
type r floor mats
recaro seats

motor:

b18c1 block w/ p&p b16 head
better flowing intake
2 1/4 in exhaust
molybdenum coated piston skirts
larger throttle body (62mm)
LSD tranny
shorter gear ratios
higher redline (8400)
lighter, stronger flywheel
raised c/r to 10.6:1

hrmmm...thats the basics atleast...


Q: "integra chassis codes?"
A: 2nd gen Integra coupe DA9
2ng gen Integra sedan DB1
2nd gen Integra GSR DB2
DC2 refers to VTEC 2 door Integras
DC4 refers to NON-VTEC 2 door Integras
DB8 refers to VTEC 4 door Integras
DB7 refers to NON-VTEC 4 door Integras
Rsx is dc5

Q: "wut is VTEC and wut does it do?"
A: Posted: Thu Oct 23, 2003 7:11 am Post subject: VTEC: What it is

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Daryl Krzewinski

VTEC is Honda's trademarked acronym for Variable valve Timing and Electronic lift Control. Put simply, it's a method of directly altering the cam profile that valves "see", so that the optimum grind can be utilized at either high or low rpm. Honda currently has three different VTEC systems for sale in the U.S., but the primary differences are: level of complexity and design purpose. Since the high performance version is the most oft discussed, I'll describe it:

The high performance VTEC system, which made it's debut in the Acura NSX, is also available on the Integra GS-R, Prelude VTEC and del Sol VTEC. Using radical cam grinds to improve engine horsepower is certainly nothing new, but the problem lies in driveability. The very aspects of a cam grind that work so well for horsepower (high lift, long overlap, etc.) do so by creating an ideal situation for a high air flow at high engine speeds. Unfortunately, what works well for that situation has the inverse affect on low speed torque and driveability. Perhaps at one time or another we've all heard the V-8 hot rod that has a cam grind so radical that it can't even maintain an idle, and the driver must constantly goose the accelerator to keep the engine running.

What to do? How about two different cam grinds, each optimized for a different half of the rpm range. Honda achieves this with a rather simple method.

Picture, if you will, one cylinder of a DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder engine. There are 4 cam lobes, each directly operating a valve (two intake, two exhaust). The VTEC system has two more cam lobes, in between each pair of the other respective sets. These two can then be our high-rpm lobes, while the other four are the low-rpm lobes.

The low-rpm lobes in this case then actuate the valves through a set of rocker arms, so that the mechanical connection can be broken if desired. The third, high-rpm lobe also has it's own follower, but it is in a freewheeling state, flopping around and not contributing anything. As our engine accelerates through it's rev range, it passes through the power peak of the low-rpm lobes. Then, at the engine speed and throttle position programmed into the computer's memory map a signal is sent which electronically opens a spool valve, which then directs oil pressure to a mechanical sliding pin. This pin locks the rocker arms actuating the valves to the follower on the high-rpm cam lobe. As this grind is steeper and higher then the other four cams it will supersede them. In a few milliseconds you have completely altered the valve timing and the engine's power band begins anew.

The obvious benefits to this are the high-rpm power associated with a radical cam grind, but with little or no negative affects on low speed idle, driveability or torque. Just changing a fixed timing engine to a cam grind equal to the high-rpm one used in the VTEC would produce an engine which is utterly gutless below 5000rpm.

Clearly, this system is intended to improve performance first, with little effect elsewhere. But such a system can be used differently, as that in the Civic VX. In this instance, the low-rpm lobes give a staggered timing, where one valve opens fully but the second cracks just a bit. This is to induce a high swirl rate into the chamber to promote better combustion, which, when combined with a computer-actuated lean burn helps to achieve high mileage. The high-rpm lobes in this engine are a more conventional grind associated with a sixteen valve 4-cylinder, to provide extra power in cases of passing or merging. The VTEC system used in most Civics (EX, Si and the del Sol Si but NOT del Sol VTEC) is a little closer to that in the NSX, etc. The difference being that this system is vastly simplified and operates on the intake valves ONLY. The exhaust valves are actuated conventionally, which reduces the effect somewhat from the full VTEC system. This is partly to reduce costs, and partly because this engine is a SOHC, and the complex system of rocker arms to actuate sixteen valves is prohibitive to the full VTEC system. The VTEC on the Accord is close in design to that on the Civics as well, optimized more for a smooth power delivery then high horsepower.

The negative effects? Very few, really. Obviously it's very expensive, with many complex parts involved. The biggest drawback is the limitation to only two "modes" of valve timing. Most engineers are still seeking ways to obtain unlimited variance of the valve timing, so that it can be optimized to any engine speed, not just high or low rpm. BMW's system approaches this method with a completely different method of varying the valve timing. It is almost infinitely adjustable *within it's range*, but alas it has a much smaller envelope between the two extremes of it's variability than is possible with the Honda system.

(from clubintegra.com)

well, thats all the basic FAQ's i can think of, feel free to add things guys.
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Old 12-19-2003, 11:36 PM   #4
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Wow that is a nice list KrNxRaCer00

Seeing how I get so many emails ,PM's and AIM'S about nitrous I will explain about that so that hopefully any questions can be answered here

Q: How does nitrous work?
A: Nitrous supplies the extra oxygen needed to burn extra fuel, which creates more hp. Nitrous is 2 nitrogen atoms and 1 oxygen atom held together by a chemical bond. When the nitrous enters your combustion chambers, the heat makes the nitrogen release the oxygen that is needed to burn the extra fuel that is being supplied.

Q: What are the different types of Nitrous kits?
A: There are two basic kinds, 1 being "DRY" and the other being "wet".
Lets start with the "DRY" kits. A dry kit is a nitrous kit that supplies nitrous only into the intake tract of the motor, usually the intake pipe. The extra fuel that is needed to create the extra hp is supplied by the stock fuel injectors, the dry nitrous kit increases your fuel pressure to accomplish this. These kits are the easiest to install, but provide questionable power gains. They are good for up to 75hp.

Now lets talk about a "wet" nitrous kit. A wet nitrous kit supplies both nitrous and the extra fuel together in one nossle. This nossle mixes the nitrous and fuel together so that it becomes a mist of nitrous and fuel. Now a big difference between the dry and wet kits are that the wet kit can be upgraded to unlimited amounts of hp. There are two types of wet kits also you have a single nossle fogger and you have a direct port kit. The single nossle kits are the most common kits used, it is one nossle that is installed into your intake pipe, no closer than 6". The direct port kits are ( for our application) 4 nossles that are plumbed into your intake manifold. One nossle goes in each runner on the intake manifold. The single nossle foggers are good for 25-80hp, some have pushed alot more, but above 80hp you should really get a direct port kit it will be safer because it distributes the nitrous more evenly to the cylinders.

Q: what does NOS stand for?
A: NOS is not a term used to describe nitrous. NOS stand for Nitrous Oxide Systems, which is a company owned by Holley that makes nitrous kits. PLease reframe from typing in NOS for anything other tan Nitrous Oxide Systems topics. You can use N20 or Juice or spray etc.

Q:How big of a shot can my car take?
A: Depeding on the condition of your motor, you can go by a 20hp per cylinder calculation. This is for motors that are in good condition. So for tegs it would be 80hp. Now my personal opinon on this is that anything above a 55 hp shot of nitrous should be a wet kit, but alot of people will disagree and alot will agree. I just feel that the way the dry kits supply the extra fuel is questionable. My

Q: Nitrous and high C/R
A: Nitrous loves high C/R. Unlike turbos and superchargers nitrous can be used on motors that have high compression ratios. But it must be tuned more percise, than if you were using a lower c/r.

Q: What do I need to do to prepare for nitrous?
A: The absolute things are non-platinum sparkplugs, doing a compression check of the motor, and making sure you timming is set to the stcok specs. For anything 50hp and under you need to also retard the timming 1 degree. For 50-75 you need 1-2 degrees retard and one step colder sparkplugs, and for 80-100 hp you need 2-4 degrees retarded timming and 2 step colder sparkplugs. Some things that will need to be upgraded to accomidate the nitrous better are an aftermarket intake sytem, header, exhaust, motor mount inserts, new clutch, better tires. For hp mevels greater than 75 you also need to install a high performance fuel pump, Walbro makes a nice 190lph and 255lph and they are rather cheap in price but good quality. An adjustable fuel pressure rgulator will also be needed with anything above a 75hp shot.

Q: Best plugs for nitrous.
A: I have found that NGK plugs are the best plugs for nitrous. Some people like the ZEX brand but I perfer the NGK ones myself.

Q: Where should I install my nossle?
A: for the single nossle wet kits you should install it approx 6" from the throttle body. For Dry kits you can mount it up to 6" away from the throttle body and as far away as the airfilter box (if you still have one). For the direct port kits you need to make sure you get a trained person to install these for you unless you ahve the knowledge to do it your self. A direct port kit installed wrong can cause serious problems.

Q: Do I need a bottle heater?
A: If you are going to be using the nitrous more than 2-3 times in one night then yes. Or if you are going to be using it when the outside temp is low then yes. If you have a wet kit the you absolutely need one. It is needed to keep a constant bottle pressure. Bottle pressure should be no lower than 800 psi and no higher than 950-1000 psi.

Well that is about all the time I have for now but this post will get longer and more information will be added. If anybody has any questions that they need ansered just PM me and I will answer them both here and pm you back with a answer.
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Old 12-20-2003, 11:21 PM   #5
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This may not be as technical as the previous two posts but, it is something I think we can all agree on...

THERE IS NO "BEST" SOUNDING EXHAUST.

it all comes down to personal preference when it comes to an exhaust note.
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Old 12-21-2003, 04:52 PM   #6
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And also this isnt the for sale or looking to buy section, but if you must post one in here, atleast put as much info as possible including location, details, price and maybe why its for sale.
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Old 12-21-2003, 09:46 PM   #7
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I read a post that made me think of this.

Q: What do you consider rice?

Thats been asked a lot, so just search. Its also hard to answer because everyone has a thousand different things that could constitute ricey, and not everyone will always agree.
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Old 12-22-2003, 09:46 AM   #8
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Re: Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

Seems like if you have a lot of $$ and soup up your car will not consider rice? And ppl that have tried so hard to earn "some" hard $$ for their car will consider rice? Engine parts do cost a lot guys.......
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Old 12-22-2003, 06:13 PM   #9
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thanks guys, this thread is really helpful for all the newbies.

I think that another thing that is important and should be touched on is engine heads. (gains, types, what is best, etc. etc)
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plans: exhaust, system very soon,cams?, b16 head?, sway bar?,suspension? TURBO?


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Old 12-24-2003, 05:07 AM   #10
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Q. Which turbo is best for my car?

A. Most people on this forum agree that a custom made kit is the best way to go. It is usually cheaper and offers more performance gains than a bolt on kit if done right. However, if you are insistent on purchasing a pre-fab kit, then Drag or RevHard have some respect around here whereas Greddy doesn't seem to get any at all.

Q. LS/VTec or Turbo?

A. LS/VTec won't touch a turbo in the power department. The amount of money that goes toward an LS/VTec conversion could be put to use in a turbo kit that will ofer much more performance gain. The low compression of the LS makes it turbo friendly over its VTec siblings. If you have money, LS/VTec AND Turbo will be nice.

Remember, forced induction is the only real way of ADDING horsepower. Everything else basically FREES UP horsepower that your engine was already capable of producing but was just restricted from doing so. If you find any inaccuracies in my post please correct me, but without any criticism or rude flaming please.
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Old 12-28-2003, 08:44 PM   #11
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Re: Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

A question people PM me a lot is........
Q: Why do you think the LS/v-tec is bad for reliability?

A:If it was all that great, Honda would have done it in the first place. Submitted for your approval, my thesis on why LS/VTEC is a bad idea.

What is LS/VTEC?
Why would Honda do that?
What is R/S?
Why a low R/S is bad for reliability
What is power, exactly, and how do Hondas make it?
B Series, by the numbers
How VTEC works, and why it lives at high RPMs
Why it doesn't all fit together


What is LS/VTEC?


A quick tutorial for anyone who doesn't already know.

LS/VTEC is using a B18A or B18B block (referred to as an LS block, even though it was found in the RS, LS, and GS) and mating it with any of the DOHC VTEC heads- the B16A, B17A, or B18C. The principle is to use the larger displacement of the LS block (READ: higher torque) and mate it with the high end power of VTEC. I'm also sure you've heard of CR-VTEC, which is a very similar idea. It uses the B20Z block of the CR-V (NOT the B20A of the Prelude Si, for reasons that will become obvious later) to achieve the same effect, only on a grander scale. What you end up with is an engine commonly referred to as a "Frankenstein" setup, and it's all the rage these days.


Why would Honda do that?


So why in the world would Honda put us in such a situation- having to build these incredible motors all by ourselves? Why would they knowingly decrease displacement and torque in a car being manufactured to be faster than its lower-trimmed breathen?

Look at it, too, from a manufacturing standpoint- Honda is already making the higher displacement B18A and B blocks (blocks are identical, only difference was in the head), so why go to the extra time and expense of developing and manufacturing a separate block, especially if it will decrease output?

The answer is easy: R/S.


What is R/S?


R/S is the abbreviation for rod to stroke ratio. It is the ratio of the length of the connecting rod to the length of the piston stroke, or the distance the piston travels from the top to the bottom of its stroke. As the ratio gets lower, the amount of stress on engine internals increases exponentially, killing long-term reliability. The higher the number is, the slower the piston is traveling, killing power output.

The ideal R/S is 1.75:1 (Three cheers for the B16A, at a near-perfect 1.74:1!).


Why a low R/S is bad for reliability


A low R/S means the rod will be closer to a horizontal angle on its upstroke. This means that more of its force will be pushing the piston horizontally, rather than vertically. What does this mean for your engine? Two things.

1. There will be more stress on the sides and in the center of the rod, rather than on its ends, leaving the rod more vulnerable to breaking. Picture a straw. This is no special straw, just an ordinary drinking straw. Is it going to be easier to bend this straw by applying pressure onto its ends, or at its center? Now think of your poor connecting rods.

2. There will be more stress on your cylinder walls. Once again, the rod is pushing the piston at a more horizontal angle- right into your cylinder walls, rather than up and through them. The risk here is double: A. Putting that piston right through the cylinder wall. B. The cylinder wall will actually flex under the pressure, causing the shape to turn from a circle to an oval or oblong shape. This causes the loss of the seal created by the piston rings. What happens? A small amount of oil could slip past into the combustion chamber. Bad things happen from here: The oil gets combusted, leaving nasty carbon deposits in your combustion chamber and exhaust ports- not a good thing for flow or valve sealing.

It's also important to note that as the RPMs increase, so does the amount of stress on your engine's internals.


What is power, exactly, and how do Hondas make it?

Warning: Once you see this, you will never look at horsepower and torque readings the same again, especially after you think about it.

P= (TR)/5252

P= power, in horsepower
T= torque, measured in lb/ft
R= Engine speed, in RPMs

Therefore:

Horsepower= (torque x RPMs) / 5252

Try it- pull out a dyno and see what you get.

So from this, we can conclude that if we increase torque or engine speed, we will get more power, right?

Remember that, it's important...

Now how do Hondas make power? Our tiny little 1.6-1.8L engines aren't exactly oozing spare displacement and creating gobs of torque, are they? Hondas make power through revving, and revving high. So why does everyone place so much emphasis on creating torque? It's because all these bolt-ons you see advertised won't raise your redline, but they will increase torque. There's nothing wrong with squeezing every last ounce of torque out of your engine- you should. But trying to get torque from more displacement in a Honda is like trying to fill a swimming pool using a squirt gun. You'll never get enough for it to be useful.


B Series, by the numbers


Let's take a closer look at the B series engine blocks.

In the B18 blocks, Honda increases displacement by using a larger crank and increasing stroke (the B20Z also has a slightly larger bore, which is bad for reasons I won't go into here). This, of course, lowers the R/S, since the rod length remains (almost) the same.

B16A:
Rod length: 134 mm
Stroke: 77 mm
R/S: 1.74:1
Displacement: 1587.12 cc

B17A:
rod length: 131.87 mm
Stroke: 81.4 mm
R/S: 1.62:1
Displacement: 1677.81 cc

B18A-B:
Rod length: 137mm
Stroke: 89mm
R/S: 1.54:1
Displacement: 1834.47 cc

B18C:
Rod length: 137.9 mm
Stroke: 87.2 mm
R/S: 1.58:1
Displacement: 1797.36 cc

B20A (Older Prelude Si)
Rod length: 141.7-142.75 mm
Stroke: 95 mm
R/S: 1.49-1.50:1
Displacement: 1958.14-2056.03 cc

Now you see two things: Why Honda decreased the displacement from the B18A-B to the B18C, and why the B20A is widely regarded as a not-so-great engine. Honda decreased the displacement in the B18C by decreasing the stroke, improving the R/S. This allows the B18C to rev higher, and (Hey!) increase output.

Making sense? I bet you can see where this is going. But wait, there's plenty more...


How VTEC works, and why it lives at high RPMs


A quick crash course for anyone unfamiliar with VTEC:

VTEC stands for Variable Valve Timing and Electronic Lift Control. The premise is that at low RPMs and at idle, a less aggressive cam grind is necessary to prevent "loping." Ever hear a pro drag car staging up at the gates? Sounds like it's about to stall. It's because he's running aggressive camshafts, and since the cam is spinning more slowly at idle, the intake valve is still open after combustion has completed. That's what causes loping. At higher RPMs, a more aggressive grind is desirable. The idea is that you want to cram as much air and fuel mixture (A/F) into that combustion chamber as possible, so that when it's ignited you get as grandiose an explosion as possible. So what is good at low RPMs is bad for high RPMs. So what do you do?

If you're Honda, you invent VTEC. What VTEC does is simply to employ different cam grinds at different RPMs. A less aggressive grind at low RPMs for a smooth idle and low to mid range power, and a more aggressive grind up high to produce that high end pop. At a strategically placed "VTEC crossover point," the camshaft switches grind from the less aggressive to the more aggressive.

What determines this point? Hours and hours dyno testing and tuning. If it is set too low, the more aggressive grind will kick in early, bogging down the engine (think "loping" at 3500 RPM). Too high, and the engine is missing out on valuable time it could be spending with the VTEC engaged. So all those fools who spent on a VTEC timer running stock camshafts just so they could get their VTEC to kick in earlier- they're idiots. They just cost themselves a ton of midrange power. The stock crossover point is optimized for stock camshafts.

So when is a VTEC timer necessary? Easy- when you're no longer running stock camshafts.

If you want big power all motor, you go with one of the big players in the cam game- Toda Spec B and C, or Jun Stage 2 and 3, and you accept no substitutes. All (or at least 95%) of the 225+ all motor whp B18s are running these camshafts.

How does this relate to VTEC crossover point? Well, the VTEC grinds on these cams are so aggressive, that the VTEC point needs to be moved up- way up- usually to 6500-7000 RPM. These cams will also make power to 9500+ RPM (READ: Built motor). Run these in conjunction with high compression pistons (at least 10.5:1), and you'll have yourself an all motor wonder. And this, friends, is where torque in Hondas comes from.

Why it doesn't all fit together
So here's what we've learned:


The LS/VTEC suffers from a bad R/S, due to the fact that it utilizes an LS block with a R/S of 1.54:1.
A bad R/S is bad for the engine, especially at high RPMs
Hondas make power through revving, and high power through revving higher, high compression, and aggressive camshafts

Because of its R/S ratio, it is not recommended that you rev an LS/VTEC past 6750 RPM on stock internals- the redline of a stock B18A-B. With a fairly built bottom end, it is still not recommended that you rev an LS/VTEC past 7800 RPM.

As we just discussed, in order to get any considerable power out of an engine, aggressive camshafts are a must. In order to get any benefit from aggressive camshafts, the ability to rev the engine high is a necessity. What good is VTEC if you can only use it for the top 1000 RPM of your powerband?

LS/VTEC is a fad, and I predict that it will be all but a pleasant memory in a few short years. As soon as kids start snapping rods and putting pistons through cylider walls, they'll realize how important good engine geometry is. Add that to the fact that they're running stock cams (because it's all their engine can safely handle) and getting burned by kids running Todas, or Juns, and they'll wish they had just stuck with their trusty B18C. Like I said, if it was all that great, Honda would have done it in the first place."
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Old 01-03-2004, 08:20 PM   #12
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wow, i read that same article....
(if ur going to copy/paste an article, atleast give credit to the real author plz and edit out parts that ppl have already covered "what is vtec")

i'd have to disagree tho w/ u. i don't think of ls/vtec as a bad thing at all. has honda ever released a turbo motor from the factory? yet, how many ppl would agree that is the #1 way to produce power from our small motors.

jus because honda didn't do it, doesn't mean it isn't right. the ls/vtec can be a reliable motor IF u have it put together by someone who knows their hondas. IF u do check-ups/maintence on the motor OFTEN. it can last a long time if u do it correctly, or u could blow it w/ in a couple of months if u do a shit job.

really, don't knock the ls/vtec, it isn't jus a "fad" its too strong of a motor to be that.

foxfai:

rice has too many variables. u defend that ppl don't have the money, well if they didn't spend $200 on neons, then thats $200 saved. they go out and spend $1000 on the ugliest rims possible, then another $100 for a spoiler straight off of the boeing line-up. these ppl still are spending money, so that IS NOT a defense for them.
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Old 01-04-2004, 11:00 PM   #13
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This is where I chime in and tell everyone here how useful this thread was This is the newbie place I guess, so why not just put a whole GS-R engine in a LS? Are there any limiting factors (other than money ;-) ) that would make it difficult to put a GS-R engine into a LS? Just thought I'd ask, flaming to a minimum please.
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Old 01-04-2004, 11:21 PM   #14
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Re: Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 95IntegOwner
This is where I chime in and tell everyone here how useful this thread was This is the newbie place I guess, so why not just put a whole GS-R engine in a LS? Are there any limiting factors (other than money ;-) ) that would make it difficult to put a GS-R engine into a LS? Just thought I'd ask, flaming to a minimum please.
not that difficult, but...why not jus pick up the gsr to begin with?

each has a ton of potential, and the ls will handle higher boost numbers on the stock motor, but the gsr will end up being quicker in the end (with more money.)

really...its jus wutever u'd like...turbo with a budget, go ls. turbo w/ no budget or all motor w/ no budget, then go gsr.
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Old 01-04-2004, 11:37 PM   #15
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Re: Re: Attention!! F.A.Q.s thread...

Quote:
Originally Posted by HondaIntegraXSI
A question people PM me a lot is........
Q: Why do you think the LS/v-tec is bad for reliability?

A:If it was all that .......

You have lost some respect on this article copy and paste is fine but credit needs to be given to the oringinal person like KrNxRaCer00 said.

p.s also "A question people PM me alot is....." ? No ofense but seeing how you have been a member here 2 months I find it hard to imagine that you have to deal with 1/4 of the pm's and email ppl like me and KrNxRaCer00 do. My Also this is not a flame just an opinon.



And to add usefull info....

Q: 4-2-1 vs 4-1 headers

A: 4-2-1 headers give low to mid rpm power and the 4-1 give mid to high rpm power basically. So in a racing situation you will only be in the lower rpm range in 1st gear then it will all be high rpm range, correct? So which one would you want? Now 4-1 headers will take away some low end tq but it willnot be anything drastic, but if you are the type of pewrson who does alot of stop and go driving I would think about going the 4-2-1 route.

Q: Ceramic coated vs Stainless Steel

A: The ceramic coated headers weigh less and disipate heat better. The SS headers are heavier, but they have that "bling" look. As far as power gains they are about the same I have not seen anything showing a significant difference.
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