The Lost Car owner (many car questions!)


ChuckLeeNorris
12-15-2009, 03:26 PM
Hello everyone! Okay so I really suck hard when it comes to vehicles, I have pretty minimal knowledge but I do know some stuff. I have a lot of questions to ask, I'm not even sure where to begin so I'll just write what I have on my mind at the moment:

- What makes a car die after x amount of miles? (why will a car only last x miles? Is it the engine? Frame? What?)

- If you're at lets say 200,000 miles and you install a new engine, would it be like starting over back to 0 miles and your car will last another 200,000?

- What exactly happens when the frame "rusts?" How does a car die from the frame rusting? (I've heard this before but I donts understandsss..)

- Can you install a different vehicle's engine? For example, put a mustang's engine into an f-150?

- BIG QUESTION: You know how older cars cost a lot to repair because the parts for that car/year are less available, right? Can't you just upgrade to newer parts? For example, take a 1995 F-150 and put in a newer engine, like say a 2010 F-150? Then repairs and etc. won't cost so much because the parts are more current and available?

- Let's say you have an old vehicle at x miles and it finally died from so much mileage. What can you do to revive it and make it basically new? And can you put in all newer parts or do they have to be for the same model/year?

Please gimme lots of good answers and suggestions! I'm trying to understand more but cars are harder than computers =]

'97ventureowner
12-15-2009, 04:05 PM
Hello everyone! Okay so I really suck hard when it comes to vehicles, I have pretty minimal knowledge but I do know some stuff. I have a lot of questions to ask, I'm not even sure where to begin so I'll just write what I have on my mind at the moment:

- What makes a car die after x amount of miles? (why will a car only last x miles? Is it the engine? Frame? What?)
There could be a number of reasons. The biggest is lack of preventative maintenance. Others include the engine going bad, frame rotting out,accidents, etc. Some vehicles of the same model can go over say 300,000 miles, while others that were probably not taken very well care of will only last 100 to 150,000 miles. Also environmental factors come into play. Areas of the country that experience weather extremes tend to have shorter vehicle lives.

- If you're at lets say 200,000 miles and you install a new engine, would it be like starting over back to 0 miles and your car will last another 200,000? Basically no. Everything else on the vehicle still has 200,000 miles on it and most parts have a definite lifespan and will not last another 200,000 miles.

- What exactly happens when the frame "rusts?" How does a car die from the frame rusting? (I've heard this before but I donts understandsss..)
A frame rusts when exposed metal comes into contact with something that causes rust. mostly road salt. In areas of the country where road salt is used, frame rotting is a big factor in shorter lifespans for vehicles.Also certain components experience a shorter life span such as gas tanks, brake and fuel lines, etc. What happens is the rust weakens the metal frame and causes weak spots that are unsafe and pose a danger to the occupants of the vehicle. Rear frame supports are a common area that rust out and pose a severe safety concern as the car will not track straight. ( I had a 1971 Impala that this happened to.)

- Can you install a different vehicle's engine? For example, put a mustang's engine into an f-150?
In most cases yes, but in the example you listed it may not be a good idea. Truck engines are generally built "heavier duty" as they have more demands put on them and need the extra strength and power. By using a weaker car engine you limit the truck.s potential and can damage the engine.

- BIG QUESTION: You know how older cars cost a lot to repair because the parts for that car/year are less available, right? Can't you just upgrade to newer parts? For example, take a 1995 F-150 and put in a newer engine, like say a 2010 F-150? Then repairs and etc. won't cost so much because the parts are more current and available?
Most of the time it would be too expensive or the availability of parts to fit in said vehicle is very limited. Vehicle manufacturers change parts on a regular basis so finding parts that will fit can be a challenge, and using a much newer engine in most cases may not work because of the associated electronics and parts needed to make it work would be too costly. It probably v=can be done in some cases but you better have a big wallet to do so.

- Let's say you have an old vehicle at x miles and it finally died from so much mileage. What can you do to revive it and make it basically new? And can you put in all newer parts or do they have to be for the same model/year?

Please gimme lots of good answers and suggestions! I'm trying to understand more but cars are harder than computers =]
In most cases you can use other parts from other years. That is called interchangeability. There are manuals and computer software that list which parts can be interchanged between models . Generally many parts can be interchanged when the model stays the same for a period of time. To revive a vehicle you can rebuild or replace the engine and transmission, the front end,service the cooling system and replace any questionable items, go through and check and replace any electronic items that are questionable, and possibly go through and replace worn out items in the interior and exterior of the vehicle. That can "revive" your vehicle and buy you some more time to use it.

ChuckLeeNorris
12-16-2009, 12:06 PM
Wow thank you so much! I feel like I've learned a lot just from reading your post and looking up some things. I have a few more questions:

I got a 1995 F150 (V6, I think this is 140 HP), I'm thinking about installing a supercharger and a cold air intake. I'm not too familiar with these parts, I only know the basic advantages so...

- Can you please list the advantages and disadvantages of these parts? (including their effect on gas mileage and the effect on engine/vehicle life)

- Is installation of these parts be expensive?

- Will the cold air intake have a huge positive impact on the supercharger since the supercharger emits more heat?

ChuckLeeNorris
12-18-2009, 08:45 AM
- what's the difference between a cold air intake and an intercooler? Which one is better for a supercharger? Would it be better to get both?

MagicRat
12-18-2009, 11:31 PM
Virtually all vehicles made in the last 30+ years have 'cold air intakes'. All this means is that the engine draws in cooler air from outside the car, instead of the warmer air that is found under the hood and around the engine. Cooler air is more dense, so it has slightly more power potential and a slightly lower risk of detonation (knock or ping).

The term 'cold air intake' usually refers to aftermarket kits which replace the stock air intake ductwork and filter with one that has less restiction and greater airflow potential.
This does not always produce more power. If the stock system has enough flow, then an aftermarket system will not give you any more power. However, engines that are modified for more power often benefit from such 'cold air intakes' as they can use the greater flow potential.

An intercooler is only useful when used with a turbocharger or certain types of superchargers. It cools the air that has been compressed by the turbo, making it more dense and produces more power, with less risk of detonation. Essentially it allows the turbo to work more efficiently.

In your case, if you really wanted a supercharger, have a look at a kit made using a centrifugaql type of supercharger, like a Paxton unit. They are comact and relatively easy to install. But they are expensive and decrease fuel economy a bit.

They may not have a kit specifically for your truck, but its possible one intended for a Mustang may be adaptable. Contact them for more details.

http://www.paxtonauto.com/

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