1999 rear disc brakes hot after replacing


bheston
09-29-2008, 01:21 PM
I replaced my rear rotors and new pads, working fine but were about shot. I open the bleeder on the caliper when I pushed the calipers in so the extra fluid leaked out. Everything went fine but now after a 2 mile test run the brakes got pretty hot, smelled them when I got back, put some water on them and steam rolled off.

I saw a post where someone thought they had bad fluid and ran the calipers an extra time to drain more of the fluid, should I try that? I pulled one of the brakes back off and filed the edges of the pad where it slides and it got hot again after doing that. What did I miss?

Thanks guys!

silverado122775
09-29-2008, 01:33 PM
I replaced my rear rotors and new pads, working fine but were about shot. I open the bleeder on the caliper when I pushed the calipers in so the extra fluid leaked out. Everything went fine but now after a 2 mile test run the brakes got pretty hot, smelled them when I got back, put some water on them and steam rolled off.

I saw a post where someone thought they had bad fluid and ran the calipers an extra time to drain more of the fluid, should I try that? I pulled one of the brakes back off and filed the edges of the pad where it slides and it got hot again after doing that. What did I miss?

Thanks guys!

I do not know if this is the first time you have replaced brake pads or not, but it is quite common for pads to create an oder the first couple times they are used. The may need to be adjusted as well after being installed.

Good luck

bheston
09-29-2008, 02:21 PM
I do not know if this is the first time you have replaced brake pads or not, but it is quite common for pads to create an oder the first couple times they are used. The may need to be adjusted as well after being installed.

Good luck

I have replaced many sets of brakes before and the only time I ran into a similar situation was a collapsed rubber brake line on an older car that wouldn't allow pressure to be removed from the brakes and got that brake hot.

The brakes were definitely sticking on and getting them hot, when jacking up the truck I couldn't turn the wheels by hand.

j cAT
09-29-2008, 03:32 PM
I have replaced many sets of brakes before and the only time I ran into a similar situation was a collapsed rubber brake line on an older car that wouldn't allow pressure to be removed from the brakes and got that brake hot.

The brakes were definitely sticking on and getting them hot, when jacking up the truck I couldn't turn the wheels by hand.


The caliper when pushed back with a C clamp . then try to move the caliper out and in it should slide easy....


problems that I have found with these defective rear brakes:caliper pins need filing so that the grease will be able to fill hole and slide in out easy, the pads backing plate needs sometimes a severe filing so that the pads fit with just a small amount of snugness,and finally with the pistons of the caliper being pushed back open the bleed screw to dump out the old heated contaminated fluid...

after this is done slowly push down on the brake pedal [not to floor] until the brake pedal is good, then check to see that with you hand you can rock the caliper...

I have found OEM pads to be of the correct fit others fa getta about it...

rockwood84
09-30-2008, 09:47 AM
could be the caliper piston sticking. you can replace the seals for about $3.00 apiece.as the seals get hard as they age and will grab the piston and hold pads against the rotor.when you take the pistons out make sure they are not rough or nicked.you can sand them with a fine emery cloth.then wipe them down with brake fluid.

bheston
10-15-2008, 07:35 AM
Well I pulled the brakes back off, filed the pads down around all of the edges, bled the brakes again, and things appear to be working better now. They still got a little warm the first couple short trips but nothing like before. I also talked to someone else with a '99 Silverado that said every time he puts new rear brakes on they heat up the first time or two he drives, then work fine after that. These pads must not get built to a very good tolerance.

j cAT
10-15-2008, 09:26 AM
Well I pulled the brakes back off, filed the pads down around all of the edges, bled the brakes again, and things appear to be working better now. They still got a little warm the first couple short trips but nothing like before. I also talked to someone else with a '99 Silverado that said every time he puts new rear brakes on they heat up the first time or two he drives, then work fine after that. These pads must not get built to a very good tolerance.

Thanks for your result/findings...as I stated before these pads made by non OEM manufacturers is off on size...I use OEM on my vehicles , but many don't want to pay 120.oo +++ for them ...

with the pads fitting with slight resistance to slide , they will last much longer...and the ABS will respond correctly..


I have used both types on vehicles I have replaced pads on, and you should not see the heating of the pads until they seat....to stop this , sand the rotor faces with 120 grit sand paper in an circular motion...this will help greatly to seat the pads surface, to reduce the damaging efffects, that could be created by the hot spots..


easy on braking for a couple of hundred miles..also..
good luck...

zardiw
10-22-2008, 01:55 PM
I bet your rotors are glazed. Whenever you change pads/shoes, you need to roughen up the steel with some 320 grit. That helps the pads/shoes to wear in better............z

There's a tutorial here. It's 10 bucks, but well worth it

http://lighthouse57.com/brakes.htm

z

j cAT
10-22-2008, 02:26 PM
I bet your rotors are glazed. Whenever you change pads/shoes, you need to roughen up the steel with some 320 grit. That helps the pads/shoes to wear in better............z

There's a tutorial here. It's 10 bucks, but well worth it

http://lighthouse57.com/brakes.htm

z

I use 12o grit paper then wash with mineral spirits..

zardiw
10-24-2008, 01:07 AM
I use 12o grit paper then wash with mineral spirits..

120 seems a little rough....And Acetone will get them cleaner....but the concept is the same in both methods. Give the steel some tooth, and get those suckers CLEAN...........z

j cAT
10-24-2008, 09:57 AM
120 seems a little rough....And Acetone will get them cleaner....but the concept is the same in both methods. Give the steel some tooth, and get those suckers CLEAN...........z

on a rotor that has been in use the use of a 120 I find is best...if new rotor 320 is very good..

on your acetone use ,, this is the better degreaser and as a by product, you get a high on it...

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