Tire air pressure recommendation


96rodeo
11-13-2004, 09:04 PM
I've got a set of P265/70R16 Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revos with about 7000 miles on them. Currently I've got 34 psi in them. I was wondering how much air pressure other people with the same size tire are running? By the way, these tires are awesome!!!

Nick

Cat Fuzz
11-13-2004, 09:35 PM
Whatever it says on the side of the tire is what you should put in there.

96rodeo
11-13-2004, 10:01 PM
The side of the tire only lists the max air pressure which is 44 psi. The door jam sticker is intended for smaller size tires.

anthonyn
11-13-2004, 10:55 PM
I've got a set of P265/70R16 Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revos with about 7000 miles on them. Currently I've got 34 psi in them. I was wondering how much air pressure other people with the same size tire are running? By the way, these tires are awesome!!!

Nick

I have 35 PSI (cold) in mine. Gives good balance of nimble handling and good gas mileage.

rodeo02
11-13-2004, 11:13 PM
Whatever it says on the side of the tire is what you should put in there.

Thats a no no. You should always run what the vehicle door sill label specs (for stock sized tires). It's specific per the vehicle for safety, economy, comfort and tire life. The tire sidewall specs the max press that specific tire should ever run at. FWIW, my 2002 specs 26psig all the way around. I've found 28psig to be the best for handling & MPG's If you are running your stock sized tires more than 5psig over the label specs, not only are you a roll-over hazard, but you will cup the crap out of your tires.
G/luck
Joel

Ramblin Fever
11-15-2004, 10:37 AM
My door calls for 29 front/32 rear for stock tires. I haven't ran stock tires for 5 years; instead I've ran LT245/75 16's rather than the P225/75 16's.

When I had the P225/75's, the recommened PSI was what I ran with the exception of 32 on all 4's rather then just the rear.

My 1st set of the LT245's begin to wear horribly with only 32psi. The outside edges on all 4's begin to wear, truck cornered terribly, almost as if the tread wanted to come off the rim. And it would wobble upon turning corners, and sloppy on quick manuevers.

Aired up to 35psi, got a little better, however still acted sloppy.

I currently also run Dueler Revo's in the LT245/75 16's, since I tend to do a lot of highway driving, and boat hauling I run them at 40psi all the way around.

I'm consistently checking for any signs of under/over inflation, and have absolutely no problems for nearly 10K miles now - no cupping, no irregular wear. And the truck is steady on manuevers, cornering, etc.

If I didn't do a lot of highway driving, I'd probably run 38psi - however, I've heard many many times that if you do a lot of highway driving that you really should put in another 2-5psi.

This is what I run and have had the best handling with, it may sound like a bit too much I'm sure. But trust me, I had spent days, if not a few weeks playing with different pressures on these tires to find the best area.

Anything under 38psi, and the Revo's give a horrible rolling off rim effect when cornering.

Please note though, I have the '97 model year, which may be a little heavier then the 98+ years.

96rodeo
11-15-2004, 04:34 PM
Thanks for the replies everybody!!!

Just curious, has anybody ever tried nitrogen in replace of air in the tires? Unlike air, nitrogen's not supposed to change with temperature. Note: air changes 1 psi for every 10 degree change in temperature.

Nick

rodeo02
11-15-2004, 04:53 PM
Thanks for the replies everybody!!!

Just curious, has anybody ever tried nitrogen in replace of air in the tires? Unlike air, nitrogen's not supposed to change with temperature. Note: air changes 1 psi for every 10 degree change in temperature.

Nick
Sure have. Argon too. Didn't notice a thing. Both are nice inert & stable gases, & argon molecules are BIG and less prone to leakage, but IMHO, total overkill for a passenger vehicle tire.
G/luck
Joel

wb4lbg
11-19-2004, 01:43 PM
Since air is already 79% nitrogen, there should be no appreciable difference in the way that the pressure of air changes with temperature vs the way nitrogen pressure changes with temperature. In fact, at any given temperature and volume, the pressure of air would only be 3.6% higher than that of nitrogen at the same temperature and volume. For a typical inflation pressure of 29-35 psig, this would amount to about 1 psig -- hardly worthy of notice.

I've got a mostly worn out set of Cooper Discoverers on my 99 and I run about 31-32 psig in them. It seems a little more prone to slipping on wet pavement. I don't know that running the recommended 26 psig in them would make it handle any better in the rain but the higher pressure definitely helps on the highway mileage.

JWS

1999 Rodeo LSE 4x4

96rodeo
11-19-2004, 03:54 PM
That's interesting information about nitrogen and argon. I didn't think nitrogen would make a noticable difference in an average vehicle tire; just curious. Thanks for confirming this!

Nick

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