1998 2.0L SPI Escort - won't start


Aeryk
07-19-2009, 06:58 PM
I'll try to make a longer story short. 2 weeks ago, my wife experienced car dying on her just after gasing up and trying to start the car. Started engine again, soon thereafter 'Service engine soon' light went on. Have checked car using OBDII code reader several times. First time - P0193, P0190 and P0320. Took car for several drive cycles after, cleared codes before each cycle. Second and subsequent OBDII readouts - P0193, P0190 and P0340 (consistently following drive cycles; P0193 the first code with FREEZE FRAME DATA each time). Swapped my Fuel Rail Pressure sensor for another used one, car hasn't started since. Checked fuel pressure, old fuel pump (22 psi at best) replaced with another used pump (35-40 psi now), car still doesn't start. Checked this and other forums, found this one most useful, followed various suggestions, timing belt not broken, fuses all okay, hoses okay, fuel filter replaced, and am now ready to check spark tomorrow. Wondering if someone will journey with me on this one ?! Does someone have resistance values for a Fuel Rail Pressure sensor for a '98 Escort 2.0L SPI, as my code readout with car not starting is consistently now only P0193 ?

12Ounce
07-19-2009, 08:18 PM
I know the '98 is very different from my '97, but would offer the following fairly safe and easy thing(s) to do and check:
..The fuel rail is fairly easy to lift on this engine, two screws plus elect connectors ... fuel hose(s) do not have to be disconnected .. pull each injector and spray brake cleaner in the inlet end. at a sideways angle ... followed with compressed air (at an angle) if you have it. The idea is to lift any crud out of the inlet screen that may be there.
.. After reassembly and reinstallation of fuel rail ... attempt restart ... if engine fails to run: "listen" to injectors for "clicking" during cranking period. ??

mightymoose_22
07-20-2009, 01:26 AM
I assume the car is still cranking, just not starting?

Check the basics... though I know you have already changed some parts:

1. After cranking, remove a couple spark plugs and see if they look wet... just to make sure fuel is getting in there.

2. Though you replaced plugs wires, verify they are gapped correctly, wires are installed correctly (and tightly), and that each plug is actually firing.

3. Check your intake and air filter for any obstructions.

4. I'm too lazy to look them up, so if you haven't looked up the engine codes for yourself to be sure what they mean, then take the time to do it so you can be sure you addressing the right things. Don't take anyone else's word for it. The codes are on the net.

5... just for S&G... make sure your fuel safety switch didn't trip... should be in the trunk, and it should be in the down position.

Come back and tell us where things stand.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 11:00 AM
I know the '98 is very different from my '97, but would offer the following fairly safe and easy thing(s) to do and check:
..The fuel rail is fairly easy to lift on this engine, two screws plus elect connectors ... fuel hose(s) do not have to be disconnected .. pull each injector and spray brake cleaner in the inlet end. at a sideways angle ... followed with compressed air (at an angle) if you have it. The idea is to lift any crud out of the inlet screen that may be there.
.. After reassembly and reinstallation of fuel rail ... attempt restart ... if engine fails to run: "listen" to injectors for "clicking" during cranking period. ??


Thanks 12Ounce for your prompt reply. I guess I'll have to go and get some brake cleaner and a can of air, as I don't have a compressor. I think I'll also give these things a try after some of the basics that MightyMoose is suggesting in his reply. I figure checking to see if my plugs are wet would set some precedence. I'll get back to this as soon as I can. Just to confirm, are you referring to the injectors themselves or the inlet to the engine (perhaps an obvious question but an unfamiliar procedure to me) when you are saying to spray with brake cleaner? And why, in particular to use an angle, just to avoid too much cleaner in the inlet? Again, new stuff to me, but important that I get it right the first time, thanks.

12Ounce
07-20-2009, 11:41 AM
Not the inlet to the cylinder head/engine for sure ... in fact, make sure no debris gets dropped in there. May want to do some cleaning ahead around the injector bodies before removing them.

If you don't have compressed air ... just use the brake cleaner aerosol. And I am talking about cleaning the top/inlet of the injector itself... once you have removed them from the fuel rail and cyl head. I suggest an angle because it seems to be more effective than a direct stream into the inlet. No harm should come of this ... protect your eyes ... and no need to overwet the plastic injector body, definitely no soaking in a solvent bath or anything like that.

I would lubricate the o-rings of the injectors with petroleum jelly for easier reassembly.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 11:43 AM
I assume the car is still cranking, just not starting?

Check the basics... though I know you have already changed some parts:

1. After cranking, remove a couple spark plugs and see if they look wet... just to make sure fuel is getting in there.

2. Though you replaced plugs wires, verify they are gapped correctly, wires are installed correctly (and tightly), and that each plug is actually firing.

3. Check your intake and air filter for any obstructions.

4. I'm too lazy to look them up, so if you haven't looked up the engine codes for yourself to be sure what they mean, then take the time to do it so you can be sure you addressing the right things. Don't take anyone else's word for it. The codes are on the net.

5... just for S&G... make sure your fuel safety switch didn't trip... should be in the trunk, and it should be in the down position.

Come back and tell us where things stand.


Thanks for your prompt reply Mightymoose_22.

You are right, the engine is cranking, not starting.

I will check the basics, as you have suggested, and get back to your reply. I have not replaced my spark plug wires, but have replaced the plugs, as the originals were in the engine since we have owned it (gaps were looking large). Still, it didn't start. So, that rules out the plugs themselves.

I've also had the air filter replaced because it was dirty enough to do so. Still of no consequence.

I have checked the codes on a few different sites and they refer to an engine code of P0193 being a 'Fuel rail pressure sensor circuit high input...' issue and P0190 as a 'Fuel Rail Pressure sensor malfunction'. The suggestion based on the P0193 code was - 'Best bet is to measure the fuel pressure with a gauge. Then you will know if it is a bad sensor, or clogged pressure regulator.' That's why I have replaced my older (22 psi at best) pump, and swapped the Fuel Rail Pressure sensor for another. The thing I don't yet know is whether or not both my old sensor and the new sensor are working, and need some reference value for the resistance of the sensor to know if either is working (if any such value exists). Maybe I'm following the wrong path on this one, but the code P0193 and the above suggestions seem to lead me there.

The fuel safety trip switch is at the left kick panel in the drivers side, and I have been faithfully ensuring it is tripped when I need to relieve the pressure and reset when the pressure needs to be re-established. Have had a few misses on that one already in the process of checking fuel pressure at the schrader valve.

I am uncertain, even though I have a Haynes manual, whether or not my timing is out. I have gotten my timing belt cover off the car but ruined it in the process (cracks and lot of gouges trying to remove it). The manual seemed to just indicate to remove the bolts and voila!. Wasn't that simple. In hindsight, the engine mount was definitely in the way and was something I certainly didn't want to tackle, much to my own chagrin.

Now I'm cringing at my car and the 'road ahead' with only one jack, 2 jack stands and soft, uneven ground below the car in my driveway where the car is situated and it cannot really be moved because it will crank but won't start. On the bright side, my wife did get me a new 49 piece impact, deep socket set which should help with loosening the engine mount bolts. The trick will be, how to jack the engine up with such limited resources and not a lot of friends around to help out.

Figure I'll soon need to make a service call from one of the local mechanics to get me out of this bind.

Back to the timing. I was able to line up the camshaft pulley to TDC but cannot remove the crankshaft pulley as it keeps on turning. Perhaps if I replace the accessories belt this will provide more resistance to the engine easily cranking over. Help please on this front.

Although I am trying to approach things one step and process at a time, I am also getting a bit overwhelmed by it all, plus the time frame that keeps on getting extended without the use of this vehicle brings it's own frustrations and pressures on my wife and I - both working shift work with only one vehicle to try and make it work. We certainly cannot afford the costs that could present themselves should we hand over this problem to mechanics or dealerships who will probably get the job done sooner, but at a price above which we can pay. All the help we can get is certainly at a premium of appreciation.

12Ounce
07-20-2009, 11:53 AM
About that plastic front cover; it is a dog to get off for the first time ... and there is not much clearance around that motor mount. Once off, I usually do some triming around the bottom of the plastic to remove unecessary stuff. And those two lower fasteners ... I install two studs ... and forget them ... the two lower studs become guides, nothing else. I thereafter depend on only the four upper (two upper and two middle bolts) for fastening. The motor mount gets a bit of trimming with the rotary grinder/cut off wheel.

And this all makes the front cover, hereafter, easy to remove and install.

mightymoose_22
07-20-2009, 12:54 PM
I have not replaced my spark plug wires, but have replaced the plugs, as the originals were in the engine since we have owned it (gaps were looking large). Still, it didn't start. So, that rules out the plugs themselves.

Still... verify that you have spark. There could be other electrical issues preventing the spark from firing. Also, you mention in your reply that you had difficulty removing the timing cover. Have a look and verify that you did not inadvertently disconnect the crank position sensor or damage its wiring when you removed the timing cover. This would prevent spark.

I am uncertain, even though I have a Haynes manual, whether or not my timing is out. I have gotten my timing belt cover off ...

If the timing cover is off then you should be able to see the timing marks. You should see a timing mark on the crank pulley/damper that should align with a mark on the oil pump housing behind it, and when that is aligned the mark on the cam should be aligned with the mark on the head (if #1 is on the compression stroke).

The trick will be, how to jack the engine up with such limited resources and not a lot of friends around to help out.

Sounds like you have all you need... depending on how uneven the ground is. If you get a jack stand under one side so you can remove the wheel and access the crank, then you can use the jack to support the engine while you remove the engine mount.The engine does not have to be "raised"... just supported. Put a piece of wood between your jack and the oil pan and just lift enough to remove pressure from the mounts. You only need to remove the one mount, and it comes off pretty easily.

I was able to line up the camshaft pulley to TDC but cannot remove the crankshaft pulley as it keeps on turning.

You should find an access cover on the bottom of the engine that will open up into the flywheel area. Remove this cover and use a screwdriver to lock into the flywheel teeth. This will prevent the crank from turning and allow you to remove the bolt. Use the same method to torque things back into place.

I still haven't looked up your trouble codes... you only mentioned one of them. Were the others related to fuel pressure as well? Also, when you turn the key, do you hear the electric pump pressurizing the fuel rail?

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 02:46 PM
1. After cranking, remove a couple spark plugs and see if they look wet... just to make sure fuel is getting in there.

2. Though you replaced plugs wires, verify they are gapped correctly, wires are installed correctly (and tightly), and that each plug is actually firing.

The spark plugs are not getting wet, none of them. They don't even smell like gasoline. What next? Wires are installed, correctly. There is no spark in any of the plugs when taken out one by one, grounded on a manifold bolt or other good ground, when the engine is cranked over. Ignition coil issue?

12Ounce
07-20-2009, 03:00 PM
Did you have a chance to check out the crankshaft position sensor ... as Mighty suggested. If the pigtail is loose, or the sensor damaged when you removed the front cover ... there would be no spark.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 03:01 PM
I still haven't looked up your trouble codes... you only mentioned one of them. Were the others related to fuel pressure as well? Also, when you turn the key, do you hear the electric pump pressurizing the fuel rail?I have mentioned 4 codes in total, see my original post.
Codes P0193, P0190 and P0320 the very first three codes read after the problem occurred. Codes P0193, P0190 and P0340 were the codes read every time after the first reading was taken and then cleared for a driving cycle to recheck the codes. Code P0320 never showed up after the first time I read the codes.

SEE Diagnostic Trouble Code summaries below:
(from: http://forums.focaljet.com/team-tech/426113-all-dtc-ford.html)

1. P0193 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input (FRP) The comprehensive component monitor (CCM) monitors the FRP sensor circuit to the PCM for high voltage. If voltage were to fall below a calibrated limit and a calibrated amount of time during testing, the test will fail. FRP signal shorted to VREF or VPWR.
FRP signal open (gasoline only)
Low fuel pressure (NG only)
Damaged FRP sensor.
Damaged PCM.
High fuel pressure (caused by damaged fuel pressure regulator) NG.
A FRP PID value during KOER or KOEO less than 0.3 volts for gasoline or 0.5 volts for natural gas vehicles (NG) would indicate a hard fault.

2. P0190 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Malfunction (FRP) The comprehensive component monitor (CCM) monitors the FRP sensor to the PCM for VREF voltage. The test fails when the VREF voltage from the PCM drops to a voltage less than a minimum calibrated value. VREF open in harness.
VREF open in sensor.
VREF open in PCM.
Verify VREF voltage between 4.0 and 6.0V.

3. P0320 - Ignition Engine Speed Input Circuit Malfunction The ignition engine speed sensor input signal to PCM is continuously monitored. The test fails when the signal indicates that two successive erratic profile ignition pickup (PIP) pulses have occurred. Loose wires/connectors.
Arcing secondary ignition components (coil, wires and plugs)
On board transmitter (2-way radio)
The DTC indicates that two successive erratic PIP pulses occurred.

4. P0340 - Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction The test fails when the PCM can no longer detect the signal from the CMP sensor. CMP circuit open
CMP circuit short to GND
CMP circuit short to PWR
SIG RTN open (VR sensor)
CMP GND open (Hall effect sensor)
CMP misinstalled (Hall effect sensor)
Damaged CMP sensor shielding
Damaged CMP sensor
Damaged PCM
Harness routing, harness alterations, improper shielding, or electrical interference from other improperly functioning systems may have intermittent impact on the CMP signal.

Yes, when I turn the key, I do hear the electric pump pressurizing the fuel rail, and the current pressure reading for fuel pressure is between 30 -36 psi.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 03:11 PM
Did you have a chance to check out the crankshaft position sensor ... as Mighty suggested. If the pigtail is loose, or the sensor damaged when you removed the front cover ... there would be no spark.Yes, on a few occasions, including about 15 minutes ago, I checked the Crankshaft position sensor and I cannot even access it very easily from on top. A hose is blocking it and literally prevents me from being able to wiggle it or even damage or loosen it with anything, let alone my fingers, and I have small hands and skinny fingers. Accessing it from underneath is no small task either and I haven't been anywhere near it in that respect. Based on a suggestion to clean up this sensor connection to prevent dirt from making it work properly, I tried but gave up on first try due to the above reasons. The pigtail connector, however does not appear to be loose or even tampered with. As I indicated, I can't even get to it too easily, and it seems well protected from any tampering.

12Ounce
07-20-2009, 04:10 PM
It is a tough sensor to "touch" or see ... you might reach around by the oil filter to check. Maybe removing the oil filter would help. Removing the front cover helps.

Also check the cam position sensor (and pigtail) ... it is near the ignition pack.

mightymoose_22
07-20-2009, 04:34 PM
Well it sounds like an electrical problem. Spark is not firing and injectors are not spraying (if I understand correctly you have fuel pressure in the rail, but fuel is not reaching the cylinders).

My best guess for you now is that you need to check out the ignition module. This is an electrical component in the middle of everything that controls both fuel and spark. I am uncertain of how to test it other than to replace with a known good one.

That said- the same symptoms may occur if you somehow damaged the fuel cutoff switch. Though you verified it is in the down position, it will produce these symptoms if it is malfunctioning.

You should focus on those issues and leave your fuel rail and injectors alone. At this point, it might even help if you just focus on the spark issue. There is a good chance that if you fix spark, you will fix the fuel at the same time. Have a look at your diagram in the Haynes manual and look at the EEC and EDIS (and related fuses).

mightymoose_22
07-20-2009, 04:42 PM
Check out your relays under the hood... make sure the EEC is getting power.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 04:59 PM
Well it sounds like an electrical problem. Spark is not firing and injectors are not spraying (if I understand correctly you have fuel pressure in the rail, but fuel is not reaching the cylinders).

My best guess for you now is that you need to check out the ignition module. This is an electrical component in the middle of everything that controls both fuel and spark. I am uncertain of how to test it other than to replace with a known good one.

That said- the same symptoms may occur if you somehow damaged the fuel cutoff switch. Though you verified it is in the down position, it will produce these symptoms if it is malfunctioning.

You should focus on those issues and leave your fuel rail and injectors alone. At this point, it might even help if you just focus on the spark issue. There is a good chance that if you fix spark, you will fix the fuel at the same time. Have a look at your diagram in the Haynes manual and look at the EEC and EDIS (and related fuses).

Sounds like the next likely place to try. Thank you for responding once again Mightymoose.

Aeryk
07-20-2009, 09:26 PM
Check out your relays under the hood... make sure the EEC is getting power.

I've only ever encountered relay testing in conversation with a local mechanic, years ago. He tested, and I think he replaced the relay. I was not present to see the relay testing and this is fairly new to me as well. My Haynes manual gives a 'typical location' of the EEC power relay, but once located, how does one test it exactly ? Are you testing it with a continuity tester or a volt meter ? OHM/resistance ? My manual isn't that specific. It just says to remove it and have a dealer service department or repair shop do it.

Davescort97
07-21-2009, 02:23 AM
Just to back up for a moment. Did you check the fuel injection fuse and the engine fuse?

Aeryk
07-21-2009, 12:39 PM
Just to back up for a moment. Did you check the fuel injection fuse and the engine fuse?

Yes, they are both ok. In one of my earlier replies regarding checking things, I mentioned 'all' the fuses are okay. I failed to be specific and mention that this included under the hood, and dash inside the car. Thanks for asking.

mightymoose_22
07-21-2009, 03:43 PM
A relay is easiest to check by swapping with a known good one and checking the results. Otherwise, using a multimeter you just have to check that it is putting out power when it is supposed to.

If you have a junkyard in your area you might have some luck swiping an EEC and a relay for pretty cheap. Then you could save a lot of hassle troubleshooting. However, you never know if the junkers have good parts....

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