security horn won't stop blowing, here's a tip


whaning
10-21-2005, 02:11 PM
security horn won't stop blowing, here's a tip,

Went to my van today and when I tried to start it the darn horn started blowing,

and I didn't even have my remote with me to shut it off, An English chap, walked by and told me to use the key to open the passenger door, and ghee wihiz,
it worked.

KManiac
10-21-2005, 04:15 PM
The Chrysler products of this era have an optional "Anti-Theft" security system. Vehicles equipped with this system will have a light on the dashboard labeled "Security", which will flash for 15 seconds after you lock the doors, either from the inside power lock switch (when one or more exterior doors are open), or by locking the car with a key from an exterior door lock (once all doors are closed), or by pushing the lock button on the key folb. Not all cars have this, because it was optional. My 1998 T&C does not have this system, but my father's Ram 1500 pick-up truck does. This system works in conjunction with, but independently from, the "Panic" button on your key folb.

You automatically "arm" the "Anti-Theft" system, by pushing the power lock button when exiting the vehicle (with at least one door open), locking the car using the key in an exterior lock (with all doors closed), or by pushing the lock button on your key folb when the doors are closed. Once the light on the dashboard stops flashing, the system is "armed". Once the system is "armed", you cannot unlock the car from the inside, open a car door from the inside, or start the car with a key until the system is "disarmed". There are two ways to disarm this system. One is to press the "unlock" button on the key folb (if the alarm has not triggered). The other is to manually unlock any exterior door lock with the key.

Problems arise if you happen to "arm" the system with the windows open or with someone still sitting in the car. See examples below:

Example 1: Let's say you exit your car while the windows are down and you lock the doors with your key folb or by pushing the power lock button as you exit (a habit easily acquired by most of us). The system will "arm". Now, a few minutes later, you come back to the car and with laziness, reach in through the open window and pull up the lock button. The "Anti-Theft" system will trigger the lights and horn, just like pushing the "Panic" button on the key folb. The only way to "disarm" the system in this case, is to first lock, then unlock the car using the key in an exterior lock. This happened to me when I once rented a Chrysler Sebring convertible back in 1998. I locked the car with the key folb while I had the top down. When I came back to the car, I reached inside and unlocked the doors using the interior power lock button. This set off the alarm. Pushing the buttons on the key folb would not disable the alarm. I sat in the car for five minutes, frantically searching for information in the owners manual until I finally read how to turn the system off. This was very embarassing, but I did learn a valuable lesson.

Example 2: Lets say you and another responsible adult drive to say, the store. The driver gets out of the car and the passenger decides to stay in the car. As the driver exits, one of the two individuals locks the doors, either from the power lock button on the inside while the door is open, or the by the key folb. Then, after fifteen seconds, the occupant of the car decides to drive the car using their own key. As soon as the ignition switch hits the "Start" position, the "Anti-Theft" system will activate the horn and lights and also disable the ignition preventing the car from starting. The starter will crank,but the car will not start. The only way to "disarm" the system in this case, is to first lock, then unlock the car using the key in an exterior lock. I had a good laugh at my father's expense one day. We were going to take his Ram 1500 out on an errand. I got in the passenger side and he drove. Well, before he starts the truck, he gets out of the cab to arrange something in the back and left his door open. I purposely locked the doors using the interior power lock button. When he got back into the truck and shut the door, and the "security" light began to blink. He then began to fiddle with something in the center console, long enough for the "Anti-Theft" system to arm. When he tried to start the truck, the alarm went off. He couldn't figure out what happened and I was sitting next to him just busting a gut laughing. Oh, the evil things we can do when we have the knowledge.

Example 3: Lets take the example above, but this time the person waiting in the car decides to go into the store. As soon as this person opens the door from the inside, the alarm will trigger the horn and lights. Again, you need to first lock, then unlock the car using the key in an exterior door lock to disarm.

To see whether or not you have the "Anti-Theft" system in your car, sit in the driver's seat with the door open, push the power lock button on the door, then shut the door. If a "security" light starts blinking on the dashboard, you have this system. Be sure to open the door again before the light stops blinking (fifteen seconds) or you will set off the alarm. If no lights come on or blink, you don't have the system.

If you encounter what appears to be false "panic" alarms either when you try to start your car, unlock it from the inside, or open a door from the inside when the car is not running, you have the system and have somehow armed it without knowing it. Use your key in any exterior lock to disarm.

Now, if you do have the "Anti-Theft" system, I suggest you try duplicating the scenarios above to activate the system. Then use your key to disarm. It is good practice for those times when you set if off accidentally.

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