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Toyota CD Player Problem


jvanemmerik
01-03-2004, 09:54 PM
I am having a problem with the Toyota L4210 CD player that my husband installed about 2 years ago. It has never been reliable when playing home-burned CDs. It will play them very occasionally, and even then it hangs on a lot of the tracks. By hang, I mean the player makes a slight rasping sound, but it's unable to engage the CD on that track and shows no track counter numbers (that always start at 000). Sometimes, I advance to another track and I can get it to play, but usually, I just have to switch to another CD (the cartridge holds 3 CDs, by the way) - experience tells me that once a particular track hangs, I am unlikely to get anything on that CD to play at all. I thought it was just my homemade CDs, but the player has started to hang on the store-bought ones now too. Sometimes it will play 'em and sometimes it won't. Can anyone help??? This one drives me nuts!
Thanks for any suggestions. -jvanemmerik

Sportivo Concepts
01-03-2004, 11:33 PM
have you tried cleaning the iris of the reader? it can get dirty easily and will not read properly.

jvanemmerik
01-04-2004, 08:41 PM
have you tried cleaning the iris of the reader? it can get dirty easily and will not read properly.
I will give this a try - thank you for the suggestion. - jve

yotatechie04
01-06-2004, 02:58 AM
have you tried cleaning the iris of the reader? it can get dirty easily and will not read properly.

I agree, you can clean the lens of the cd player with ease, just remove the cover over the cd player and you should be able to look straight down to the lens, all you need to clean it is some rubbing alcohol and a q-tip. Also to prevent the lens from becoming dirty so soon, you can use a can of compressed air and blow the dust out of all the components in the system, this helps.

Hajoca
03-17-2004, 08:55 PM
One thing I noticed with the older CD players (ones that do not say specifically CD-R and CD-RW compatable) is that changing brands of CDRs help.

Look for the most opaque CD disks you can find. So hold the disk up to a light and see if it shows through. CDRs that are painted with a label are good also.

If all that fails as well, CDRs made for Audio CD copies are better too and are about $3 CDN, but work very well in old players, like my 1989 Kenwood unit in my cavalier... to think my dad paid $600 for it... priceless!!


Lastly try Burning the CDs on a slower setting for a better quality 'pits' or 'bumps' in the CD. That is what the player looks for.

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