1992 GMC Truck Fuel Pump Install


chuckwagon101
04-08-2009, 10:44 PM
I have a 1992 GMC step side, short bed, 350 engine, Sierra, auto trans, factory air, factory exhaust, power steering.......

Three years ago the fuel pump went out. I have to work alone so I lowered the tank after draining and went through a lot of agony with floor jacks, supports, etc. but finally got the job done in 3 days.

The replacement was a Bosch fuel pump.

It went out today while I was at Sams stores. I got a pull home and it is in my driveway.

It started up once I got it home, but that is what it did the last time it went out, 3 years ago.

Question...should I check the ground first to make sure it is not getting intermittant ground or just do the job with a new pump?

Also, can I do this job by raising or sliding the bed after I unbolt it? I have heard war stories but no actual person that has done it.

Also, when moving the bed either up or sliding it back, isn't there a concern about wires that go to the tail lights?

I got lots of surprises when I did this job last time, I had no help or advice.

I am hoping that someone on here can make this job more simple.

I cannot afford the 500 dollar shop fee to have it towed and fixed.

Thanks for any ideas, suggestions or help of any kind.

Chuckwagon

Bob B
04-09-2009, 10:50 AM
Hi Chuck,
Partly depends on where you live.
There can be a lot of rust on some bolts although I've read that the bolts are better lately.
I live in California (lack of rust)
My 97 went through 4 pumps in 3 years before I learned to only use Delco/Delphi.
The original lasted for 105,000 miles.
I also have found that some opinions are that you shouldn't run below 1/4 tank for long. Especially in real hot weather.
I have done it both ways and prefer to lift the bed. After unbolting it two of us lifted it (3-4 could be better) and slid it back a few feet to make enough room to work.
There are wires back at the tail lights, and you need to take some little bolts off the filler, plus a ground strap there.
My truck also has a fifth wheel hitch which adds 8 bolts but they all came off very easy. Just needed to carefully align it before tightening any bolts.
Last time while it was off, I made a cutout above the pump so next time it will be easier.
One thing that added to some difficulty with lifting the bed was the installer of the fifth wheel hitch also added a trailer plug into the rear of the bed and no disconnects, but the wires were long enough to slide it back a few feet.
I also made a cover for the cutout from a piece from the self serve wrecker.
I have a tool box that covers it anyway.
I also have a new spare Delco pump and wrenches in the tool box.
My first went out while pulling the trailer on I-5 near Mt.Shasta.
Not a fun time, but at least I was able to coast completely into the fogline out of traffic.
Had to pay the several hundred dollars to have it fixed up there.
I found that a full tank makes it very heavy and is difficult to drain, which adds to the option of lifting the bed.

Good luck,
Bob B

chuckwagon101
04-09-2009, 11:20 AM
Thanks for the info Bob......I am waiting until after Easter to begin this project. Just too much to do right now and I have another vehicle.

How did you cut the access hole for future easy fuel pump removal?

Is there a way to cut the hole NOW instead of lifting the bed?

If you can think of ANYTHING else between now and Monday, a message here.....I check every couple of hours.

Thank you very much!

Chuckwagon

Bob B
04-10-2009, 09:27 AM
Thanks for the info Bob......I am waiting until after Easter to begin this project. Just too much to do right now and I have another vehicle.

How did you cut the access hole for future easy fuel pump removal?

Is there a way to cut the hole NOW instead of lifting the bed?

If you can think of ANYTHING else between now and Monday, a message here.....I check every couple of hours.

Thank you very much!

Chuckwagon

There is some clearance above the tank and with a lot of caution, and someone underneath watching, it could be done without removing the bed.
I did it while the bed was lifted mostly because I was cautious to not cut any lines or wires while doing it.
I very carefully 5-6 times measured the pumps location in regards to the frame. Transferred the marks to the box and drilled the four corners in prep to use the saw. Probably drilled from the bottom.
It's been a while, but I believe I drilled from the bottom.
If my toolbox was not in, I could give you the measurements.
An interesting side comment,,
The early Range Rover did not have a fuel pump hatch, But after a lot of fuel pump failures the dealers had a template available for where to cut.
My old 72 Datsun pickup has a snap out cover to access the sending unit on top of the tank even though the pump is still on the engine.
Bob B

Bob B
04-21-2009, 10:03 AM
Hi again,
Well, Have you done anything yet?
If so, how did it go?
Bob B

chuckwagon101
04-21-2009, 10:27 PM
Hey Bob! I got the pump installed.....decided to drop the tank.

I cleaned the outside and inside of the tank. It was real lightweight since I siphoned all the gas from the tank first. Got the clear siphon hose 3/8 at Lowes building supply.

I went with a Delco pump....also got the new harness. The old harness was somewhat corroded.

Everything snapped or plugged together very well. Even so, it took me all day to do the job.

I had no help at all but it was easy to maneuver the tank with my floor jack and a square of plywood for support.

Hardest thing for me was getting the filler tube to position correctly. Also the return hose was too short for some reason so I had to do a splice with bigger hose and some clamps...but it worked!

The truck runs great and I have put about 80 miles on it so far and it feels good to know I got the job done myself.

Just and aside....the cheapest place including a tow was 700 dollars!

Chuckwagon

Shemp12345
12-21-2012, 10:03 AM
Hi All, I've done this job alot! I find that taking the bed off may not be a option (i.e rusty bolts) in most cases. what I did is on the first bad pump I had removed the steel lines and went to 3/8 fuel line and cut them long so that when you drop the tank the next time ( and you will ) you will have enough clearance to see the top of the tank. I also remove the drive shaft for more room for my big body to sit uprite under the truck. I also use zip straps or tie downs to support the tank instead of a jack its easyer to lower that way. the hole job should take about 3 hours to do. good luck.

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