questions for racing


newdriver88
01-05-2009, 03:40 PM
quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdriver88
Help i would like to learn about the differance between the big block and the small block. Cus my bro is buying me a 350 small block hes racing a 410 big block. Can i still beat him on the track?????? :confused: :1zhelp:

Welcome to AF.
It would be a REALLY good idea if you were to start a new thread on this subject in the Chevrolet subforum in this Muscle Car section.

We try to discourage anyone resurrecting old threads like this one, especially when they want to discuss an unrelated issue.

The answer to your question is complicated but here goes:

Winning on the 'track' is partially dependent on the car set-up and the driver skill. So it may be better to ask if a small block has more power than a 410 big block. In that case the answer is...... maybe.

It depends on how each engine is built. It is easily possible to build a sharp 350 that can out-power many big blocks. However, in theory, the big block engine has more power potential because of a better cylinder head design, more displacement and a stronger reciprocating assembly than a small block. However, it is slightly heavier, physically slightly larger and is usually more expensive.
But, there are literally hundreds of variables when building an engine. If you take advantage of these variables when building a small block, it will out perform many big blocks.
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so if i put in better cams and chrankshafts etc. i could out preform him???
does that in clued boreing it out? if so is boring it out .30 oversized a good deal?

CassiesMan
01-05-2009, 04:47 PM
Huh? I are confuzeded.

Chiquae07
01-07-2009, 12:11 AM
blah double post.

Chiquae07
01-07-2009, 12:13 AM
Help i would like to learn about the differance between the big block and the small block. Cus my bro is buying me a 350 small block hes racing a 410 big block. Can i still beat him on the track?????? :confused: :1zhelp:

Welcome to AF.
It would be a REALLY good idea if you were to start a new thread on this subject in the Chevrolet subforum in this Muscle Car section.

We try to discourage anyone resurrecting old threads like this one, especially when they want to discuss an unrelated issue.

The answer to your question is complicated but here goes:

Winning on the 'track' is partially dependent on the car set-up and the driver skill. So it may be better to ask if a small block has more power than a 410 big block. In that case the answer is...... maybe.

It depends on how each engine is built. It is easily possible to build a sharp 350 that can out-power many big blocks. However, in theory, the big block engine has more power potential because of a better cylinder head design, more displacement and a stronger reciprocating assembly than a small block. However, it is slightly heavier, physically slightly larger and is usually more expensive.
But, there are literally hundreds of variables when building an engine. If you take advantage of these variables when building a small block, it will out perform many big blocks.

the new response with a new thread instead of posting in the same one
so if i put in better cams and chrankshafts etc. i could out preform him???
does that in clued boreing it out? if so is boring it out .30 oversized a good deal?


i think this clears it up a bit. he ended up copying the post to quote it, and copied matts sig as well. new question from OP above in bold.

have at em cassies :cheers:

CassiesMan
01-07-2009, 08:34 AM
i think this clears it up a bit. he ended up copying the post to quote it, and copied matts sig as well. new question from OP above in bold.

have at em cassies :cheers:


Ya know...I would, but I just can't. I just don't have the uumph to do it right now because I'm busy selling stuff, and getting that cash is more important than just going off on someone for failing at internet usage. Besides, its a legit question, if if the poster can't type to save his life.

No, I'm not turning over a new leaf to because its a new year.

I'm just to tired to be a jack ass right now.

newdriver88
01-07-2009, 12:20 PM
i am sorry dont mean to cause greif i was just wondering about racing.

ny brother is racing a 410 big block hes gonna buy me a 360 small block.
my questoin is can i beat him on the track then he replyed as u see now my question is:


so if i put in better cams and chrankshafts etc. i could out preform him???
does that in clued boreing it out? if so is boring it out .30 oversized a good deal?

MrPbody
01-07-2009, 01:26 PM
I saw this one elsewhere, too...

You are a bit "lost", eh? First, what BRAND of "big block"? A "410" is an old Mercury engine from the early '60s, with a moderate reputation as a performer, but not a very good one. Maybe it's a 402 Chevy, bored .040? Need to know MUCH more.

"Small block 360"? So you have a Dodge?

There are many factors that can make or break (figuratively AND literally) a "race" engine. We'll start there. Does the car operate on the street? If so, it is NOT a "race car", and the engine should not be a "race" engine. Street engines, though many are very powerful, have a different set of requirements to "live" than do race engines. In short, unless the car "lives" on a trailer (or in a garage, etc., NEVER to "see" street use) when NOT actually at a race track, it is a "street" car. It CAN be raced.

A smaller engine is capable of beating a larger engine IF all things are right. The weight of the car has much to do with that as well. So what kind of car is it? Your brother's?

Boring an engine .030" over is to refresh the shape and surface "finish" of a cylinder. Theminor amount of displacement increase is of little consequence when building a "race" engine. For example, 350 Chevy becomes 355 when bored .030". 5 cubic inches doesn't add up to much. However, the fresh cylinders, especially if they're "plate honed", WILL pick up power over worn bores. You will necessarily replace the pistons when boring, so another "advantage" can be realized by choosing the appropriate pistons.

Changing the crankshaft with one that has a different "stroke" can have a dramatic affect on performance, provided all the other components are equal to the "task".

Your questions are valid, but show a real lack of understanding of how engines and cars "work". I would recommend you search for the "Otto Cycle" engine, 4-stroke engine, all at the BASIC level, to gain an understanding of how the thing actually works. Once you've done that, your questions will be more palatable to those on sites like this one.

One thing, though. Don't fall into the "buzz word" trap. Throwing words around like "big block" and "small block", cam and crank, when you're not sure what those are, indicates a bench-racer mentality. Real guys don't do that. Magazine readers do. Get educated FOR REAL (you can't hanging around your "buds" unless they're professional automotive technicians). Once you understand these things, you'll have an overwhelming advantage over those that THINK they "know". Real racers RACE. Others talk about racing...

You're young enough you can learn and become very proficient at this, if you so desire. But don't think you're just going to wake up one morning and be an "expert". This field, like any other of technical content, is complex and takes education. It can be very reqwarding, though, when your car beats one soemeone says it couldn't!.

Have fun, and open up!

Jim

CassiesMan
01-07-2009, 11:52 PM
Oh, and if your brother is buying you a small block, have him contact me. I need some cash for a new toy.

newdriver88
01-08-2009, 07:11 PM
I saw this one elsewhere, too...

You are a bit "lost", eh? First, what BRAND of "big block"? A "410" is an old Mercury engine from the early '60s, with a moderate reputation as a performer, but not a very good one. Maybe it's a 402 Chevy, bored .040? Need to know MUCH more.

"Small block 360"? So you have a Dodge?

There are many factors that can make or break (figuratively AND literally) a "race" engine. We'll start there. Does the car operate on the street? If so, it is NOT a "race car", and the engine should not be a "race" engine. Street engines, though many are very powerful, have a different set of requirements to "live" than do race engines. In short, unless the car "lives" on a trailer (or in a garage, etc., NEVER to "see" street use) when NOT actually at a race track, it is a "street" car. It CAN be raced.

A smaller engine is capable of beating a larger engine IF all things are right. The weight of the car has much to do with that as well. So what kind of car is it? Your brother's?

Boring an engine .030" over is to refresh the shape and surface "finish" of a cylinder. Theminor amount of displacement increase is of little consequence when building a "race" engine. For example, 350 Chevy becomes 355 when bored .030". 5 cubic inches doesn't add up to much. However, the fresh cylinders, especially if they're "plate honed", WILL pick up power over worn bores. You will necessarily replace the pistons when boring, so another "advantage" can be realized by choosing the appropriate pistons.

Changing the crankshaft with one that has a different "stroke" can have a dramatic affect on performance, provided all the other components are equal to the "task".

Your questions are valid, but show a real lack of understanding of how engines and cars "work". I would recommend you search for the "Otto Cycle" engine, 4-stroke engine, all at the BASIC level, to gain an understanding of how the thing actually works. Once you've done that, your questions will be more palatable to those on sites like this one.

One thing, though. Don't fall into the "buzz word" trap. Throwing words around like "big block" and "small block", cam and crank, when you're not sure what those are, indicates a bench-racer mentality. Real guys don't do that. Magazine readers do. Get educated FOR REAL (you can't hanging around your "buds" unless they're professional automotive technicians). Once you understand these things, you'll have an overwhelming advantage over those that THINK they "know". Real racers RACE. Others talk about racing...

You're young enough you can learn and become very proficient at this, if you so desire. But don't think you're just going to wake up one morning and be an "expert". This field, like any other of technical content, is complex and takes education. It can be very reqwarding, though, when your car beats one soemeone says it couldn't!.

Have fun, and open up!

Jim


hes says hes racing a ford 410 big block and yes i do know what cams are i do know wat that much is.

hes says mine is also a ford hmmm now i am wondering does ford make a 360 small block??

maybe i am not in the right webpage to be talking a but dirt track racing i figured that this was were i could talk a but engines and learn but it seems that everyones is jumping down my throat not being rude.

newdriver88
01-08-2009, 07:18 PM
they are not that heavy wieght like 2600 lbs

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