Automotive History trivia part III


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Chris
12-01-2001, 10:47 PM
OK, heres the question: What is the first American car that has a plastic body to be mass produced.

Hint: its not the corvette.

RazorGTR
12-02-2001, 03:58 AM
I believe it was the Feiro if that is how it is spelt.

Chris
12-02-2001, 07:49 PM
Nope, try 35+ years earlier (and its "fiero")

RazorGTR
12-02-2001, 10:50 PM
damn...... ok I will work on it

NJTy180
12-03-2001, 09:06 AM
Well, I hope its not the Corvette, especially since its made out of Fiberglass...... but anyway...

my first guess is the Amphicar (aka boat-car)

Chris
12-03-2001, 01:11 PM
Fiberglass counts, its really glass re-inforced plastic. Which is what this car is.

NJTy180
12-03-2001, 02:53 PM
fiberglass does not count.... but anyway...its something made 1966 or earlier so you say, and if its not the Corvette (which you think is plastic), then it has to be made before 1953, cause the Vette was the first fiberglass production car...

NJTy180
12-03-2001, 03:02 PM
ok, I am gonna go with 1952 Glasspar G2 Roadster or the 1953 Kaiser-Darrin Convertible, neither of which I feel count as a "mass production" vehicle, especially since the Glasspar was also a "kit car" and there werent very many made before the Vette came out.

NJTy180
12-03-2001, 05:19 PM
c'mon damnit, REPLY!!!!

Chris
12-04-2001, 11:38 AM
Sorry, I was working last night. But I think you're right:alien2:

I will have to double check. It started production in 1952, and several hundred were fully built then sold. They were available in kit form, though.

This info was taken from Automobile quarterly, 1972, no. 4 (or 2, I will check tonight)

NJTy180
12-04-2001, 12:27 PM
Originally posted by Chris
Sorry, I was working last night. But I think you're right:alien2:


its cool, i was just bustin ur chops. I had to look high and low for that info.... :D

Chris
12-05-2001, 07:55 PM
The correct answer is the Woodill Wildfire. They also made glaspar kits for stock chassis' (so you can be considered correct) They began production in 1952m with a fiberglass body. They were available as both a kit and a fully completed production car, although several hundred were made this way. It was a low-slung roadster. It used many parts from the Jeep!! It was based on the jeep chassis also, but the 90hp engine could be replaced by a Cadillac or Ford engine on request. Production ended in 1958.

So, the new question is: How many acres of soy beans was Henry Ford growing in 1935 to be used to make car bodies, trim, shock oil, paint ingredients, etc.


Good luck;)

NJTy180
12-06-2001, 12:21 PM
ok, did a little research...

in 1935, Henry Ford was putting approximately 1 bushel of soy in each vehicle.
The 1935 production year totaled 820,253 automobiles.
The 1935 Soy bean crop yielded almost 16 bushels per acre.

Doing the math, 820,253/15.6 = 52,581 Acres of Soy to produce his automobiles.

Chris
12-06-2001, 12:36 PM
My source says 12000 acres were being grown by Ford. I will have to check tonight (maybe he had 12000 additional acres planned for new stuff), or it might mention your figure somewhere.

NJTy180
12-06-2001, 01:11 PM
nah, i could be way off. my answer is purely statistical. what ford ACTUALLY used might be something else.... dont start doubting youself

Chris
12-07-2001, 01:51 PM
You were so close. He used approximately 1000000 bushels of soy bean in 1935. He did have 12000 acres, but he might have bought some from outside sources, but it doesnt say either way.

Next question: On the Duesenberg model J, SJ, and SSJ, the chassis had a self lubrication system. It would have a light come on telling you that is was having an oil pump lube all of the moving parts, and another light to tell you the system was empty. Another light was used to tell you the battery needed checking. This kept the car in tip-top shape.
So, how often did this system repeat itself?

hakka
12-07-2001, 04:15 PM
every 3000 miles :confused:

Chris
12-07-2001, 11:01 PM
Not even close!! Remember, this was the dark ages, and to keep stuff going good it needed caring VERY often.

hakka
12-07-2001, 11:24 PM
500 miles....just stabbing in the dark:)

Chris
12-07-2001, 11:39 PM
Your stabbing the donkeys head when your aiming for the donkeys tail :)

NJTy180
12-08-2001, 10:32 AM
i'll give it a shot on monday. my weekends are too busy.....

Chris
12-12-2001, 12:57 PM
The answer is: 75 miles

Hudson
12-14-2001, 10:55 AM
What is the oldest, unchanged (this is key) brand name used on cars?

Polygon
12-14-2001, 11:02 AM
Isn't it Oldsmobile?

dejoux
12-22-2001, 04:56 AM
Thats a pretty vauge question, the way i interpret it Id say Rover but I could be well off.

How about some trivia that isnt american car based

TheMan5952
01-02-2002, 03:42 AM
I would say Daimler-Chrysler ior Chevrolet

Hudson
01-02-2002, 02:33 PM
Chevrolet dates back to 1911..and even General Motors is only a few years older than that (1908). DaimlerChrysler can trace its history back to 1925 (Chrysler), 1914 (Dodge), and about 1890 (Daimler and Benz).

The answer is Studebaker and Marmon. Both companies produced cars (Studebaker from the early 1900s until 1966 and Marmon from the early 1900s until around 1935 even though trucks continued until 1997) and both started operations in the 1850s. Both companies are still in business today.

Hmm.....non-American based trivia.....

Until I come up with an original non-North American based question, here's one for you (borrowed from another source):

What was the first production car powered by a V6 engine?

Chris
01-02-2002, 03:10 PM
When Hudson said studebaker, I remembered that they used to make horse-drawn carriages, and they are the right answer.

As for the V6, I have no idea. Perhaps a Buick?

Hudson
01-04-2002, 11:41 AM
Not a Buick.

And both Studebaker and Marmon date back to the 1850s...I just haven't been able to track down exact incorporation dates for each of them to find which one's older. I've been told that it's actually Marmon.

Thunda Downunda
03-09-2002, 06:12 PM
Hmm .. was it the Lancia Aurelia?

Knowing you though, it's probably a 1903 Doppleganger or somesuch ;)

blewistx
05-05-2002, 04:52 PM
The Woodill Wildfire was the first production fiberglass car in 1952 manufactured in Downey Cal. by Woody Woodill with body by Glasspar (Bill Tritt) on a Willy's running gear and a willys Fhead inline six. The picture is my 1954 Wildfire this was a kit with Ford chassis and Mercury flathead V8. Found in a barn in upstate NY and rebuilt and restored in 1976.

Chris
05-06-2002, 04:47 PM
I would have to say that you are a member with perhaps the most exclusive car here;)

Thanks, I wanted to know what it actually looked like.


PS Hudson, could you please tell us the correct answer?

Hudson
06-22-2002, 01:38 AM
Thunda got it right..it was the Lancia.

woodman
08-26-2002, 02:48 AM
You might be interested in knowing that the prototype Wildfire has been restored in California. It even has the original tires. At the Santa Barbara Concours, a judge said that he could see that they even had the Orginal air in them.

Car belongs to a guy named Fred Roth. who I think lives near Westlake. My two sons were singularly unimpressed at what their grandfather had been up to in the 50's.

Mike Woodill
Santa Barbara CA

tigermiata
12-31-2002, 09:48 AM
"The fastest potato on the table" :smoker2:

dchadwickinetone
05-21-2003, 10:42 PM
:) We have questions about fiberglass cars before the Corvette? Let's clear this one up. Yes there were way more than 300 Glaspar G2's built before 1953 according to the man in charge so the Corvette did not catch up for a while after that. Yes, they were what we would consider "kit-cars" but they were available built up and the "Post frame", that's Shorty Post not Wiley Post, was a Glaspar item not just a Woody Woodill innovation. There was competition history too, west coast races and believe it or not, the Mexican Road Race in 1953. Various degrees of low-key involvement, yes, but they were right there so all you Glaspar owners can feel you have one up one the C-Type Jag guys on the Carrera, your car is real.

2strokebloke
08-08-2003, 11:24 AM
Well this thread looks like it died... So, here's a real easy double question for you American car nuts...

After Ransom Olds left Oldsombile, what car company did he form? And what was name of the "best" car he designed for this company?

tigermiata
08-08-2003, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by 2strokebloke
Well this thread looks like it died... So, here's a real easy double question for you American car nuts...

After Ransom Olds left Oldsombile, what car company did he form? And what was name of the "best" car he designed for this company?

"Best"? I dunno. Flying Cloud? Royale? I'm probably missing the 'intended' answer on this one.

Hudson
08-08-2003, 02:07 PM
Originally posted by tigermiata


"Best"? I dunno. Flying Cloud? Royale? I'm probably missing the 'intended' answer on this one.

I think you're on the right track...but you missed the first part of the question. Ransom Olds formed REO.

2strokebloke
08-08-2003, 11:12 PM
REO is the company, I guess I should rephrase the second part: What was his "Farewell" model for REO?

2strokebloke
08-20-2003, 03:11 PM
REO is the company, I guess I should rephrase the second part: What was his "Farewell" model for REO?

For the love of Walter P. Chrysler the answer is "REO the Fifth" Rason said that this model marked the limit of his engineering expertise, and that he couldn't design anything better if he tried, and therefore was leaving the company.
New EASY question:

What Chevrolet model, meant to compete with the Ford model T, was named after it's price?

Hudson
08-20-2003, 03:51 PM
For the love of Walter P. Chrysler the answer is "REO the Fifth" Rason said that this model marked the limit of his engineering expertise, and that he couldn't design anything better if he tried, and therefore was leaving the company.
New EASY question:

What Chevrolet model, meant to compete with the Ford model T, was named after it's price?

Chevrolet 390

2strokebloke
08-20-2003, 06:47 PM
Chevrolet 390

Almost - try something a little more expensive though.

Mr. Chevelle
08-28-2003, 01:03 AM
Chevrolet Four-Ninety (490).

2strokebloke
08-30-2003, 12:13 PM
Chevrolet Four-Ninety (490).

You're correct - your turn to ask a question.

ARZENSJARAY
10-12-2003, 04:58 PM
its cool, i was just bustin ur chops. I had to look high and low for that info.... :D
HELLO!is there anybody out there?

D14D
11-05-2003, 02:30 AM
ford mustang

or dodge charger

2strokebloke
11-05-2003, 03:58 PM
ford mustang

or dodge charger

That's not actually a question, you have to ask one like this: What year did the VW beetle's engine's power output jump from 36hp to 40hp?

Whoever answers that question can ask the next one.

Duesey
11-22-2003, 11:11 PM
That's not actually a question, you have to ask one like this: What year did the VW beetle's engine's power output jump from 36hp to 40hp?

Whoever answers that question can ask the next one.
August 1965, but since that was the beginning of the 1966 model year, that would mean that only 1966 and on W Beetles would have the new (at that time) 40 hp 1285 cc engine, which had the same crankshaft as the bigger VW 1500 engine. Unlike rover, which never called the Cooper a '1300' VW distinguished the new engine with "1300" badges on the hood. These newer 1966 model year cars also featured the 1500's wheels, and larger turn signal indicators.

2strokebloke
11-23-2003, 12:35 AM
The increase from 36 to 40hp happened earlier than that (for export models anyway)

Duesey
11-24-2003, 01:35 AM
The increase from 36 to 40hp happened earlier than that (for export models anyway)
Specificity in all things! You were looking for 1961, when the compression ratio of the 1200 jumped up to 7:1, and power jumped to 40 hp, wheren't you?

2strokebloke
11-24-2003, 12:51 PM
Specificity in all things! You were looking for 1961, when the compression ratio of the 1200 jumped up to 7:1, and power jumped to 40 hp, wheren't you?

Yes I was, and you're correct so you get to ask the next question.

Duesey
11-24-2003, 09:27 PM
Hmmm. What was the first car to have idiot lights?

2strokebloke
11-26-2003, 01:59 PM
That's an incredibly hard question, mabe you should give a hint, like country of origin.

tigermiata
11-28-2003, 11:53 AM
Hmmm. What was the first car to have idiot lights?

Kaiser?

Duesey
12-01-2003, 10:10 PM
That's an incredibly hard question, mabe you should give a hint, like country of origin.

American.

Kaiser?

No, but that was probably the first company to offer sliding doors on a car.

Chris
12-02-2003, 02:10 AM
Im going to guess Duesenberg.....just as a guess, and because they were one of the most advanced cars in the world at the time.

Duesey
12-03-2003, 02:29 AM
Im going to guess Duesenberg.....just as a guess, and because they were one of the most advanced cars in the world at the time.
If that was really just a guess...it was a damn good one! Duesenberg introduced idiot lights on its Model J in December of 1928 at the New York Auto Show. The car featured lights on the dash that would alert the owner as the the status of his engine's oil (like when it needed to be changed), and the status of the automatic chassis lubrication system (the system would flash when it was being operated, and when it needed oil). All the lights were operated mechanically and were activated by certain mileage points (every 1500 miles for the chassis system, 3000 to change the oil) or resevoirs (as with the chassis oil). Good guess! Now you ask a question.

Chris
12-03-2003, 04:50 AM
Now that you've posted that, it pretty much came back to me. The car even had a system which would oil/grease parts that needed it every 75miles, and a light came on when the system needed refilling. Pretty amazing for the late 20's.

My question is a fair bit simpler, but, still a good one:

Which company won the contract to produce the first 'Jeep', by winning the design competetion the US Army had to develop a good general purpose vehicle (there were alot of requirments, and just a few months to make a prototype...kinda nuts, really. And General Purpose, GP, geep, jeep)

Hint, they lost it pretty quickly, and then that company semi-lost it, having to share it with someone else.

Duesey
12-03-2003, 11:08 PM
Willys-Overland originally won the contract, but soon lost it to Ford simply b/c Ford had much larger production capabilities that Willy's. Willy's did retain the name, patents on design, and did produce a good numbers. I've driven a '44 Wlly's Jeep before, fun truck!

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