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Removing Fender skirts


moliva1568
11-08-2009, 04:11 PM
Before i go exploring and potentially break something, i thought i'd check here. How do fender skirts usually attach and how would i remove them to take off the wheel? is it something that has to come off completely or can be attached but moved outward to access the wheel? This would be for the Catalina. Thanks

MagicRat
11-08-2009, 09:44 PM
Look or feel behind the skirt. You should find a metal rod in the shape of a lever that fits in a slotted bracket.
You can pull on the lever to move it out of the slot. The skirt can then be lowered down and removed altogether.

moliva1568
11-09-2009, 10:43 AM
that was easy enough. now that they're off, i'm undecided as to which way i like it better. thank you as usual.

moliva1568
11-11-2009, 09:21 PM
With?
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/BG.jpg

Or without?
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/SNC00043.jpg

shorod
11-11-2009, 10:38 PM
It would appear that if you leave the skirt off you will need a chrome trim piece for the rear to by symmetric with the front.

-Rod

MagicRat
11-12-2009, 10:04 PM
Definitely, it's better with the skirts on.

To me, it seemed like 99% of these cars, in the '70's did not have skirts. Only a few top of the line models had them, which gave the skirted cars a certain uniqueness and elegance.

Selectron
11-13-2009, 01:06 AM
I vote for leaving the skirts on too; it looks a lot more elegant with them. There's something quite Art Deco about the streamlined lines, and the chrome detail is a typical deco touch too. I'd definitely keep them.

moliva1568
11-13-2009, 10:35 AM
after thinking it over, you guys are right. they go hand in hand with the wide whitewalls i plan on having. it does give it that finished look that helps set it apart. Now I'm stuck back at the wheel parts. I want wire wheels (dayton) but the company says they can't take the load of the car. i don't want some run of the mill rims so after some searching, i think i like a smoothie rim. i don't know if i want this one
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/centerlinesmoothie.jpg
not exact model but a visual of the wheel
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/mail.jpg

or the typical one
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/315704_w.jpg

from the photos i've seen, the first wheel seems to be a favorite of trucks and hot rods but something about it appeals to me. any opinions? size wise i think i'm going for 17".

wire wheels are my 1st choice and i found two "limos" which i'm sure are comparable in weight that are riding on spokes.
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/LIMO-02.jpg
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h151/livewire1568/108932546.jpg

MagicRat
11-15-2009, 12:59 PM
Some thoughts.....
1. Don't ignore the recommended load ratings of the wheels. Even if those limos run spokes, it does not mean they are safe to use for you. They may work fine under moderate use, but who knows? They may collapse under emergency braking or steering which would ruin your whole day.

2. Spoke wheels are unbelievebly difficult to keep clean, and, often, cheaper chrome spokes like to rust in the long run, especially in a more damp/cold/salty environment like NYC.

3. These smoothies have no cooling or vent slots. Brakes, especially for a heavy car like yours benefit from airflow. This is one reason why 99% of all wheels out there have some sort of vent/slot/spoke arrangement. Chances are, under normal driving, you will never notice any temperature-related brake fade, but it's a good idea to get something other than a smoothie.

moliva1568
11-15-2009, 03:53 PM
i def wouldn't ignore the load rating. i don't even know what that # is because the websites didn't say it. i emailed a rep and that was the response they gave me. oh well then, back to the drawing board it is then.

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