Advice to new riders.


Xv7vX
12-03-2003, 02:37 PM
If i may give out some advice to new riders.
It doesnt take a rocekt scientist to figure out bikes are totally different than cars. Here is some advice to new riders.

1) Always were protective gear. Do not purchase a bike before buying a helmet and jacket. There is no conceivable reason to ever not wear gear.

2) Do not, under any circumstance ride with any of the following: Sandals, shorts, or no shirt or t-shirt.

3) Always listen to advice from those more experienced than you.

4) There is no substute for seat time. You will always learn something new the longer you ride.

5) Take any classes offered by the state. They maybe lame, no doubt. But seat time is key. Also, most of these classes will offer you your liscense if you complete the course. This also correspondes with #4 and #3.

6) Always inspect you bike on a weekly if not daily basis.
This includes but is not limited to lube the chain, check the tires, brakes, oil, ect.

7) Warm both your engine and tires everytime.

8) When ever possible ride with others, not only for the experience and knowledge but also groups are more easily seen by others.

9) Never assume the driver sees you, will turn a certin way, ect. In fact never assume anything. ALWAYS be on the alert for others.

10) Respect your machine.
Remember that 999,999 time out of 1,000,000 the bike is better than the rider. Very seldom and i mean VERY seldom does the rider out perform the bike. Remember to ALWAYS respect your machine and to KNOW your own limitations. This doesnt mean you shouldn't push your self to be a better rider, but always KNOW your self and dont lie about your own abilities to your self. Lie to your girlfriend, your friends, or lie to the police, but not your self.

!!) Know your self and your limitations.

12) THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE! listen very closely.

YOU WILL FALL. YOU WILL GO DOWN. I dont care how long you have ridden. How good you are or THINK you are. EVERY SINGLE rider goes down. It may be your fault, or it may not. Some may drop in a corner pick them selfs up and drive home. Some of us go down for good. If you deny this or can not acept this or for whatever reason dont agree with this, do your self and us and everyone else a favor and dont ride. In fact dont even go into a bike shop. This is the reality of riding motorcycles. Every time you go out you must acept that you may not come back, ever. If you still continue to ride as many of us have, then good for you, but always remember this fact.


Anything i forgot, or anything i missed feel free to contribute all!!


Please for the love of God stay safe. Everytime you think of doing someting stupid think of your family and friends standing next to your casket, closed of corse.

speediva
12-03-2003, 07:42 PM
VERY well said, my friend. More true than perhaps we like to think.

Ace$nyper
12-04-2003, 12:55 AM
Ok I gotta say i'm not diagreeing with what your saying but my dad has been riding 20+yrs on and off never once laid a bike down i've been riding 1 1/2 neither have I. i understand that it can happen but to say it WILL is kinda well blunt and untrue i think. I must say Take the class is the best idea. Ok this one you will hate me for but for hemelts yea there good. but if its legal not too and you don't want to don't then i'm a firefighter seen lots of dead bikers helmets do jack shit when you wipe out bad your heads fine just well 15ft from your body. So don't let them make you feel invuleable. I've also seen them save lives so do remember that the can and do. Once i'm 21 my helmets for sale any takers?

YellowMaranello
12-04-2003, 09:30 AM
Sure, there are a few people who may never have laid down a bike, but they are few and far between. It's just like saying that everyone who drives a car with a manual tranny has stalled it at one point. Once again, there may be a few people who never have, but for the most part EVERYONE does it at one point or another.

Ace$nyper
12-04-2003, 12:00 PM
yea and a big part I think is also luck had lot of close calls. But I think just saying you will lay down will scare alot of new riders off and thats just no fun you know cause were trying to help others into our hobby not chase them off with fear.

Xv7vX
12-04-2003, 03:04 PM
If your dad has been riding that long has not laid it down thats great. I'm not being sarcastic, thats great. You too. I pray you both never go down. I have never laid down either. But i have been hit on a clam day by a driver that was not paying attention, and it nearly killed me. If a cars has a fenderbender that ruins your day. If a motorcycle has a fenderbenders it destroys your life.

I have to say im a little suprised to see a firefighter say not to wear helmets, and while I agree that they are not guarantee that you will live through an accident, they are most certinly a guarantee of rasing your chances of surviving, compared to no head protection at all. As im sure you allready know that brain can have severe damage and be destroyed at an impact as little as 1/2 mile per hour. I do agree in personal freedom and individual choices, and if you are THAT against helmets that you chose not to wear them, that that is your personal choice. Live and let live. But i would encourage all motorcyclist to wear all available protection at all times. We loose to many brothers the way it is.
As for scaring new riders, well if it scares them then fine. I believe it to be the truth, and i think everyone should consider it. Everytime you go out you might not come back. I think i large part of RESPONSIBLE riding is being able to acknowlege this. I dont think that new riders should twist the throttle with out thinking about ALL the POSSBILE risks associated with the sport we all love so much. Further i believe that if a new rider knows this, acknowleges this and still choses to ride he or she will be a better rider for it.

At anyrate, i hope we all stay safe, and wish the best for all motorcyclist.

As a last note, any new riders, or anyone for that matter should feel free to PM me with any questions, no matter how insignificant. I would like to be able to help anyone and everyone ride safer and better. (though i am by no means a professor of motorcyles, but i have plenty of experience.)

R1-rider
12-04-2003, 04:55 PM
A kid I know Brian O'Leary just died yesterday from a crash on his gixxer 1K, and he did have a helmet on, however if he wasn't a 18 year old kid who just started riding on a 1liter sportsbike, perhaps it would have been an avoidable accident.

Ride safe.

Ace$nyper
12-04-2003, 10:03 PM
oh yea I 100% agree they do save lives. Maybe its just some hidden rebel in me that tells me to leave mine at home. But I will say not untill you feel your a compent rider even think of riding without a helm. I've seen people wreck bikes first weekend ride and not having a helm caused there injury to be lot worse. So if you plan on no helm wait till you can ride well.
I'm sorry to hear about that R-1. Thats another thing probbly don't start on somthing like a 1liter sport bike.

2strokebloke
12-04-2003, 11:26 PM
Know and use hand signals, don't zip through traffic between cars and cut people off, unless you want to be run over by a soccer mom driving a ford excursion. And wear some good boots for winter riding, you'll need them.

Ace$nyper
12-05-2003, 12:22 AM
fo sheezy i vote this be sticky!

speediva
12-08-2003, 01:17 PM
Helmet = open casket
No Helmet = closed casket
Got Lidz???

EGcivicSi
12-11-2003, 12:19 AM
Yes that is why that other kid on here who bought the R1 as his first bike may not be with us too much longer. Hate to say it but its nothing but PROVEN true. Poor guy.

parrish5o
12-27-2003, 04:17 PM
I won't get on mine without my helmet. Hell if for no other reason just to keep the bugs out of my eyes. Any protection is better than none so I have no problem wearing mine.

Elrod on the V-Rod
12-28-2003, 08:31 PM
I say that all that has been said for the beginner should hold true for the expierenced.I have ridden for a long time.Since the early 70's.I've never been hurt real bad but I've been there.I love to ride!Never get stoned or drunk and attempt to ride.There is less than a 50% of surviving this way on a bike.I find it more comfortable to ride with a helmet(bugs and all) To those people that have'nt crashed.Don't foget about the second biggest little word.YET! The first one is IF.Ride it and respect it.


Elrod on the V-Rod

carguyinok
12-28-2003, 09:36 PM
Xv7vX , that write up should get a sticky. The only things I would say is missing. Leathers !!!!! Your 2nd skin. I went down HARD on a CBR 600 F2.
Late one night I was out for a ride. I lived on a back highway speeds around 65 just out my driveway. Anyway, I leave my place and just nail it. Then I see tail lights about 1\4 mile in front of me. No big deal I am still on it around 85 90 mph. Then I see the tail lights cut hard right then left into the ditch. Now I am almost on top of the car when it did this. Next thing I know theres a BODY of a person on the road :eek7: Now it was time to think fast #1 hit the body dead on. #2 lay the bike down not to hit him. I went with #2 Sent the bike off into the ditch with me sliding down the road. The bike slid down the road into the ditch and took out a mile marker post. I went about the same but missed the post. Thank god for my leathers & lid!!! I was ok and got up with out a scratch. Turns out the car had hit this guy as he was crossing the highway. I ran up and saw he was alive. But bolth his legs where broken BAD and he was out. I ran back to my bike and pushed it up in front of him and started flashing my head light back down the road at on coming cars. At the same time I am calling 911 on my cell. We bolth almost got taken out by a big rig that some how didnt see us till the lats minn. I am talking me dropping my bike AGAIN & taking a dive off the road. Then seeing the trailer tires locked up and smoking past his head :eek: Just after all that the cops show and close the highway.
Point is leathers & a lid WILL save your azz. There a 2nd skin that will let you hit the road and make it. So long as you dont get hit or hit some thing :banghead: You never know.
One other thing for newbe riders. Watch out for oil in parking spaces. Your foot can slip out from under you real fast. Plus on blacktop your stand can and will sink into it on hot days. Then your bike falls over when your not even there. :banghead:
I took hold of the bars in 1986 & have yet to let um go. That was my first and only time down. SO FAR :biggrin:

Xv7vX
01-06-2004, 11:50 AM
TOTALLY, i forgot about OIL!!!!!

OIL EVERYONE, that black strip down the center of the lane is oil!
Your tire, your foot ect can easily slip on that, becareful of oil in parking lots as well and ESPECIALLY at toll booths if you have them in your area. I cant tell you how many times ive sliped on oil at toll booths.

And leather it great as well, i know it may not fit all climates, and i know how hot it gets in the summer, but many companies make mesh jackets with leather protection on the most vital areas of your body.

carguyinok: Thats one story man, for real! I read it twice. Glad to hear you can exhibit that much control over your wheels. I wish everyone was that good, we would all be a little safer.

And i agree it would be nice to see this or a version like it to be posted as sticky.

da_monsta
01-20-2004, 02:47 AM
may be it is just my personal experience, but i know about my bike and my skill (limit) as if i've been riding for 2 years on the street just by spending a day in a track. It is a very safe controled environment. no traffic nor some idiots changing lane without looking at the mirrors. if you are in So. Cal area, Fast Track Riders has a very good program. for just around $170 you get to ride your bike at the AMA track setup Calif. Seedway. badd asss track! go check your local dealer. Willowsprings has also nice programs. but the track is a fast one. so if you are a new bee, i wouldn't go to this track yet. - Ride Safe -

girlie97gt
01-24-2004, 08:45 PM
I am a new rider of just 2 yrs in.. I do agree with everyone has said.. Except for the riding without a helmet. Also i would like to add to the issue with helmets.. there are many different kinds of helmets made. I personally use full face, Kinda look at this way I take a look at the scull helmets and see what they don't cover then pick up my full face helmet and see what it does cove.. And i'am thankful everytime i get off my bike safe without a scratch. I have dropped my bike but never been down.. and i thank god for that. cause it hurts just dropping it down.. (he he he) but a word of advise to all who do plan on getting there first bike... Start out small and learn the sport. I current have a 2002 kawasaki ninja 500r let me just tell you that has enough power to keep up with all the r1's and ninja 1200's out there.. I know from experince of riding with the "boys". This year i think it is time to trade my girl in.. it is time for someone else to learn the sport on her. Get experince with the small ones first then gradually go up with the power.. Let's just put it this way my boyfriend wants to learn how to ride.. He has big dreams of getting a big bike.. Little does he know that he is starting out on my ninja 500r. The last thing i have to say.. Never Loose respect for the machine in which rides between your legs.. cause once you loose respect for the great beast, is the day you loose respect for life itself

Xv7vX
01-25-2004, 12:28 PM
Well said girlie97gt.

Lionsbane
02-04-2004, 08:43 PM
Hey I'm 18 and am going to college next year and I am thinkin about getting a bike. I have been lookin at the Kawasaki ninjas and I am pretty sure that is the Bike I want. I was wondering if I should start with a 250 or is a 500 ok to start with. I am a newb when it comes to motorcycles. I have a little KX80 but that is all the experience I have. All of these posts are really great and I thank you all for your advice. I guess what I was wondering is, what qualifies as a good starting bike? How do I know if I'm getting a good deal or not? I would greatly appreciate any advice. Thanks.

89IROC&RS
02-18-2004, 10:23 PM
ok not to be a guy or anything, but do i even need to make a joke about the last two sentences in girli97qt's post??????

but seriously. im a car guy, new to cycles, i repect the views of older, and more experienced riders. however i think that to approach the sport from the point of view that its all buisness and no fun, its not right. also coming from a harly family background, the view on helmets is slightly different. on a sport bike, at speed, in traffic, yes, i totally and completey support the use of full coverage helmets. however they are not always needed, and can in fact, cause fatal injuries, do to skull bounce. laying down a bike, or worse, falling backwards off one, if you hit on the flesh, you get road rash, hit with a helmet, and it can bounce back hard enough to break your neck. i have known three people this has happend to. i do not mean to counter anyone on here, seeing as i do not even own a motorcycle at this point, however i thought it was a point someone should bring up. remember guys, as serious a deal as this sport can be, i think its safe to say that eveyone does it becaue its fun, and you enjoy it. try also to pass that part along to those prepairing to join ya on the road.

spinktec
03-06-2004, 08:44 PM
16 years exp.. probably 200,000 bike miles on me.
First street bike: (650 Maxium) Went down at 70mph on Pacific coast highway.. slid across the road then over the cliff. Lucky I landed on a ledge about 25 feet down. Another time hit a patch of black ice and slid into a ditch on a turn. Yet another, fell on my side taking off from a toll booth in the middle of summer (puddles of oil).
Second street bike: (Seca 900) Decide to "see how fast it would go" 140mph on the speedo. As soon as I let off the gas the bike went into speed wobbles. Didn't go down but had to pull the seat out of my rectum when I stopped.
Third bike: (GS1150E) Went down in a parking lot pulling into a parking place. I had too, there was a pickup cutting through the parking space, and I was in a FULL lean. I learned a little something there.
Fourth bike: (FJ1200) Rode it 2 hours to work every day for a year but on this day... Stupid lady in front freaked out when she saw blue lights and locked her brakes. I hit her at 60mph, luckily I went over her car because the Blazer behind me ran over my bike then hit her. Me? Broken Pelvis, complete recovery.
Fifth bike (another FJ1200) Every Sunday I did the "farm road blast" (I like lot of turns). Hit a wet spot and ended up in a recently plowed field. Thought I had control until I hit a small ditch. Threw me and my bike in the air. I walked,the bike needed a subframe tweek and some plastic.
Sixth (VN1500) and Seventh (ZX12R) nothing yet, knock on wood.

I ALWAYS wear all of my equipment, and I'm still riding today because of it. I wouldn't be here otherwise. Rule 12 is gospel!!

MagicRat
03-07-2004, 03:08 PM
Sure, riding bikes is all about the fun. But protective gear lets us have all the fun with less worries. Preparation is the key to a long life of biking. Wearing the helmet and correct gear is part of this.
I truly cannot understand why anyone (who is not actually suicidal) would ride without proper gear.

aussieidiot
04-15-2004, 06:17 PM
how about don't buy second hand helmets and spend as much money on a helmet as you think your head is worth

blackbob
05-14-2004, 10:00 AM
Wow,makes me that much more comfertable about getting a bike.

~BB~

Joelb251
06-04-2004, 10:14 AM
I agree that leather saves! But I also have to note that denim can be just as durable if not more than leather. I went down on a curve, going about 30, wearing helmet, leather, denim jeans, boots, gloves. my 99 shadow went sliding into the crash rail and I slid with it, tumbling the whole way. Needless to say the helmet got scuffed good, my jacket tore to shreds, but my jeans were left unscathed.... Other than bruises on my knee and hip, and stiffness all over, i was uninjured. I would have been alot worse off without gear!

PC800Paul
07-16-2004, 02:53 PM
Wow! What were you wearing? Kevlar jeans? I slipped on a trail while hiking and tore the heck out of the leg and knee of a new pair of jeans. I dropped my CX500 at about 40mph wearing full leathers and only scratched them a little. Perhaps the pavement where you went down was really smooth and you got lucky. Jeans to work a whole lot better than slacks if you commute to work.
Paul in San Jose :cheers:

I agree that leather saves! But I also have to note that denim can be just as durable if not more than leather. I went down on a curve, going about 30, wearing helmet, leather, denim jeans, boots, gloves. my 99 shadow went sliding into the crash rail and I slid with it, tumbling the whole way. Needless to say the helmet got scuffed good, my jacket tore to shreds, but my jeans were left unscathed.... Other than bruises on my knee and hip, and stiffness all over, i was uninjured. I would have been alot worse off without gear!

aussieidiot
07-19-2004, 03:34 AM
jeans are no substitute for leather. fact is jeans will last 6 feet before they wear though compared to leather which will last 60 feet. how long does it take you to slow down from 50mph with brakes? more than 6 feet, so imagine your shedded ass cheeks in jeans.

cmoubell
07-19-2004, 10:23 AM
hey if you don't want to hurt your bum when you fall just pack some bubble wrap in there. heh heh

gsxygirl
10-07-2004, 11:48 AM
this forum gave me the chills when i read it....its not preventing me from getting a bike, but its going to make me think of everybody i love before i take a ride, and think i may never come home again... iv had a bad close call on the back of my ex bf's bike, he was unexpierienced & he decided to nail it and not give me a heads up..i was barly hangin on for my life at about 135, and he didn't even have the curiosidy to slow down knowin he could feel me slippin off the back...i swear the whole time i knew that was it, that i was goin off the back....i swear i cheated death cause the split second i would have gone off, that same second he hit the brakes cause a car pulled out ahead....

jmrev
10-07-2004, 12:57 PM
remember for all of the new riders, DONT RIDE FAST,ive know many that have been injured!

Tetsuo
10-15-2004, 02:47 AM
Like I previously stated in a topic, I feel that these advice topics for new riders are ineffective because they are too vague and broad. Plus they also lack things that seasoned riders think are important topics that should be covered. This will be one of several future posts that I hope to clarify things.

New prospects to the motorcycle world tend to have little clue on what they are getting themselves into. Unlike a bicycle, you can't just get on these machines and exploit them. It's a lot more complex than the twist of the throttle and work on the clutch. People don't understand how physical riding a motorcycle can be.

The riding position alone can put fatigue on a person's body. Rider geometry plays a huge part on safety. If the bars are too low and a bit forward it might create fatigue within the wrists, shoulders, and the upper back. Riding long distances on sport bikes will tire out the body, in which a tired body will make mistakes thus putting themselves in danger.

Another concept on how physical riding a bike can be is how the body is used in different ways to manipulate the bike. The way the rider shifts his body makes huge differences in front end to back end weight. In essense, the rider's weight will shift the overall weight distribution and can do several things with it. One example: the rear wheel begins to spin when launching from a stop. You have two options 1) letting off the throttle a bit 2) move your butt to the back of the seat. Doing both at the same time will bring the best results. This also applies to rolling on the throttle when exiting off a turn. Second example: the front end of the bike beings to lift as you accelerate. An inexperienced rider will probably ease of the throttle a bit to bring the front down. The best way to keep the drive yet alleviate the front end lift is using the legs to push the body forward into the tank which puts more weight onto the front end. This works under braking too. If the rear ends begins to lift shifting the body rearward will help bring the bike down.

Turning the bike at speeds over 25 miles per hour will require some physical force when turning. The bike really wants to go straight. You can move the bars in what direction you want to go but the rear wheel will want to go straight. So the body is used to coax the whole bike to travel into and through turns. This is where things get complex. Leaning the bike over isn't hard but shifting the body around with your arms and legs takes getting use to. If the rear end starts to feel vague while leaning, moving the body to the rear may cure feeling of nothing. Leg's can cramp and get worn out when riding at a fierce pace.

Another part of the body that will get tiresome is the wrists. When under braking whole body wants to move forward thus putting a lot of pressure onto them. When you accelerate harder, your wrists will get a workout as you hold tightly unto the bars.

Aerodynamics will play a part on fatigue. If a sport bike has poor wind protection, accelerating and keeping speeds become a task. The feeling is best described as "being pried off the handle bars". If a rider does a long haul on the highway on a bike with little wind-protection might have no feeling in the upper body since his hands were just holding on so tightly.

If your body is extremely tired don't go any further than you need to because it becomes dangerous. All that I talked about, I doubt a person will get tired riding around town doing tasks like braking and using the body to manipulate the bike. But if you are doing longer hauls you may want to plan on where you take break-stops.

Tetsuo
10-15-2004, 02:58 AM
Rider safety is all about knowledge but there are several things that knowledge can't save you from. All this talk about wearing helmets and leathers, riding within your limit, and obey the rules of the road but how about things that you can't protect yourself from?

Helmets and leathers do provide a good amount of protection but it's all up to a point. Sure leathers have padding in important areas so certain parts are less prone to bruising. How about a highside and you fall on your arm in an awkward position? Your leathers will protect you from road-rash but not from broken bones and dislocated sockets and what have. Your helmet will protect your head but not neck. You can easily fall, slide and have an impact that will break you neck. Typing that I up I instantly think of Daijiro Kato at Suzuka last season. Even riding within your limit won't gaurentee protection from the elements you can't control. Unlike race circuits where there is runoff if a rider falls, real-world environment does not provide runoff so that's when things become truly scary if you put it all into perspective.

Tetsuo
10-15-2004, 03:23 AM
All helmets go through proper crash-test regulations but always find something that fits comfortably yet has a snug fit. Always look for helmets that provide the best ventilation.

Shark Helmets: check out the RS2Fi and RS2 Race (http://www.shark-helmets.com/shark/technical/xagthtml.nsf/xhtmlagent?openagent&xdlk=shark_gp_site)

When it comes to leathers I recommend kangaroo leather rather than cow leather. Kangaroo leather-made suits are lighter and stronger than cow leathers. Look for ones that have good ventilation. Best to read reviews to see what others think.

Too New To Know
10-15-2004, 03:29 AM
its not about eliminating danger, its about minimising danger, you cant be totally safe in any part of life, unless you simply lock yourself in your room and never step outside.. :(

if you train yourself to watch ahead and predict traffic movements, while wearing appropriate gear, your going to minimise the risk of something going wrong, but you'll never be able to stop that stupid son of a b$*ch next to you in there car changing lanes right into you, or the SUV that slams into your ass while your at a stop light, then manages to find the brake pedal when his on TOP of your chest, breaking 43 bones and puncturing your lung..
but hey, this things happen.. and as we say here in australia; when sh*t happens, get a shovel. :D

SamBlob
10-17-2004, 11:00 AM
Ok I gotta say i'm not diagreeing with what your saying but my dad has been riding 20+yrs on and off never once laid a bike down i've been riding 1 1/2 neither have I. i understand that it can happen but to say it WILL is kinda well blunt and untrue i think.

I was on a motorcycle forum with a guy who said he hadn't gone down in 25 years of riding. Within the first two years of my participation in the forum he went down. He was shaken up a bit and considered giving it up, but reconsidered and stayed on the road. A year later he hit a deer and got quite broken up. After the bones healed, he got a "new" old bike and got back on the road.

There are two kinds of riders. Those who have gone down, and those who will go down. Actually, those who have gone down are still likely to go down again...

I have ridden without a helmet, usually when giving someone a lift on the pillion, 'coz I've lent 'em mine. I figure that if something happens, the person who should die for my irresponsibility should be me and not my passenger.

I was one of only two riders I have ever seen wear a leather jacket in Jamaica. I was ridiculed for it often by people who asked me if I was cold. I tell them it's not for cold weather but for hot asphalt. Ridicule can't hurt me. An asphalt surface at 20 mph can.

When I rode, I went down about eight or nine times. The only one that directly involved another vehicle was the last, when a taxi hit my handlebar and I lost control. I had my leather jacket on in all but the first. I had a helmet on in all of them. I am alive and relatively unscarred as a result.

I want another motorcycle. And every time I say or think this my shoulder and wrist begin to ache. But I think this and say this anyway.

I am putting a bicycle together which I intend to ride on the road. It is good exercise and cheap urban transport. It is a lot healthier than a motorcycle. It is not even a tiny bit more safe, however. In fact, it's probably less safe.

PossibleSideEffect
10-21-2004, 03:40 PM
People who say they've never dumped are either lying or haven't ridden enough.

The falling paragraph should have been the VERY FIRST paragraph in the starting post.

FabricGATOR
11-26-2004, 03:20 AM
I just read these three pages of posts.......

Its not IF you'll go down, its WHEN........ and how many times is up to you.

I have a friend who is now parapalegic (loss use of legs) Helmet would have prevented this.

Pre-flight inspect your machine..... Its like skydiving, you would check your parachute first. Every time.
-tire pressure and condition
-fuel
-brake condition and fluid level
-oil
-lights front and rear
-general condition of your machine
-etc........

When you go down, it has been suggested to me that you try to stay with the bike... If you try to kick off of the beast that just threw you, It can slide running in gear, if the tires catch and the bike stands up it'll possibly run you over. This could really ruin your day. (I want to hear comments on this theory)

YOU are responsible for your safety. Any car, bus, cow, pedestrian, dog, geico squirrel, can do anything, at any time. Be prepared for the unexpected..... LOOK FOR IT....IT IS THERE!

Lane position...... dont ride away from the traffic going in the same direction.
EXAMPLE: If in the left lane ride in the right side of your lane nearer to the other cars in the right lane. This keeps your headlight in their sideview mirror longer -AND- Cars overtaking you will allow more spacing before moving over in front of you.
EXAMPLE 2: Center lane, cars on both sides..... ride down the center of your lane....Right lane,oposite of left (once you try this and understand It'll come naturally to you) SEE AND BE SEEN
Remember, if you cant see them in their mirror, they probably cant see you. Dont linger in their blind spot.

I use highbeam headlight all day long. Use directionals... they will help you also SEE AND BE SEEN

Always be in 1st gear and observing in your rearview mirror when stopped. Be ready to go SOMEWHERE if the car about to hit you from behind didnt see you. Sometimes I'll even release and squeze the brake to get the brake light to turn off and on once or twice.

I am always scanning for trouble. I try to make head movement part of my regime. Especially when I am trying to make sure that the old lady that is about to make a right over the top of me, see's me. I'll take a quick look to the left, and if I'm pretty sure that something is not going to jump at me, I'll make a sweeping head movement towards the driver about to make the right turn ....... I find this helps them make eye contact/recognition (still, don't trust eye contact) Be prepared for anything!

When it rains..... Stop light..... You'll have more traction, more stopping power in the puddle on either side of your lane, then in the middle. Here's the deal: Hundreds of cars a day stop at that light, many will drip oil... right down the center. (have you noticed that black streak?) When it rains the water gets through to the asphalt and actuall lifts the oil up.....very slippery. (remember the toll booth falls in the previous posts)

These are some of the things I wanted to impress upon new riders. I enjoy riding and even sometimes without the brain bucket. I try to do it as safe as I can without detracting from the comfort. I think Jousting must really suck. (riding hot sweaty horses at each other, at high speeds, wearing a steel armor and chainmail suit, while pointing sharpened sticks at your opponent) Full leather, helmet, boots, Florida, summer.... not enjoyable.
For me personally, some leather boot that protects the ankle bone is a must. The thought of sliding with the cycle ontop of my leg and grinding away at that bone......

Everyday, we must make a choice as to what extent we are going to sacrafice comfort for safety. It is my beleif that there is also a level of discomfort that becomes a safety issue in itself. Every man dies, but not every man knows how to live well.......

There's not many expierences like blasting north on I-95 at a hundred forty something miles an hour, buck naked at 3am and have a large palmetto bug fly up out of the median and hit you dead smack in the addams apple...... now thats where you descide how you want to live the rest of your life!

porridgewog
12-10-2004, 09:33 AM
Just been looking at the previous pages. Got to agree that it is when you go down, not if. The best way to learn is time in the saddle, and that results in putting yourself in the crosshairs of asshole on the road.

Been riding for around 10 years and started with a triumph Daytona T595. Thought I was invincible with all that power and acceleration, but it took less than two seconds for me to get point fixation on a corner and I stuffed into a barrier at 60mph. I walked away only because I was wearing full leathers and a quality lid. The bike was written off but was rebuilt and we did another 10,000 miles together.

The point? Well it takes time to gain the experience you need, just like anything else in life. New riders dont have to be frightened, but they need to be aware that they will go down at some point. Could be on a corner, could be at a junction (I dropped a fully loaded BMW GS1150 with girlfriend on board at a junction, not very impressive!) It may not be your fault, but the more miles and hours you do, you will become acutley aware of what you are doing along with everyone else around you. Thats the holy grail, guessing what everyone will do around you.

I ride in the UK and Europe, but at the moment I am living in Dubai. The roads are amazing, the Police dont care and we regularly have 160mph plus breakfast runs here. But when the traffic starts, everyone is out for themselves. Thats where your experience is learnt and where you can use it. Any idiot can do full throttle all day long, but it takes a good rider to be able to make a decision as to where and when its best.

Speed does not kill, its stupidity that does. After all, accidents happen in one place, so spend as little time in that place as you can!

Happy trails

Tom O
12-25-2004, 06:25 AM
I agree about the leathers and one thing that hasn't been mentioned here is how plastic /nylon based clothes can melt into the skin from the friction of the slide. As far as helmets are concerned its your life you can be any vegetable you want if you chose to rat race at high speeds it is best to pick out a casket beforehand. The design of most Jap bikes will send you through the air like a rocket! know your skill & limitations .

Sheresh07
02-06-2005, 02:10 AM
About a year ago when I still lived up in Buffalo NewYork there were I think 3 or 4 bikers up there, sport bikes ofcourse, and I lived on this nice long stretch of striaght awy, I think it was probably a good 3 miles long, and those bikes just loved to go flying down it top speed.

My house sat ontop of a small hill right across from a Legion hall, and this legion hall had a few very well grown pines right infront of the driveway making it very difficult to pull out of because you almost always couldnt see what was coming.

So anyways I was outside mowing the front lawn and I hear the bike coming, and its frigging flying, I mean I could hear it peeling out at the light and man the engine roaring, never heard anything more beautiful, and the guy on the bike must have been thinking the same thing because just as he was coming up on the legion hall a mini-van pulled right out infront of him, seeing him too late hit the brakes, he didnt swerve, hit the side head on, went UP and OVER the hood of the van INTO oncoming traffic.

Sadly this guy never had a second chance, he was killed by a lane of traffic, as I recall it was a small semi that ran over him befor it could stop. This guy probably would have survived, or not even had the accident had he not been driving recklessly.

After that I have had MUCH MUCH more respect for bikes on the road and ALWAYS try to give them as much room as possible wether I'm passing them, or they are passing me or I'm just driving behind one. Oh and I dont think this guys funeral was an open casket most of the riders in the area didnt wear any protective gear other then a helmet.

Z_Fanatic
02-06-2005, 02:59 AM
Sportbikes are generally far more stable at high speeds than low speeds. Especially with good tires, one can just “feel” the tractions good as cars. But some riders often inherit a false sense of security or invincibility because of smooth stability, which sometimes causes them to overestimate their skill and confidence. So whenever they open full throttle as early as possible for the maximum rush, they often forget to realize that they’re still on two wheels on public roads occupied by soccer moms. It's not the track.

lmno
05-14-2005, 01:49 PM
I want to thank all of you for your post. I too was considering a motorcycle. I was gonna take the basic riders course, get me a ninja 500 or a gs 500 and practice my skill. I live on a military base which requires another safety course just to ride on base. I was planning on just on base to and from work, since it is much safer than riding in town. I have now can to the decision that a bike is not for me thanks to this post. It is not a bad thing. I was just so unsure if I should get one or not and since I am that unsure its probably not for me. My decision was based on just being bored, were im at there is not much to do. I am young, 20 married with an 8 month old child. I just think riding is not worth it, just to satisfy my boredom. I'm gonna use the money I would have used for a motorcycle to buy my daughter and wife a puppy. thank you all

speediva
05-25-2005, 12:09 PM
I want to thank all of you for your post. I too was considering a motorcycle. I was gonna take the basic riders course, get me a ninja 500 or a gs 500 and practice my skill. I live on a military base which requires another safety course just to ride on base. I was planning on just on base to and from work, since it is much safer than riding in town. I have now can to the decision that a bike is not for me thanks to this post. It is not a bad thing. I was just so unsure if I should get one or not and since I am that unsure its probably not for me. My decision was based on just being bored, were im at there is not much to do. I am young, 20 married with an 8 month old child. I just think riding is not worth it, just to satisfy my boredom. I'm gonna use the money I would have used for a motorcycle to buy my daughter and wife a puppy. thank you all
THANK YOU! People who listen make all this ranting worth-while! Congrats to you on your baby, and good luck finding something to ease your boredom! :D

Aluli
06-13-2005, 04:43 PM
Thanks for posting all your great replies. I am new to this forum. I try to find material for my husband to read regarding helmets. I sent him an email "Advice to new riders". He isnt a new rider but is very reluctant to wearing the helmet. 2 years ago, he crashed his '02 Suzuki 600GSXR and it was the day he happened to be wearing it. Another motorcycle in the opposite direction crossed the yellow and he swerved to avoid that, went off the road hitting a gopher hole. The front tire dug in and he flipped the bike. The bike went over and over punching the dirt..he was thrown off obviously. He was lucky not to have been hit by the bike. He was in the hospital 3 days with a broken arm and his neck in a brace and alot of red abrasion.

Well....Now he owns a '05 Suzuki 750GSXR and I agreed to matching jacket with skid plates and cool matching sparkling helmet. I passed him one day going home and he had the helmet clipped to the side of the bike. I was so mad. Told him he was selfish not thinking of his family when he splatters his brain. He knows the risks. So, this is why I hunt for these sites about training and safety.

I own a '03 Sukuki 650 SV with full fairing. Matching silver jacket with skit plates and sparkly helmet. I ride with both at all times. This is my second bike. I had a '86 Honda Hurricane 600 before and we sold both bikes after the crash.

I am taking the STAR safety class next month. I am told that everybody gets something out of the class. Experienced riders or new.

Happy Riding Everyone. Thanks for listening!

Km-t
06-23-2005, 08:45 AM
I'm all for wearing a helmet. I know it's no guarantee but its better than nothing. I'm all for the preventative measures because they can make a difference. Football player wear mouth guards even though they may not ever be struck in the head (or at least they should - but then I'm also a sports medic so I may be a little biased). I'm from New Zealand, and it is law hear to wear a seatbelt. It sort of come down to that old saying
"Why cut off your nose to spite your face?"

Ultimately though it is the riders choice, law or no law.
I'll respect your decision, and you don't have to care what I may think, (but privately I will still think you're a bit dumb)

However protective gear is no substitute for common sense. A friend of mine lost a very close family friend over her own 3 months ago to a motorcycle accident. They were riding in a group - full marks for that safety method.

She was riding pillion and was new the motorcycling experience so how she went out was not nice. Her boyfriend was the driver and should have know way better. As I said they were riding in a group. I'm guessing they were near the back as before he took his turn others in his group passed a truck (sorry don't know how long but must have been long enough). However when his turn came the truck had begun turning and as you all (should??) know, no matter what type of vehicle you are in/on you should never pass a turning truck (or other long vehicle). He Did. He died and killed her as well. Wasn't nice for the emergency services on the scene as she was mostly decapitated. Very little tissue kept her head connected to her body. Most definitely not nice for the family member who had to formally identify her.

Moral of the story:
There is no substiture for common sense and defensive driving/riding!!

Happy Riding

Aluli
06-26-2005, 05:29 AM
That's sad, km-t.

chubster2003
06-27-2005, 10:47 AM
wow.. not cool..

Night Rider
07-12-2005, 12:14 PM
man that hit me hard... thats very sad...

anyways with your limits and everything .. they do it on the track all the time so i should try to right?....wrong... on the track you crash theres people there in 1-2 mins... on the street it could take 5 mins too 1 hour depending on where you are.. so yah common sense is a big thing... i only ride a dual sport xl 80... (only 15) and when im doin tricks on it i don't where a helment ... or if im fooling around .. but if i do any riden over say 5 mins i wear one.... I don't really care about my life that much... but i care about peoples feelings ... and i hate to see people/friends/family cry over me... or get hurt cuz of me....

just with that thing there... i see alot of girls on back of bikes with there boy friends ..with there whole back showing...(no armor, just a string) and i always think.. how that would hurt if they flipped it or something.... wouldn't be good..

well... wish you all the best and safe rides...

diesel1962
01-15-2006, 06:07 PM
Hello.Havent been on a bike in 20 years.Just bought a Honda 450 Nighthawk last July.Did some work to it,And did not have much riding time last year,Cause it gets cold quick in Michigan.Plan riding the bike to work and back this summer,Also do some weekend travel with it.I do not ride fast,Nor do I take chances.And ALWAYS on the look out for other vehicles.I do not even like riding in the dark. Also I beleve in leathers and helmets.I have no windshield,Nor do I plan on installing one on my bike.Just be careful and be aware of your sorroundings. Diesel 1962

Cessna310
02-10-2006, 12:15 AM
I was wondering if a Ninja 250R would be a good bike to start with my friends say its a little step up from a scooter! :( and i should get a 600 First bike for me could you give me advice i road dirt bikes growing up but thats all ive got what do you thnk please help

3000gtdj
03-10-2006, 11:54 AM
I was wondering if a Ninja 250R would be a good bike to start with my friends say its a little step up from a scooter! :( and i should get a 600 First bike for me could you give me advice i road dirt bikes growing up but thats all ive got what do you thnk please help


Hell no a 600 is to fast. Kawasaki makes a ninja500 that I hear is good to start. On Suzuki has the sv650 and a gf500. There are plenty of good starter bikes but I dont think any of them are a 600

tractorboy
05-08-2006, 09:09 AM
I use to have motorcycles, Triumphs, BSA, Ducati, Honda, Yamaha, Moto Guzzi. That was a while ago. I enjoyed them then. Do not ever plan to get one again. I cringe though when I see ppl go by on a motocycle with shorts and soft shoes like loafers. The second worst is wearing a back pack. I hope it never happens to you. In the event that you find you are rolling a long the ground, which can happen and like i said before , i hope it does not happen to you. A back will snap your neck for sure.

Abe12
06-15-2006, 07:59 AM
If your dad has been riding that long has not laid it down thats great. I'm not being sarcastic, thats great. You too. I pray you both never go down. I have never laid down either. But i have been hit on a clam day by a driver that was not paying attention, and it nearly killed me. If a cars has a fenderbender that ruins your day. If a motorcycle has a fenderbenders it destroys your life.

I have to say im a little suprised to see a firefighter say not to wear helmets, and while I agree that they are not guarantee that you will live through an accident, they are most certinly a guarantee of rasing your chances of surviving, compared to no head protection at all. As im sure you allready know that brain can have severe damage and be destroyed at an impact as little as 1/2 mile per hour. I do agree in personal freedom and individual choices, and if you are THAT against helmets that you chose not to wear them, that that is your personal choice. Live and let live. But i would encourage all motorcyclist to wear all available protection at all times. We loose to many brothers the way it is.
As for scaring new riders, well if it scares them then fine. I believe it to be the truth, and i think everyone should consider it. Everytime you go out you might not come back. I think i large part of RESPONSIBLE riding is being able to acknowlege this. I dont think that new riders should twist the throttle with out thinking about ALL the POSSBILE risks associated with the sport we all love so much. Further i believe that if a new rider knows this, acknowleges this and still choses to ride he or she will be a better rider for it.

At anyrate, i hope we all stay safe, and wish the best for all motorcyclist.

As a last note, any new riders, or anyone for that matter should feel free to PM me with any questions, no matter how insignificant. I would like to be able to help anyone and everyone ride safer and better. (though i am by no means a professor of motorcyles, but i have plenty of experience.)

I read a couple of your posts. I think you are right on the money. I'm a new rider (3 years) and the thought of running into a car realy freaks me out.
Especialy after what hapened to Ben Rothlessberger.

Abe12

RM|ZX:Dudz
02-17-2007, 12:52 PM
I read a couple of your posts. I think you are right on the money. I'm a new rider (3 years) and the thought of running into a car realy freaks me out.
Especialy after what hapened to Ben Rothlessberger.

Abe12

I just got my first bike bout month ago... Kawasaki ZZR250... should i get fully comp. insurance? PM me if u can help me out

Blazr2
10-19-2008, 11:00 PM
Couldn't agree more with the 1st post. The one of listed things a new rider should do. Good advice! I've been riding for over 30 years and never been down. I remember the spills I took as a young child on a bicycle and still haven't forgot how bad the road can be! I wear good protective gear.
Its better to spend $500 or more on a good jacket and helmet then to spend $5000 or more for surgery and skin grafts!

Torch
10-20-2008, 01:02 AM
I agree Blazr2 buy the gear it may save your life, I went down in August wearing a full face helmet and full leathers and hit the asphalt doing 50mph, I walked away with a bloody nose and (in hind sight) minor road rash on both arms. I could have chosen to go to the hospital when the ambulance showed up but didn't, as it was all I ended up needing was large band aids and three weeks of time and my skin healed up.

I don't even want to think about what would have happened if I had been wearing jeans and a t-shirt, I got back on and 78 miles later I was back home and parked it for three weeks until my arms healed up, had it not been for my gear I would probably still be in the hospital.

t_arnold
10-21-2008, 09:50 AM
ok not to be a guy or anything, but do i even need to make a joke about the last two sentences in girli97qt's post??????

but seriously. im a car guy, new to cycles, i repect the views of older, and more experienced riders. however i think that to approach the sport from the point of view that its all buisness and no fun, its not right. also coming from a harly family background, the view on helmets is slightly different. on a sport bike, at speed, in traffic, yes, i totally and completey support the use of full coverage helmets. however they are not always needed, and can in fact, cause fatal injuries, do to skull bounce. laying down a bike, or worse, falling backwards off one, if you hit on the flesh, you get road rash, hit with a helmet, and it can bounce back hard enough to break your neck. i have known three people this has happend to. i do not mean to counter anyone on here, seeing as i do not even own a motorcycle at this point, however i thought it was a point someone should bring up. remember guys, as serious a deal as this sport can be, i think its safe to say that eveyone does it becaue its fun, and you enjoy it. try also to pass that part along to those prepairing to join ya on the road.

(1) "Coming from a Harley background, the view on helmets is slightly different. on a sport bike, at speed, in traffic, yes, i totally and completey support the use of full coverage helmets." Explain to me why riding a sportbike in traffic is different than riding a Harley in traffic? I have heard this argument many times. "Riding a sport bike you need a full coverage helmet, on a cruiser, you don't" I have been riding for 22 years, cruisers, sport bikes, and a goldwing. I use my full face helmet 90% of the time. The other 10% I use my Modular. Mainly for charity rides and group rides, because it makes communications easier when you are riding in formation because you can flip the chin bar up to talk.
(2)"however they are not always needed, and can in fact, cause fatal injuries, do to skull bounce. laying down a bike, or worse, falling backwards off one, if you hit on the flesh, you get road rash, hit with a helmet, and it can bounce back hard enough to break your neck. i have known three people this has happend to." If you are wearing a turtle shell, as some cruiser riders do, when you hit on the back of the head, the helmet can slide up enough to crack your skull. I have seen this happen a couple of times. At least with a full face, you have more protection from front, side & rear impact than with a turtle shell, or no helmet. I also know that when wearing a backpack, there is more risk of a broken neck because the backpack will hit before your head. You run more of a risk of Fatal injuries with a turtle shell or no helmet than you do with a full face helmet. A helmet is always needed, You never know when something will happen. You can run to the corner store for a pack of smokes, and get hit from the rear waiting to pull into your driveway, this happened to a neighbor. He wasn't wearing his helmet, he got rolled up over the hood. got a concussion from hitting the windshield with the back of his head as well as needing stitches. I'm not saying a helmet would have helped the concussion, but it would have helped with not needing stitches. Anothe freind of mine, who usually rides with a turtle shell, wore his full face one morning because it was cold & rainy. He got hit by a car and went down on his right side, He came out of it pretty well. Twisted ankle, bruises, Scuffed leathers, and a big scrape up the right side of the helmet and face shield. If he had been wearing his turtle shell, it would have been his face that got ground up. He was lucky. Sorry to be long winded. I just had to make a couple of comments.

craig p
09-13-2020, 04:24 AM
one piece of advice for you listen dont talk you mite just survive this chapter i got no room for know it all already additudes from a 21 year old that is arrogant enouch to make the statment you just made just saying

carbuilder2002
09-13-2020, 06:54 AM
My god I have been riding bikes since 1973, my advice get all the protective gear you can. No matter how good a rider you are it's the other idiot who is going to beat you up unless you get over confident on a bend. If it'sok for the pro's it good enough for me.

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