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Polishing and sanding


tpliquid
04-04-2016, 12:40 PM
Ok so i never cared about my finishing as much as before. So after clear coat. I sand down with 3200 grit then polish with compound and then polish. Sometimes I can still see the sand marks from the sand paper. Sometimes I get it pretty well like on fenders where I cant see the marks or swirls. But on the hood and roofs I can deftinally see it more there.

I was wondering what you guys did in your steps to get super glassy look?

Am I sanding too hard? Not polishing it enough? need more abbrasive polish?

I'l Post pics later

Pugnuts
04-04-2016, 09:11 PM
I start with #800, then #1000, #1200 etc all way to #12000. 10 grits in total. Then course medium and fine polish. Lots of work but my golden rule for painting is : "There are no shortcuts".

stevenoble
04-05-2016, 03:39 AM
What paint and clear coat do you use and what compound and polish..? Some paints are softer and require more care/gentle products or they will scratch and marr easily. Some paints, such as 2k clear, are very hard and require a much more abrasive compound/polish combination to bring them to a good gloss. Generally I use model products compound polishes on model paints, but proper auto products on 2k clear to get the desired results. Also use a really good, soft microfibre cloth, it can make all the difference to the finish and imparts less scratches into the surface.

cjsbosox
04-05-2016, 01:35 PM
I love using this stuff.
http://www.autogeek.net/meguiars-da-microfiber-polish.html#reviews

tpliquid
04-05-2016, 04:41 PM
Thanks for the feedback.
Paint is from scalefinishes.com
I am using mr super clear cans.
Polish I am using Automotive products , 3d international HD polish and menzerna medium cut polish. I use microfiber towels from autozone. Maybe I should get more higher quality microfiber towels.

I think I should do what pugnuts do. Work it up instead of going from 3200 straight to polishing.

stevenoble
04-05-2016, 07:16 PM
I only sand the surface if I have imperfections to remove or really bad orange peel texture. If the surface is good I go straight to the compound. The less sanding you have to do the less scratches you will impart into the surface.

MPWR
04-05-2016, 08:32 PM
If the surface is good I go straight to the compound. The less sanding you have to do the less scratches you will impart into the surface.

I enthusiastically agree.

This to me is the key to a good finish. But I go one step further- I do not ever sand the last layer of paint/clearcoat- I go straight to compound. The trick is to make sure that the surface is compound ready.

I suppose it works for some people, but I have never been happy with the results of sanding a painted finish through multiple levels of abrasive cloth. Like you, I find that there are ALWAYS scratches remaining. I hate the constant risk of grinding through paint. And I find it to be absurdly tedious- there are many other ways I find I can better direct my efforts.

My painting process is as follows:

Prime, prime, prime. This is where most of my painting effort goes. Prime, sand, make it perfect. If it takes a week, it is time well spent. But if the primer is perfect, a great paint job is easy. If it is imperfect, paint and clearcoat will never fix it.

Paint. I spray lacquers with low working pressure and lots of thinner. I apply paint only until it is even and fully opaque. If there are flaws (texture, debris, etc) I gently sand them out and then apply another layer. But the final layer is not sanded.

Clearcoat. Again, I use lacquer clear with low pressure and lots of thinner. It must be applied slowly and patiently- otherwise the lacquer thinner will eat the paint under it. Six to eight coats are what I tyipicaly apply. Again if there are flaws (texture, debris, etc) I gently sand them out and then apply another layer. But the final layer is never sanded.

Let it outgas for a week, then rub it out with polish compound. I like to start with a cotton flannel cloth and Tamiya coarse compound.

It does take time and patience to paint this way. I am never done in a day, or even a weekend. But I find it much easier to get fantastic results this way then by sanding.

Khier
04-07-2016, 12:22 PM
You should sand only as much as necessary. If it is rough, go rough, and successively use finer grit. However, if you need to start with, say 800, you should know it was not the best paint application in the world. Perhaps you should apply another layer (or partial layer) after grinding the roughness and sand/polish again.

Khier
04-07-2016, 12:25 PM
and ALWAYS use wet sanding.

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