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Broken Timing Belt, Bent Valves


jwalker1970
11-18-2005, 02:00 PM
I recently acquired a 01 Lanos 1.6 with a broken timing belt & 16 severely bent valves. I was dumbfounded when I spoke to local machine shop & was quoted over $500 just to do the head. So, hopefully my penny pinching experience will help you...
I bought new valves (only available from Daewoo authorized dealer) for $258 shipped to me (Kline in MPLS, MN). I had a headgasked sent from Duluth for $48 (overnighted). I bought a timing belt through a Carquest for $38. I built some tools to help me complete the job... After removing the head, I realized that I had 16 bent valves. Unfortunately my valve spring compresser didn't work on the head, and 2nd, I didn't want to buy intake & exhaust gaskets. So I built one from some common scrap pieces around the shop. (Cost=0) I also built a retainer plate to hold the valves seated when you depress the springs. (I'd be happy to e-mail you pics of the tools..easy to make) I removed the old valves to find cracked guides. I took the chance and didn't replace these. (this turned out to be a good choice....no resulting problems). Next I lapped in the valves using valve grinding compound & a drill with a rubber stopper adapted to the chuck. After cleaning the surfaces & re-installing springs, lifters & cams. Head was ready to install. I cleaned the block surface & saw bad divots in the pistons from the crashed valves. I put some isopropl alchol down each cylinder to see if the divots were through-holes, none were so I dis-regarded the marks on the pistons. NOTE: VALVE TIMING IS ESSENTIAL WHEN INSTALLING HEAD!!! make sure timing marks are correctly lined before installing head onto block. Top 2 sprocketss have a line on the outer edge...they point towards eachother (directly in line with hold down bolts), the crankshaft sprocket has an arrow that points down to the notch in the oil pan lip. I RETORQUED THE HEAD IN THIS PROCEDURE: Starting on the center bolt in back, coming forward then sequencing to the right row back to front, then the left back to front & then right then left in the same matter. TORQUE SPECS: IN 4 STEPS: 18 foot pounds on all bolts, turn all bolts 70 degrees, turn all bolts 70 degrees a second time, then turn all bolts an additional 30 degrees. I re-used my old head bolts, but just wire brushed & oiled them first.
Upon putting back together, the car ran excellent, does not smoke, has good compression. I had only about $300 in parts and about 8 hours in labor (being an experienced mechanic). This job isn't for the do-it your selfer! I was told that the 1.6L DOHC 16 valve engines always wreck valves when the belt brakes, regardless of situation. If you have questions, I would be happy to help you.

Lesson Learned: Change your timing belt before 60,000 miles. my vehicle had just over 61,000 miles when the belt failed.

matt1708
12-01-2005, 03:15 PM
i dont know anything about cars but my cam belt has just gone today. i have a daewoo 98 1.6 16v and it has 60k on it. i had a full service on friday and on the evening the breaks went. i took it back and they said there was no problem with the breaks and that they did not touch the breaks in the full service. now on thursday the timing belt has gone. i had it from 56k miles on it. they said the cam belt should of been changed at 40k and that its not there fault for that or the breaks. i thought it was 60k and 120k for a cam belt change so should they of said it needed a change?. and checked it with the breaks?.

they now say its gona cost me 150 to 1000 pound to fix it.

i have asked them to change the belt because my friend said it was based on the vauxhall vectra that he had. the timing belt went on his and all the valves went in after the cam belt went to stop the pistons hiting them and bending them.

any advice would be great as i have little cash and time.

thanx

MeettheCreeper
12-10-2005, 06:42 PM
I recently acquired a 01 Lanos 1.6 with a broken timing belt & 16 severely bent valves. I was dumbfounded when I spoke to local machine shop & was quoted over $500 just to do the head. So, hopefully my penny pinching experience will help you...
I bought new valves (only available from Daewoo authorized dealer) for $258 shipped to me (Kline in MPLS, MN). I had a headgasked sent from Duluth for $48 (overnighted). I bought a timing belt through a Carquest for $38. I built some tools to help me complete the job... After removing the head, I realized that I had 16 bent valves. Unfortunately my valve spring compresser didn't work on the head, and 2nd, I didn't want to buy intake & exhaust gaskets. So I built one from some common scrap pieces around the shop. (Cost=0) I also built a retainer plate to hold the valves seated when you depress the springs. (I'd be happy to e-mail you pics of the tools..easy to make) I removed the old valves to find cracked guides. I took the chance and didn't replace these. (this turned out to be a good choice....no resulting problems). Next I lapped in the valves using valve grinding compound & a drill with a rubber stopper adapted to the chuck. After cleaning the surfaces & re-installing springs, lifters & cams. Head was ready to install. I cleaned the block surface & saw bad divots in the pistons from the crashed valves. I put some isopropl alchol down each cylinder to see if the divots were through-holes, none were so I dis-regarded the marks on the pistons. NOTE: VALVE TIMING IS ESSENTIAL WHEN INSTALLING HEAD!!! make sure timing marks are correctly lined before installing head onto block. Top 2 sprocketss have a line on the outer edge...they point towards eachother (directly in line with hold down bolts), the crankshaft sprocket has an arrow that points down to the notch in the oil pan lip. I RETORQUED THE HEAD IN THIS PROCEDURE: Starting on the center bolt in back, coming forward then sequencing to the right row back to front, then the left back to front & then right then left in the same matter. TORQUE SPECS: IN 4 STEPS: 18 foot pounds on all bolts, turn all bolts 70 degrees, turn all bolts 70 degrees a second time, then turn all bolts an additional 30 degrees. I re-used my old head bolts, but just wire brushed & oiled them first.
Upon putting back together, the car ran excellent, does not smoke, has good compression. I had only about $300 in parts and about 8 hours in labor (being an experienced mechanic). This job isn't for the do-it your selfer! I was told that the 1.6L DOHC 16 valve engines always wreck valves when the belt brakes, regardless of situation. If you have questions, I would be happy to help you.

Lesson Learned: Change your timing belt before 60,000 miles. my vehicle had just over 61,000 miles when the belt failed.


I love working on these, most are out of warranty so its all gravy.

How do you like that power steering pump pulley?? Could it get any closer to the fender :uhoh:

Prying the engine over to get that out is the worst part of the job.



Matt1708, I would say that if your tbelt broke you have valve damage. Most shops will let you know you need maint. if they are interested in making money but it is mainly your responsiblity to read the owners manual and to know what maint. is required by the manufacturer.

I have seen the Tbelts on these break at 61k miles so I alwas recommend to my customers a Tbelt before 60 K and I keep a bent valve around to show them what happens when the belt breaks.

I know its kind of scare tactic but I have people say after the belt broke that they should have done the belt when I recommended it to them.

scoobytuff
12-25-2005, 03:23 AM
Another good source for parts on these cars is a company called Worldpac. Mainly catering to import car parts, they have a lot of stuff. I have bought Daewoo parts from them for my customers, they are very good quality. The breaking timing belt is very common before 100,000 miles.

rmd140
07-22-2007, 04:13 PM
I recently acquired a 01 Lanos 1.6 with a broken timing belt & 16 severely bent valves. I was dumbfounded when I spoke to local machine shop & was quoted over $500 just to do the head. So, hopefully my penny pinching experience will help you...
I bought new valves (only available from Daewoo authorized dealer) for $258 shipped to me (Kline in MPLS, MN). I had a headgasked sent from Duluth for $48 (overnighted). I bought a timing belt through a Carquest for $38. I built some tools to help me complete the job... After removing the head, I realized that I had 16 bent valves. Unfortunately my valve spring compresser didn't work on the head, and 2nd, I didn't want to buy intake & exhaust gaskets. So I built one from some common scrap pieces around the shop. (Cost=0) I also built a retainer plate to hold the valves seated when you depress the springs. (I'd be happy to e-mail you pics of the tools..easy to make) I removed the old valves to find cracked guides. I took the chance and didn't replace these. (this turned out to be a good choice....no resulting problems). Next I lapped in the valves using valve grinding compound & a drill with a rubber stopper adapted to the chuck. After cleaning the surfaces & re-installing springs, lifters & cams. Head was ready to install. I cleaned the block surface & saw bad divots in the pistons from the crashed valves. I put some isopropl alchol down each cylinder to see if the divots were through-holes, none were so I dis-regarded the marks on the pistons. NOTE: VALVE TIMING IS ESSENTIAL WHEN INSTALLING HEAD!!! make sure timing marks are correctly lined before installing head onto block. Top 2 sprocketss have a line on the outer edge...they point towards eachother (directly in line with hold down bolts), the crankshaft sprocket has an arrow that points down to the notch in the oil pan lip. I RETORQUED THE HEAD IN THIS PROCEDURE: Starting on the center bolt in back, coming forward then sequencing to the right row back to front, then the left back to front & then right then left in the same matter. TORQUE SPECS: IN 4 STEPS: 18 foot pounds on all bolts, turn all bolts 70 degrees, turn all bolts 70 degrees a second time, then turn all bolts an additional 30 degrees. I re-used my old head bolts, but just wire brushed & oiled them first.
Upon putting back together, the car ran excellent, does not smoke, has good compression. I had only about $300 in parts and about 8 hours in labor (being an experienced mechanic). This job isn't for the do-it your selfer! I was told that the 1.6L DOHC 16 valve engines always wreck valves when the belt brakes, regardless of situation. If you have questions, I would be happy to help you.

Lesson Learned: Change your timing belt before 60,000 miles. my vehicle had just over 61,000 miles when the belt failed.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

To jwalker1970: I wanted to thank you for the info that you posted above. It was a tremendous help in repairing my daughters' 2000 Lanos. I followed you instructions to a "T" and just like you said, it fired up first time, runs good, no smoke, and good compression. Again, THNAKS!!!!
Another good source for parts, ' www.newgmpartsusa.com '. I was getting parts in 2-3 days compare to the two week time frame that all nearby dealers quoted and prices were about the same as the dealer prices.
AGAIN, MANY THANKS!!

jwalker1970
11-03-2007, 10:40 AM
I have pics of my homade tools scanned into my pc. I can't figure how to post them here, but if you would like them e-mailed to you, just email me:
Jimmysocrazy@yahoo.com

bandit77ta
11-09-2008, 10:52 PM
I recently acquired a 01 Lanos 1.6 with a broken timing belt & 16 severely bent valves. I was dumbfounded when I spoke to local machine shop & was quoted over $500 just to do the head. So, hopefully my penny pinching experience will help you...
I bought new valves (only available from Daewoo authorized dealer) for $258 shipped to me (Kline in MPLS, MN). I had a headgasked sent from Duluth for $48 (overnighted). I bought a timing belt through a Carquest for $38. I built some tools to help me complete the job... After removing the head, I realized that I had 16 bent valves. Unfortunately my valve spring compresser didn't work on the head, and 2nd, I didn't want to buy intake & exhaust gaskets. So I built one from some common scrap pieces around the shop. (Cost=0) I also built a retainer plate to hold the valves seated when you depress the springs. (I'd be happy to e-mail you pics of the tools..easy to make) I removed the old valves to find cracked guides. I took the chance and didn't replace these. (this turned out to be a good choice....no resulting problems). Next I lapped in the valves using valve grinding compound & a drill with a rubber stopper adapted to the chuck. After cleaning the surfaces & re-installing springs, lifters & cams. Head was ready to install. I cleaned the block surface & saw bad divots in the pistons from the crashed valves. I put some isopropl alchol down each cylinder to see if the divots were through-holes, none were so I dis-regarded the marks on the pistons. NOTE: VALVE TIMING IS ESSENTIAL WHEN INSTALLING HEAD!!! make sure timing marks are correctly lined before installing head onto block. Top 2 sprocketss have a line on the outer edge...they point towards eachother (directly in line with hold down bolts), the crankshaft sprocket has an arrow that points down to the notch in the oil pan lip. I RETORQUED THE HEAD IN THIS PROCEDURE: Starting on the center bolt in back, coming forward then sequencing to the right row back to front, then the left back to front & then right then left in the same matter. TORQUE SPECS: IN 4 STEPS: 18 foot pounds on all bolts, turn all bolts 70 degrees, turn all bolts 70 degrees a second time, then turn all bolts an additional 30 degrees. I re-used my old head bolts, but just wire brushed & oiled them first.
Upon putting back together, the car ran excellent, does not smoke, has good compression. I had only about $300 in parts and about 8 hours in labor (being an experienced mechanic). This job isn't for the do-it your selfer! I was told that the 1.6L DOHC 16 valve engines always wreck valves when the belt brakes, regardless of situation. If you have questions, I would be happy to help you.

Lesson Learned: Change your timing belt before 60,000 miles. my vehicle had just over 61,000 miles when the belt failed.
great info, my son's 2002 lanos just bit the dust with the belt, and after taking the head to get rebuilt ($600) I am finding out now that i am researching where the timing marks s/b that these cars are notorious for this and i should have just crushed the car??? but too late now, the rebuilt head is waiting for me in the shop.. I also found you need a special tool to tighten the belt via the water pump eccentric... did you make one? just curious how you did it. any helpful hints would be appreciated. The timing marks on the camshaft sprockets also don't line up exactly at 3pm and 9pm facing each other, the left cam sprocket is at about 4 oclock??? the right is at 9 oclock like it should be. appreciate any help you could give. Thanks

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