HELP HELP water in my headlights


e1gato07
11-06-2004, 02:12 AM
I need help I live in Oregon and I am getting water in my headlights I need ideas how to repair they are not broken some how I am getting water inside pleace help!!!!

GTR2b
11-06-2004, 07:56 AM
Somewhere in your headlight assembly you have a crack or the seal is leaking. It's only a matter of time before the bulb burns out now.

What you need to do is remove the bulb and drain out the light. Then be sure to dry out the ENTIRE inside of the headlight. Hairdryers work fine but a heat gun is better. Then, take silicone and lay beads of it down all of the seams of the light. Be sure to let the silicone dry fully before reinstalling it in the car.

If this does not work. You will be better off going to a junk yard and getting another light. Personally, I don't even bother trying to fix them any more, unless the leak is easily discovered.

prid3_pain
11-07-2004, 01:11 PM
also use a lot of the silcone.. dont be scared to use to... had the same problem on my projectors.. so all I did was drill a hole in the bottom of the lights..

04CivicLover
11-08-2004, 06:59 PM
If you dont feel like going through all that trouble. I think it will be much easier to just go to a junk yard and pick up a head light

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
11-19-2004, 01:06 AM
duct tape around the top of the light assembly, and where the bulb plugs in from the back if your super lazy.

d16civic
11-19-2004, 04:55 PM
duct tape around the top of the light assembly, and where the bulb plugs in from the back if your super lazy.


Oh the amazing duct tape,tell me you are kidding,please!!
try silicone sealer,but yor best bet is to get a replacement head light.

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
11-19-2004, 09:43 PM
Straight up! Duct tape is the best. But no, seriously my car is covered in it. Just kidding, but seriously I have duct tape fins on the back, haha just kidding. But seriously their electrical tape....

e1gato07
12-01-2004, 02:18 AM
thanks for the advice. I tried the silicone already and it didn't work. I will try to put more silicone to see if it'll work, if not I will try to return it for a different one.

JakeDrummer
12-01-2004, 11:01 AM
thanks for the advice. I tried the silicone already and it didn't work. I will try to put more silicone to see if it'll work, if not I will try to return it for a different one.


alot of times if you go through high presured automadic car washes. just my two cents

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
12-02-2004, 07:15 PM
alot of times if you go through high presured automadic car washes. just my two cents

Next time try putting in 3 or even 4 cents, maybe then youll have a complete idea written down.

thanks for the advice. I tried the silicone already and it didn't work. I will try to put more silicone to see if it'll work, if not I will try to return it for a different one.

Did you use silicone spray, or grese? Did you clean the seal first? Did you cover your head light in duct tape? How bout your car? Have you made fins out of tape yet?

sportinawoody
12-03-2004, 10:16 PM
scrap all these ideas. the easiest, cheapest and MOST EFFECTIVE WAY to fix this is remove your lights and drill to little bity holes , one on each end of the light. this will vent any moisture and solve your problem PERMANENTLY. ive done this for people maybe 2 or 3 hundred times and on all my vehicles. trust me, this is the most effective way and you will never have foggy lights again

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
12-07-2004, 03:38 AM
scrap all these ideas. the easiest, cheapest and MOST EFFECTIVE WAY to fix this is remove your lights and drill to little bity holes , one on each end of the light. this will vent any moisture and solve your problem PERMANENTLY. ive done this for people maybe 2 or 3 hundred times and on all my vehicles. trust me, this is the most effective way and you will never have foggy lights again

Plus, the added benifit is that without sealing out the outside air/moisture all that stuff will get on the bulb and help it to burn out faster. Nothings better than getting to change light bulbs every 6 months. Don't believe me? Try touching the glass on your bulb before you install it THEN install it and see how long it lasts.

sportinawoody
12-07-2004, 11:49 AM
let me ask you something... if you crack both windows in the rain with foggy windows, does the windows hold fog smarty ??? no because the moisture in the car is ventilated. same concept. with proper ventilation nothing will hold moisture.like i said, i have this done to ALL m vehicles on 1 light or another and havent lost a bulb in yearssssssssssss. i appreciate your idea but thats all it is. i know from trial and error that this is absolutely, positively the only cheap, quick 1 time fix that will solve this problem. duct tape and sealer are good when you know where the leak is but this way you dont have to find it. evidence dont lie

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
12-10-2004, 10:24 AM
let me ask you something... if you crack both windows in the rain with foggy windows, does the windows hold fog smarty ??? no because the moisture in the car is ventilated. same concept. with proper ventilation nothing will hold moisture.like i said, i have this done to ALL m vehicles on 1 light or another and havent lost a bulb in yearssssssssssss. i appreciate your idea but thats all it is. i know from trial and error that this is absolutely, positively the only cheap, quick 1 time fix that will solve this problem. duct tape and sealer are good when you know where the leak is but this way you dont have to find it. evidence dont lie

1.) I don't know where you live but here in Seattle Im pretty sure most people drive with the windows closed when its raining.
2.) How exactly does the air in YOUR car end up with a higher humidity/moisture content than the air outside during rain?
3.) Duct tape; I was being a smartmouth and wouldn't actually expect anyone to try.
4.) "with proper ventilation nothing will hold moisture" Thats stupid (note that I did not say YOUR stupid, so don't take this as a personal attack), what if you compleatly submerge your car in the ocean, if you start ventillating into the water what do you think will happen? Or even more realistic what if you drive a convertible with its top down, that would be ventillation to the extreme, yet in the rain Im pretty sure your convertible would hold moisture.
5.) If headlights were meant to have holes in them, don't you think they would come that way?
6.) Considering ALL the different types, shapes, and kinds of cars out there, wouldn't it be prudent to assume that what worked/works for your car(s) may not work for his, and might end up causing more damage (on new cars that = $$$).
7.) "evidence dont lie" technically the only real evidence you have is that your car's lights, in your weather seem to work. Would you be willing to pay to replace/repair his lights, should your suggestion not work?

gismo0184
12-12-2004, 05:48 PM
so much hostility, i thought we were here to help eachother. smart mouthing isn't going to solve any problems neither will arguing. i agree with sportinawoody on this though. ventilation is necessary. in the rain if you slightly roll the window down you are letting denser air into your car allowing it to circulate the humid air inside from body heat and breathing. drilling small holes (2) works, even in the rain and the bulbs will not blow out. however, i think e1gato07 should choose the best method for his mechanical abilities and budget.

sportinawoody
12-12-2004, 06:58 PM
here here... i agree , he can choose. not gonna try an convince any nonbelievers just my 2 cents

sportinawoody
12-12-2004, 07:23 PM
1.) I don't know where you live but here in Seattle Im pretty sure most people drive with the windows closed when its raining.
2.) How exactly does the air in YOUR car end up with a higher humidity/moisture content than the air outside during rain?
3.) Duct tape; I was being a smartmouth and wouldn't actually expect anyone to try.
4.) "with proper ventilation nothing will hold moisture" Thats stupid (note that I did not say YOUR stupid, so don't take this as a personal attack), what if you compleatly submerge your car in the ocean, if you start ventillating into the water what do you think will happen? Or even more realistic what if you drive a convertible with its top down, that would be ventillation to the extreme, yet in the rain Im pretty sure your convertible would hold moisture.
5.) If headlights were meant to have holes in them, don't you think they would come that way?
6.) Considering ALL the different types, shapes, and kinds of cars out there, wouldn't it be prudent to assume that what worked/works for your car(s) may not work for his, and might end up causing more damage (on new cars that = $$$).
7.) "evidence dont lie" technically the only real evidence you have is that your car's lights, in your weather seem to work. Would you be willing to pay to replace/repair his lights, should your suggestion not work?


1st : florida where we get more rain and harder more freak storms.
2nd :your body heat and inside veh. temp combined moisture in a sealed enviroment causes condensation/ = FOG = airborne moisture. also there is no heat in rain therefore there is no humidity in rain storms UNLESS the sun is out bright and hot. there is no such thing as humidity without HEAT!!! get it ;;;; heat in your car;;; heat in your headlights ::: drill a hole or crack a window and ( poof ) fog be gone. never intended to break it down to a science but not gonna be shot down by beligerence.
3rd : let me replace the word moisture with a more accurate humidity.
4th : dont know, dont care. i know it works and so do millions of others.
5th : ive worked for honda, chrysler, ford, and mitsubishi. now i run my own show and i do this from time to time for customers to save them money and guess what,,,, not 1 complaint. a few have came back and applauded me after they drove and parked in the rain a few times. guess what no blown bulbs. a 1/4" or smaller drill bit isnt going to let water in probably because the bends it takes to get to the hole and then the bends to touch the light are to great for the size hole im refering to, but is enough to vent the humidity created from moisture inside combined with heat.
last : should he drill the holes strategically,,, absolutely. iwill guarantee his lights and bulbs. these arent just my cars either. off top of my head ive done it to just about every kind of honda and many chrysler p/t cruisers, ram trucks, etc. talons and eclipses galants, and 1 evo thats in turbo tune that belongs to a buddy of mine that had that problem already. its about brand new for christ sake. anymore questions? :smokin:

PeanutM&MsRgood4u
12-27-2004, 08:10 PM
anymore questions? :smokin:
You know what, I just don't care anymore. Regardless of what you think works and why, drilling holes in your lights voids their warrenty, period. And if somehow, something were to go wrong and he were to get hurt by doing something like this, then both the light assembly manufacturer and the car manufacturer are gonna say, "hey you took responsiblity for the consequences once you decided to break out the drill bit, tough luck" Sure maybe its a whole lot cheaper but that extra money your spending is buying more than a light assembly, its buying you the assurance that if something goes wrong you aren't the one held accountable.

Ana Little
12-27-2004, 08:36 PM
I have water in my headlights too...I was thinking of buying some goldfish and starting a trend.

e1gato07
01-11-2005, 02:32 AM
Thanks..... I place my headligths in the oven at 350
for 15 min let it cool down and add more silcone and that did it thanks all

verndawg115
02-12-2005, 04:19 PM
..take your headlight apart and let it dry or put it in a warm area to get all the moisture out then reseal the headlights all around..theres probably a crack somewhere

YoBoyThacker
02-13-2005, 04:43 PM
I have water in my headlights too...I was thinking of buying some goldfish and starting a trend.

Good idea.......

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