Coolant Bypass Elbow and Tensioner Problem


RichBrew
08-29-2008, 10:21 PM
There is a 90 degree elbow from the LIM to the tensioner, and mine is leaking fluid. Will I have to remove the alternator and tensioner to replace this? or can it be done without going through all of that?

Scott

BNaylor
08-29-2008, 11:11 PM
There is a 90 degree elbow from the LIM to the tensioner, and mine is leaking fluid. Will I have to remove the alternator and tensioner to replace this? or can it be done without going through all of that?

Scott

If you have a GM car with the Series II 3800 engine either VIN "K" or "1" yes. See the procedure posted above.

patl411
09-03-2008, 11:55 PM
if i replace my belt tensioner are there other things that will have to be replaced? the part is 74.20 and labor is around 180, so id rather do this myself. is the only socket needed a 15mm?

BNaylor
09-04-2008, 07:54 AM
if i replace my belt tensioner are there other things that will have to be replaced? the part is 74.20 and labor is around 180, so id rather do this myself. is the only socket needed a 15mm?

Welcome to AF.

Since you will be removing the complete tensioner there are additional parts that should be replaced. I recall there are seals on the fittings where the heater hoses connect. 15mm socket is all you will need for the tensioner assembly bolts and for the alternator mounting bolts.

patl411
09-05-2008, 12:17 AM
the tensioner is stripped where the bolt that holds the pulley on goes, is it possible that i could gorilla glue the bolt in so that i can put the belt back on and drive the car to where my mechanic friend can do the work? i cant do the work at my house because its not allowed in my neighborhood, or possibly j.b. weld

BNaylor
09-06-2008, 01:23 PM
the tensioner is stripped where the bolt that holds the pulley on goes, is it possible that i could gorilla glue the bolt in so that i can put the belt back on and drive the car to where my mechanic friend can do the work? i cant do the work at my house because its not allowed in my neighborhood, or possibly j.b. weld

Yeah I see you are not in a good situation. I really don't know if Gorilla glue would work or even recommend its use. As long as the tensioner pulley is fairly secure and free wheels properly it may be OK but I really don't know for sure. If I were in that situation I'd probably use JB Weld since part of the plan is replacing the complete tensioner assembly. Good luck!



Also, for everyone's edification this is what the two elbows normally look like after tensioner removal. I've never had any come out intact. Digging the broken plastic parts out of the water pump outlet and LIM outlet where the elbows insert is not too fun either. :grinno:

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/lizzywiz/DSC02604.jpg

HotZ28
09-06-2008, 08:00 PM
Gorilla glue will not work in this case, JBweld will make it impossible to remove; you need to have a heli-coil installed for a permanent solution!

BNaylor
09-06-2008, 09:13 PM
You think the JB Weld would not work based on his predicament? Note that he is limited on what he can do since he lives in an apartment complex if you review his post. All he needs is for the pulley bolt to stay intact where it inserts through the pulley and then threads into the tensioner assembly. Then get it to a shop or a place where it can be worked on of course depending on how bad the coolant leak is.

I would replace the tensioner assembly in its entirety instead of messing with a helicoil. You can get a brand new Dayco tensioner assembly that comes with a new pulley for around $60. Other than that it looks like a tow to the shop.

HotZ28
09-06-2008, 10:00 PM
I agree, a new tensioner is the best solution and if he puts JB Weld on the threads, it would be mandatory. Of course, the tensioner pulley has a lot of pressure on it and before he could drive it, the JB Weld will need to cure at least 24-hrs in order to hold it in place. IIRC, a new tensioner should come with a new pulley & bolt, if not, he will need to purchase them individually.

BNaylor
09-07-2008, 11:31 AM
Yeah Bo the GM/Delco and aftermarkets if you get the complete tensioner assembly does come with a pulley. Here is the Dayco brand. I have installed a GM/Delco one and clearly recall the pulley on it. Same with the Goodyear brands.

JB Weld is good stuff but IMO it may not work in this situation but who knows for sure and probably won't hurt giving it a try based on his predicament. The problem is the pulley bolt is the fulcrum point where you move the tensioner which has a lot of spring pressure in order to remove or install the serpentine drive belt. I used JB Weld in situations where even after the 24 hour cure time it did not work. Long story on that.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/lizzywiz/dyc305301003.jpg
Dayco Tensioner Assembly

BNaylor
09-07-2008, 01:36 PM
Just a heads up but all posts from the Tips & Maintenance section in reference to the OP's issue have been moved to Buick Non-Specific. The tensioner thread has been locked. It was a WIP and I added some new pics to the thread but technically really not open for any further discussion.

To the OP. What year and model Buick is this?

maxwedge
09-07-2008, 02:51 PM
Remember there are 2 JB weld products slow set and fast set( you guys knew this), I have had better success with the slow set.

BNaylor
09-07-2008, 03:51 PM
The most common one found on shelves at the auto parts stores is the one with JB Weld part number 8265-S. The specified drying time is 15 hours before putting object to use and 4-6 hours before handling. But I would wait 24 hours minimum. I could be wrong but I don't think JB Weld should be used to jury rig critical belt drive system components. :2cents:

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