Best cornering technique for "S" turns


fredjacksonsan
11-30-2004, 03:49 PM
After reading some articles, it seems the best technique for moving through "S" turns is to make the actual turns as straight as possible, marking the apex and doing a smooth but quick turn in fairly late (but not too late) in the turn. Both early and late apex will cost time and speed in comparison to the best line.

But when would the transition from the first turn to the second be made? At the point that you normally would turn in from the straight, or is there a dynamic I'm not aware of that would change your transition point?

tanly03
12-05-2004, 08:08 AM
After reading some articles, it seems the best technique for moving through "S" turns is to make the actual turns as straight as possible, marking the apex and doing a smooth but quick turn in fairly late (but not too late) in the turn. Both early and late apex will cost time and speed in comparison to the best line.

But when would the transition from the first turn to the second be made? At the point that you normally would turn in from the straight, or is there a dynamic I'm not aware of that would change your transition point?


Thats a good question. I tried to drift with my beemer and cliped my taillights because i turned in too late. It seems like you got to start turning a little bit before you leave the first turn. I have watched countless videos and the ones that do the cleanest drifts look like they turn in before they finish the drift. They dont turn too much or too fast because it can bring the tail around and fuck all kinds of things up. i am no expert i just notice this fact while i was watching some of my drift videos.

watch this badass video of a supra by copying and printing this site (you need quick time player)

http://www.urbanvideos.net/otherclips/cars/FastSupra.mpeg

FireFox05
12-05-2004, 01:33 PM
It'll be different for front, rear, or all-wheel drive cars as well.

simdel1
12-12-2004, 05:02 PM
i think this is a racing question as opposed to a drifting question.

this is a difficult question to answer as i have never tried to think about it too much as 's' corners can be so varied, the perfect line varies also. my first suggestion would be to just try several laps with slightly different lines, find which works best (by lap time or by whatever feels best to you). if you really must think, then i can suggest a starting point. after the first corner, make sure you car is positioned in the middle of the track, and turn in for the second corner approximately half way between the apex's of the two corners. if i've not explained my self very well, i will do a diagram.

fredjacksonsan
12-13-2004, 09:29 PM
Cool; I guess practice makes perfect.

CBFryman
12-29-2004, 01:42 PM
Well Lines very to exacty where you want to be on the road but, usually you want to start out on the outside of the first turn and over steer to where the apex is ver close to the inside of the turn this will set you up to for the inside edge of the 2nd turn and as you exit the 1st turn may the turn smooth and straight as possible. wish i could draw a diagram...

462cid
06-04-2005, 10:09 PM
You leave the first turn in the manner which allows you the quickest path to full power in the last turn, because when you can put all the power down is what it's about.

The 'classical' way was to take a late apex into the first turn, while trail braking. This sets you up for the switchback. The suspension unloading can help bring the car into the opposite turn.

Essentially, take a late apex, brush the brakes while still under power, to transfer weight forward and 'nose in' the car. The body roll and more power brings you to the entry to the second turn, which can now be taken closer to 'straight' than the first one. A large radius turn would be taken as two turns instead of one.

FWD and AWD aren't really gonna pull that off, though. But that was a standard F1 technique for many years, and probably still a principle they follow in theory

GSRtrackside
06-25-2005, 03:03 AM
From my canyon experiences, I start the turn on the far right of the road and turn in to hit the apex ''smooth'' once you hit it, Get ready for the second apex while keeping the same line that you came out of and just ''smoothly '' turn the wheel towards the second apex. do this while keeping speed, grip, and steady braking(if required) but maintain max speed without losing grip of course. "smooth" is the key to the 'fastest lap times'

S13 drifter
06-20-2006, 06:51 PM
Well...
This question can actually be answered in a couple of ways. It depends on your driving style if you're style is drifting though i got the cure for the itch, say the s' are left to right you come in straight but set up for a early apex on the right by staying on the outside of the left then brake as you feint the car left then sharp right, as you bring your nose across the apex you'll still be going too fast so as ur nose comes across the apex break accordingly.

Complicated i know, just dont wreck your car.

P.S.-This technique takes a bit of practice very, professional move here, so if ur not that good stick to the e-break.

Porsche-nine11
01-15-2007, 12:13 AM
well, in theory if there is a straight ahead, then you would want to take a late apex, and then an early apex to get back on the power as early and get the car going as soon as possible. if there isnt a straight ahead then i wouldnt know what to do, other than try to take the straightest line possible

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