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Advice for First Restoration

12-04-2016, 05:01 PM
Hey everyone, I am a brand new user of AF. I honestly just now made an account for this. I am a college student and have wanted to restore an old car or pickup for years now. Sadly, my dad was never a huge car guy, and nobody else in my family really was either so I don't know much about cars. So any and all helpful comments/advice would be greatly appreciated.

First off, being my first time potentially restoring a car, what general advice would you give to me?

Second, what are some things that I need to know before considering moving forward at all with a restoration?

Third, what should I start off with doing to find a good car that is relatively easy to restore, won't cost too much, will look sharp, and how do I go about that?

If this forum works well and I get good responses then I plan to continue using this for future advice, so I don't need any real specific details, mostly just general stuff to consider for brand new starting out of the project.

I look forward to your responses!

02-07-2017, 09:54 AM
1.Have a goal from the get go and set milestones to work towards as it is going to be a long ride.2.Take your time and do it right. 3.Spare no expense. 4.Keep as original as possible.

02-07-2017, 10:46 AM
Ho Zagone,
Well I started my first restoration when I was 22. Somewhat recklessly I bought what looked quite a tidy E type Jaguar needing what appeared to be light restoration. It actually passed an MOT with only basic mechanical work to the brakes and suspension.
After a few months driving the car and going to various Jaguar meets it became clear that it could be made a lot better with further work, that further work revealed a massive amount of filler and many new panels welded in. Some 4 years latter and it was getting very admiring looks from the seasoned owners.
My advice is get something you really want to own otherwise you wont have the drive to see it through. Be prepared to learn many new skills ideally find a college that runs restoration classes or get taught by people skilled in various fields. Always aim for the best possible finish and standard that you can achieve.
yes it is difficult, yes it's frustrating, yes it's expensive, yes it puts a strain on your social life.
But my god the end result it what makes it worth it all.
Good luck and I mean that truly it's a great hobby.

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