Can anyone identify these wheels?


dan89
07-31-2008, 06:37 PM
Just traded my ICW 17's for these 15's... anyone know what brand they are? 4 lug dual pattern...

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc231/DanTheManGT/cid_920.jpg

Have this odd logo on em

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc231/DanTheManGT/cid_157.jpg

Thanks guys :biggrin:

Christ
07-31-2008, 07:47 PM
The JWL logo is on pretty much all wheels.. I'm pretty sure it's an authentication logo, something to do with U.S. inspection and road legality.

Could be wrong tho, It's happened before.

dan89
07-31-2008, 07:52 PM
oh ok thanks

it also says VIA 690kg and 15x6.5 JJ if that helps anyone

Tony
07-31-2008, 07:58 PM
Nope, that just tells you the weight for something, not sure, and what size the wheels are, diameter and width.

I honestly don't have a clue what wheels they are, ofcourse I don't keep up with wheels anymore unless they are stock or some of the common ones everyone uses.

Christ
07-31-2008, 08:07 PM
google VIA, and ignore anything having to do with computers or chips..

(VIA is a through hole in a circuit board... )

dan89
07-31-2008, 08:18 PM
tryed that but came out with like 6000 hits... I'm just curious really

maybe when i get the tires replaced i'll have a look at the wheel and see if there's any sticker left

FrodoGT
07-31-2008, 10:15 PM
Yeah the first number is the load rating, followed by size.. dunno what the jj is though.

Tony
07-31-2008, 11:59 PM
I know its on a lot of wheels, just don't know the real meaning behind it. It always follows the dimensions.

CapriRacer
08-01-2008, 05:40 AM
..... dunno what the jj is though.


The JJ is the rim flange contour. Flanges come in different configurations, but as a general rule you don't have to worry about it when dealing with passenger car tires. They are pretty much all JJ.

Christ
08-01-2008, 03:55 PM
Hey... I didn't have to explain that one... good thing too, I didn't really wanna dig out my sears books.

BTW, some are also just "J" for whatever reason, but IIRC, they're the same flange dimension.

CapriRacer
08-02-2008, 05:47 AM
Hey... I didn't have to explain that one... good thing too, I didn't really wanna dig out my sears books.

BTW, some are also just "J" for whatever reason, but IIRC, they're the same flange dimension.


Ah .... Mmmm ...... Not exactly.

J and JJ are slightly different, but for practical purposes, they can be used interchangeably.

Christ
08-02-2008, 05:58 PM
isn't that the "lip" designation, telling you what type of weight to use? or soemthing like that... still haven't gotten those books out, don't really care enough, I don't use weights on my rims normally, I zero balance them.

CapriRacer
08-03-2008, 06:41 AM
isn't that the "lip" designation ........




Yes, it does tell you about the "Lip". The technical term is "Flange". The JJ defines the shape of the flange, but only where the tire and the rim interact.


.......


telling you what type of weight to use? or soemthing like that...

........




No, it does not tell you about the type of weight needed. The area where the weight is hung is outside the area defined by the "JJ".




...........

I don't use weights on my rims normally, I zero balance them.


Ah ..... Mmmmmm ....... - how do you "Zero Balance" them without weights?

Christ
08-03-2008, 09:22 AM
Have you ever noticed that there is usually a marking (dot) on new tires?

Put that marking near the valve stem, and spin the tire
Mark where the weight should go
Break the tire back down, flip it so that the OEM mark is 180 from the valve stem, spin it again
Mark the new spot for the weight
Your "sweet spot" is somewhere between those two markings.
If you break the tire down, turn it so the valve stem is between those two markings, you'll (eventually) find a "zero" balance.

Yes, it's alot of work, but I REALLY don't like weights... so I go to sears to get my tires mounted, and they let me do it... (I used to work there)

I can actually get the info from them, that has pics and shit of what to do, the next time I buy tires... they'll give me the book that explains how to deal with mismatched tires and tires with more than one OEM dot and shit like that...

Yes, it's a lost art... b/c it's a slow process.

US Wheel
08-03-2008, 12:26 PM
looks like a enkei or konig wheel. the center caps usually have a logo at the center. If the logo is similar to a figure 8 then its a enkei. If the logo looks similar to a crown then its a konig. The 690kg is a part# to a wheel

Christ
08-03-2008, 02:38 PM
I believe that 690kg is the structural weight of the wheel... i.e. what it can handle for vehicle weight on that corner. All wheels sold in the US are weight rated, it's a US-DOT requirement.

CapriRacer
08-03-2008, 07:14 PM
Have you ever noticed that there is usually a marking (dot) on new tires?

Put that marking near the valve stem, and spin the tire
Mark where the weight should go
Break the tire back down, flip it so that the OEM mark is 180 from the valve stem, spin it again
Mark the new spot for the weight
Your "sweet spot" is somewhere between those two markings.
If you break the tire down, turn it so the valve stem is between those two markings, you'll (eventually) find a "zero" balance.

Yes, it's alot of work, but I REALLY don't like weights... so I go to sears to get my tires mounted, and they let me do it... (I used to work there)

I can actually get the info from them, that has pics and shit of what to do, the next time I buy tires... they'll give me the book that explains how to deal with mismatched tires and tires with more than one OEM dot and shit like that...

Yes, it's a lost art... b/c it's a slow process.

You are aware that the OEM dot is the high point of the uniformity, right? (think: out of round) It is common that OEM rims are marked with the uniformity low point by drilling the valve hole there. So the idea behind matching these 2 things is to produce the most "round" assembly given that these 2 points are lined up.

BUT

Not all tires are marked with this dot - plus not all the dots on tires are uniformity marks. Not to mention that there are a few OEM rims that aren't marked that way (some aren't even measured!) and pretty much all aftermarket rims aren't measured this way either.

And last but not least: Uniformity is not related to balance. Put another way: You can match mount the tires and get a "zero" uniformity, but it will still require balance weights. Doing it the way you've suggested merely minimizes the amount of balance weight required, but doesn't do anything for the "out of round".

Christ
08-03-2008, 07:45 PM
as opposed to just tossing the tire on there and adding whatever weights the machine calls for...

yes, I'll do what you suggest, cause it's not like I've done this since I was 14 or anything.

I'm well aware of what those dots represent.. I've been to several conferences and "sermons" if you will, talking about the best ways to work with tires and the phenomena associated with vacuum and injection molding.

We all know that no object is truly round, and I also know that if there is an out-of-round condition between your wheel and tire, there is no way to fix it that is realistically available, other than continuously rotating the tire around the rim to try to match it up.

You can add all the weights in the world to your tire/wheel assembly, but the fact is, when you balance a wheel/tire, you're not balancing the wheel at all... you're balancing the tire.

Adding to this: according to federal DOT specs, ALL (yes, ALL) rims must be measured for conformity to standards... this includes "out of round" specs. if it's not within a given specification, it's not road worthy, and can't be sold.

Same thing for tires.

What you're missing is that you're initially using those markings on the tire to balance it. The uniform high spot in the tire is always opposite the place that needs weight in the tire, as it's also the place that weighs the most. (more material/density of material in a given area.)

What you're doing when you zero balance a tire on a wheel assembly is matching the weight differential AND the sizing/uniformity differential between the two.

Resultant fact is that you end up with a tire that's completely balanced, needs no weights, and is as close to "round" as the assembly will allow.

Zero balancing, I might add, is also the most commonly used method in high-speed applications... when's the last time you ever saw wheels weights on a professional race car? (Think: Formula 1, NASCAR, NHRA/IHRA, KART, etc.) They ALL use this method, and it works for them.

Any Sears in this country has the capability to do it, but they don't train their personnel, as it would cost more. Like I said, it's not the easiest, or cost effective method, but it's what I do.

If you wanted to balance the wheel, you'd have to spin it w/o the tire on it, on a machine that would accept that small of a load ( most tire balancing machines won't) such as a pulley balancer, and add/remove weight as necessary.

CapriRacer
08-04-2008, 07:09 AM
There are a number of misconceptions we need to address, so I'm going to break up this posting into segments, so I can address each issue separately:




...........

I'm well aware of what those dots represent.. I've been to several conferences and "sermons" if you will, talking about the best ways to work with tires and the phenomena associated with vacuum and injection molding.

............




Tires are not injection molded, nor vacuum molded. They are molded by applying pressure using a bladder inside the tire and pressing the tire into a mold cavity. The tire is removed by releasing the pressure in the bladder, and the tire is removed from from the bladder assembly. Sometimes the mold itself expands (called segmented molds) and the tire is more easily removed.




.........

We all know that no object is truly round, and I also know that if there is an out-of-round condition between your wheel and tire, there is no way to fix it that is realistically available, other than continuously rotating the tire around the rim to try to match it up.

.............



Which is why they mark both the tire and the rim. If these aren't marked - and many tires and rims aren't - then unless you have a "Road Force" machine like a Hunter GSP9700, you will not be able to do this easily.



..............

You can add all the weights in the world to your tire/wheel assembly, but the fact is, when you balance a wheel/tire, you're not balancing the wheel at all... you're balancing the tire.

........



This may seem like a trivial point, but you can balance the rim by itself, but when you put a tire on the rim, you are balancing them both - as an assembly. You can not balance a tire by itself unless you either measure it by itself or have "Zero" rim - which means both run out and balance are "Zero".



............

Adding to this: according to federal DOT specs, ALL (yes, ALL) rims must be measured for conformity to standards... this includes "out of round" specs. if it's not within a given specification, it's not road worthy, and can't be sold.

...........



Federal Standards are for marking and durability. They do not contain specifications for run out and balance.



..........

Same thing for tires.

...........



The lastest Federal Standard for tires is FMVSS 139. It does contain standards for marking of tires and standards for durability and a couple of other regulations, but there are no Federal Standards for balance or runout.



................

What you're missing is that you're initially using those markings on the tire to balance it. The uniform high spot in the tire is always opposite the place that needs weight in the tire, as it's also the place that weighs the most. (more material/density of material in a given area.)

................



Sorry, uniformity and balance are separate issues. Read what Tire Rack has to say on the subject - and notice they don't mention balance at all!

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=17




............

when's the last time you ever saw wheels weights on a professional race car? (Think: Formula 1, NASCAR, NHRA/IHRA, KART, etc.) They ALL use this method, and it works for them.

.........




Sorry, but look at this photo and see if you don't see convention balance weights:

http://image.motortrend.com/f/features/consumer/9498592/112_0705_08z+goodyear_eagle_f1_all_season+nascar_t ires.jpg



.........

Any Sears in this country has the capability to do it, but they don't train their personnel, as it would cost more.

.............



I'm suggesting that reason Sears doesn't do this is for another reason - the issue is more complex than you give it credit for. The matching of the tire to the wheel gives the best run out, then simply balancing the tire takes care of the weight distribution problem.




..........

Like I said, it's not the easiest, or cost effective method, but it's what I do.

If you wanted to balance the wheel, you'd have to spin it w/o the tire on it, on a machine that would accept that small of a load ( most tire balancing machines won't) such as a pulley balancer, and add/remove weight as necessary.

Sorry, but every balance machine will balance a rim by itself. You are getting confused with the "Road Force" machines, which in addition to performing a convention balance, will also measure the loaded run out of the tire, which is a separate operation.

Here's the web site for the Hunter GSP9700. Click on the "Introduction" tab. They give a pretty good description of the difference between balance and run out.

http://www.gsp9700.com/index.cfm

Hope this helps.

dan89
08-04-2008, 04:19 PM
back on topic, fellas

Christ
08-04-2008, 09:10 PM
werd.. not going to sit and argue with you.. I know what I was trained by Representatives from 7 tire companies over 3 years... I know what I have certification paperwork for... but if you insist on being right, I suppose you can be this time.

dan89
08-04-2008, 09:23 PM
i saw another car with these wheels the other day at hardee's, still no luck searching for brand

Christ
08-05-2008, 02:13 PM
Should have left a note on his car or something.

dan89
08-05-2008, 05:43 PM
i thought about that, but I didn't do it

Christ
08-05-2008, 05:56 PM
Check all the local tire shops that sell wheels... they almost look like something PepBoys might have... Proline alloy.. Check around, you might get lucky and find someone that remembers selling those type of wheels.

CapriRacer
08-05-2008, 06:58 PM
werd.. not going to sit and argue with you.. I know what I was trained by Representatives from 7 tire companies over 3 years... I know what I have certification paperwork for... but if you insist on being right, I suppose you can be this time.

DropZone,

With all due respect to both you and Dan89:

If you would like to debate this further, start another post. That way we can sort out what you have wrong and what you have right. I'm not interested in being right, per se, but I am interested in correcting some of the misconceptions you seem to have.

BTW, I work for a major tire manufacturer and I train the trainers on this and other subjects.

bigrims
11-16-2008, 05:19 AM
Cant help you with who makes the wheels but the references I found below along with some others that might help

JWL Certification - Japan Light Alloy Wheel (JWL) standard is a certification level instituted by the Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport which requires that alloy wheels being purchased in Japan, must have the JWL mark on them thus showing the alloy wheels to have passed through a rigorous self-certification process.

VIA Certification - Vehicle Inspection Association (VIA) is a third-party group in Japan which can test and verify whether or not any alloy wheels can meet up to the JWL certification tests.

Found on link here http://kulchawheels.com/alloy_wheel_information/standard.php

drdisque
12-02-2008, 09:09 PM
It's a very cheap no-name wheel that was commonly sold at places like Pep Boys.

blackm20i
12-05-2008, 10:26 PM
ya im pretty sure i have seen that at pep boys man

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