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Best clear coat?


MaRiO FDZ
03-04-2015, 09:12 PM
H
What is the best clear coat you use?
Future yellows and cracks over time.
Tamiya Clear is too hot for Tamiya spray cans.
Any suggestions?
I normally use Tamiya Ts colors, 3 layers and get a super glossy finish, no extras needed. EXCEPT this time I MUST paint a color that requires a gloss over coat.

Thank you

Take care

SmokeyR67
03-05-2015, 02:09 AM
I've had good results with Alclad's clear (alc 600), used it first in about 2011 and theres no sign of yellowing yet.

ekha
03-05-2015, 06:35 AM
All my models coated with 2K. I think this is best clear coat.

BVC500
03-05-2015, 08:44 AM
What are you talking about, that Tamiya clear is too hot for Tamiya spray cans? Its designed for it, and I used it all the time.

lovegt40
03-05-2015, 09:03 AM
Gunze gx 100 works great for me. is also relatively new product.
Also gunze top coat (blue spray can) is very good too for me.

MaRiO FDZ
03-05-2015, 10:02 AM
What are you talking about, that Tamiya clear is too hot for Tamiya spray cans? Its designed for it, and I used it all the time.

The composition is different, and I've read that it either you use it shortly after TS color coats or wait like 2 weeks till they have completely cured, or the paint finish will be altered.

Either way, I wouldn't know, I'm having a hard time getting Tamiya Spray cans anyway.

Take care

Hemi Killer
03-05-2015, 10:20 AM
I use Dupli-Color Paint Shop. Its quart of pre thinned lacquer and works great, lays down very nicely. I forget how much it was but it's cheap. Its an actual automotive clear so I wouldnt be concerned about yellowing, although i havent been using it long enough to knowbfor certain. I found it a O'reilly's

BVC500
03-05-2015, 11:05 AM
The composition is different, and I've read that it either you use it shortly after TS color coats or wait like 2 weeks till they have completely cured, or the paint finish will be altered.

Either way, I wouldn't know, I'm having a hard time getting Tamiya Spray cans anyway.

Take care

Never ever had a problem waiting 15 minutes, two weeks or months later, and I've been using it for years. The TS clear is designed to be used with their TS undercoats.

MPWR
03-05-2015, 04:32 PM
The composition is different, and I've read that it either you use it shortly after TS color coats or wait like 2 weeks till they have completely cured, or the paint finish will be altered.

Don't know where you heard this, but it was not Tamiya lacquers that you heard it about. :disappoin

What you describe above is applicable for applying enamels. Enamel paints are a completely different beast than lacquers, and they harden in a completely different way.

Enamels harden by curing- a chemical reaction with oxygen. It is a process that can take days (or weeks). If a curing layer of enamel is covered by a layer of paint, it is impossible then for that layer to complete its curing process, and it will never properly harden.

Lacquers on the other hand harden when their solvents evaporate (flash) out of solution. Instead of 'curing', they literally 'dry'. It's a good idea to let a newly applied layer of lacquer sit for an hour or so after spraying, to give the solvents the chance to flash out. But then you can go ahead and spray more.

Spraying lacquers can take all weekend (spray, let sit for an hour, sand lightly, spray, let sit, sand, spray...). With enamels on the other hand, if you're not done in a half hour, set it aside and come back to it next month. Some people do some beautiful things with enamels, but I would rather use finger paints.

Either way, TS clear works fine over TS color. Do not apply it thick and heavy- use many light mist coats to let that solvent properly evaporate out. If you apply lacquer clear heavy and wet, you are literally letting solvent sit in wet puddles on your paint- and that can sometimes melt what it is sprayed over.


Maybe you were reading a can of Duplicolor enamel?

bhop73
03-06-2015, 12:03 AM
I like Mr Color clear lacquer through my airbrush.

nascar49
03-06-2015, 02:30 AM
I use Dupli-Color Paint Shop. Its quart of pre thinned lacquer and works great, lays down very nicely. I forget how much it was but it's cheap. Its an actual automotive clear so I wouldnt be concerned about yellowing, although i havent been using it long enough to knowbfor certain. I found it a O'reilly's

I have been thinking about trying that stuff, do you have any pics you can post of how it looks ?

hirofkd
03-06-2015, 06:04 AM
For the U.S. modelers, I recommend Testors 1834 One-coat lacquer. It's much better than their old gloss lacquer coat, and also available at Hobby Lobby and Michaels (which means 40% off with their weekly coupon).

kostinha
03-06-2015, 02:02 PM
Krylon Crystal Clear 1301 or 1505UV, great finish, very fast drying time and very easy to achieve a great shine.

I do recomend it!

nascar49
03-06-2015, 05:25 PM
Krylon Crystal Clear 1301 or 1505UV, great finish, very fast drying time and very easy to achieve a great shine.

I do recomend it!

I have a can, it attacked Tamiya paint the one time I tried using it over Tamiya Paint, I have used it over other paints, and was not that happy with it.


Testors One Coat is good, that is my second go to clear, but my primary clear of choice is Mr Hobby Super Clear, love that stuff, and dont mind paying $15 a can for it, but I also dont use it over everything

Kjenjak
03-07-2015, 06:37 AM
Either way, TS clear works fine over TS color. Do not apply it thick and heavy- use many light mist coats to let that solvent properly evaporate out. My thoughts exyctly. I have always used TS13 gloss clear over other TS colours, in several thin layers, sometimes the next day, sometimes after months, and I never had any issues.

DHKG
03-07-2015, 07:28 AM
This 2 years I started using Mr Hobby's Super Clear UV cut, much better then Tamiya

http://www.google.com.tw/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&ved=0CAUQjBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fmfpilot.com%2Febaypics%2FGunzeB52 2Clear.jpg&ei=quz6VPnuJcjj8AXaloDABA&psig=AFQjCNHRCMgjw85sSOV_rTAUmiOQJ_SjFg&ust=1425817130717087

MaRiO FDZ
03-07-2015, 09:55 AM
Does Tamiya. tS-13 cover OK over decals??

MPWR
03-07-2015, 10:30 AM
Yes

-as long as you apply it properly.

Tamiya clear lacquer, like any clear lacquer, will dissolve whatever it is sprayed over if you put it on in wet, heavy coats. You don't want wet solvent sitting on your paint/decal job.

I use exclusively Tamiya and similar lacquers (my favorite is PPG, but it is not easy to get). I usually end up with five sessions of clearcoat when I'm done clearing a body, sprayed on in one or two light mist coats at a time. I leave an hour or two between sessions, and it's fine to leave it overnight or for several days also. I've never had trouble with clearcoat dissolving paint or decals this way.

But if you want something you can spray wet and heavy and be done with, choose another medium.

SmokeyR67
03-07-2015, 10:28 PM
All my models coated with 2K. I think this is best clear coat.

Unfortunately for those outside Europe it's no longer an option due to the inability to ship it.

John18d
03-08-2015, 12:35 AM
Unfortunately for those outside Europe it's no longer an option due to the inability to ship it.

Smokey - 2K is 2K they have Urethane 2K clear in every country that has automobiles - Try asking at an auto paint repair shop for small amounts of the Urethane clear and then the Catalyzer "Hardener" and the Reducer "thinner"

Hope this helps
John

MaRiO FDZ
03-08-2015, 11:38 AM
Yes

-as long as you apply it properly.

Tamiya clear lacquer, like any clear lacquer, will dissolve whatever it is sprayed over if you put it on in wet, heavy coats. You don't want wet solvent sitting on your paint/decal job.

I use exclusively Tamiya and similar lacquers (my favorite is PPG, but it is not easy to get). I usually end up with five sessions of clearcoat when I'm done clearing a body, sprayed on in one or two light mist coats at a time. I leave an hour or two between sessions, and it's fine to leave it overnight or for several days also. I've never had trouble with clearcoat dissolving paint or decals this way.

But if you want something you can spray wet and heavy and be done with, choose another medium.

Thanks for that. I normaly archieve my gloss with 2-3 coats of tamiya paint. When the car is single color, there's no problem. But When I painted a 94 Williams I realized the masked color dulls, so I sprayed future. Problem was that white was Slightly off and in a doomed build, it cracked. For my next project I (93 McLaren) used decals, but there's gotta be a better way.

This post nails what I was looking for. i already bought 2 cans, see how it works. Thanks again

Some_Kid
03-08-2015, 01:02 PM
Testors one coat is the best in my opinion. It dries very hard and isn't as hot as TS or Duplicolor. Also does well through the airbrush.

I do tend to get more orange peel with Testors but that's where compound comes in.

2k is also really good but also takes more work in my opinion. If you're using an acrylic base coat. 2k is your best bet as a clear coat. Just my 2 cents.

John18d
03-08-2015, 03:27 PM
Testors one coat is the best in my opinion. It dries very hard and isn't as hot as TS or Duplicolor. Also does well through the airbrush.

I do tend to get more orange peel with Testors but that's where compound comes in.

2k is also really good but also takes more work in my opinion. If you're using an acrylic base coat. 2k is your best bet as a clear coat. Just my 2 cents.

Kid - I've never tried Testors "one coat" Not sure what type of clear it is (acrylic-enamel-lacquer-etc) - but I've never had to spend time with compound and polishing when I use 2K.

When 2K is applied properly and let to sit and cure it comes out glass smooth
I've written many responses to the correct application of 2K in this forum and I have seen many responses by Steve Nobel on the topic of 2K - who, if you have seen his Suzuki Hayabusa, has beautiful 2K application on it.

John

MPWR
03-08-2015, 05:24 PM
But When I painted a 94 Williams I realized the masked color dulls, so I sprayed future.

Masking tape shouldn't be dulling paint under it.

To prevent it, leave the first color to outgas for a couple of days before you apply any tape to it. What likely happened is that the paint was still outgassing solvent when the tape was applied. With its evaporation route blocked, the solvent then didn't have anywhere to go so it resoftened the paint. The softened paint then took on the texture of the adhesive on the back of the tape.

Also, try (if at all possible) to minimize the amount of time that masking tape is applied to the paint. Apply the tape just before your first paint session, and after your done with the second color (and have given it an hour or two to harden), promptly remove the tape. Try to leave the tape on for a matter of hours, instead of multiple days or weeks.

Some tapes have more aggressive adhesives than others. I've had good experiences with 3M house painting tape and of course Tamiya tape- but I don't leave either in place any longer than I have to.


This post nails what I was looking for. i already bought 2 cans, see how it works. Thanks again

Happy to help.

Lacquer is a medium that rewards patience. Take your time with it and don't rush it.

The best way to apply TS is to decant it, add a bunch of Tamiya's lacquer thinner, and then spray it out of a decent gravity fed airbrush at a low working pressure. But if that's not practical for you-

-The second best way to spray it is from warmed cans. Leave the spray can in a container of hot water for 5 or 10 minutes before you apply it. Be careful to avoid getting the spray nozzle and the top of the can wet. Warming the can this way makes the paint behave better out of the can. It's easier to get nice even mist coats this way.

Mist coats will often leave a bit of a hazy surface when they dry. You can sand this down a bit in between coats (make sure to let the paint sit for an hour or two before you sand it), using very fine sandpaper. 1200, 1500, or 2000 can be gotten in the painting departments of auto parts stores. Be slow and gentile, better to sand too little than too much. When the last, final layer has been sprayed, do not sand it. Let the clearcoat harden for a week or so, and then just polish out that haze with a rubbing compound and some cotton flannel.

Some_Kid
03-08-2015, 06:14 PM
Kid - I've never tried Testors "one coat" Not sure what type of clear it is (acrylic-enamel-lacquer-etc) - but I've never had to spend time with compound and polishing when I use 2K.

When 2K is applied properly and let to sit and cure it comes out glass smooth
I've written many responses to the correct application of 2K in this forum and I have seen many responses by Steve Nobel on the topic of 2K - who, if you have seen his Suzuki Hayabusa, has beautiful 2K application on it.

John

I know very well that 2k is by far the strongest and most durable clear coat. But for practical purposes for modellers everywhere I think Testors One Coat gets the job done very well. Also no risk if you forget to clean out your airbrush.

Orange peel with 2k comes down to thinning ratios, just like most paints. I've used it before and I do like it a lot. However I do find that lacquer clears such as Testors or TS-13 conform to the body and surface details better and ultimately have a thinner appearance. Delivering a more realistic finish. It just comes down to ease of use for me. It's also not as dangerous as 2k.

You can deliver an everlasting finish with 2k. I do not doubt that. But the only time I'd consider using it is if my base coat is not lacquer.

Also if you tend to make mistakes or get dust in your paint. Lacquer is more forgiving and easier to fix. Just my opinion.

John18d
03-08-2015, 06:39 PM
Kid - you make some good points about 2K and Lacquers - I use both - TS13 - TS79 - the TS "matt" clears and then 2K when appropriate -
I agree with you that without the correct ventilation and mask - 2K should NOT be used
my point was, if you want a really glossy finish, then 2K cannot be beat
2K is a "clear plastic" urethane finish that does not need the time invested to polish - in fact 2K shouldn't need any polishing unless, as you stated, there is a flaw in the finish.
Lacquers are easier to fix flaws, because they are a "thinner" layer of clear, and do not harden as much as a 2K clear would
I spent many years painting restored cars and my race bikes in the 80's and 90's with PPG's Deltron system (DAU-DBU-DBC) paints and Delthane (2K) clears
I loved that stuff as it produced excellent results with little effort

John

MaRiO FDZ
03-09-2015, 03:32 AM
Masking tape shouldn't be dulling paint under it.

Happy to help.

Lacquer is a medium that rewards patience. Take your time with it and don't rush it.

The best way to apply TS is to decant it, add a bunch of Tamiya's lacquer thinner, and then spray it out of a decent gravity fed airbrush at a low working pressure. But if that's not practical for you-

-The second best way to spray it is from warmed cans. Leave the spray can in a container of hot water for 5 or 10 minutes before you apply it. Be careful to avoid getting the spray nozzle and the top of the can wet. Warming the can this way makes the paint behave better out of the can. It's easier to get nice even mist coats this way.

Mist coats will often leave a bit of a hazy surface when they dry. You can sand this down a bit in between coats (make sure to let the paint sit for an hour or two before you sand it), using very fine sandpaper. 1200, 1500, or 2000 can be gotten in the painting departments of auto parts stores. Be slow and gentile, better to sand too little than too much. When the last, final layer has been sprayed, do not sand it. Let the clearcoat harden for a week or so, and then just polish out that haze with a rubbing compound and some cotton flannel.

Thanks again. I alwaysre-heat and dip my cans for paint sessions. I still gota do some tests see how the coat (probably just one layer) will act on the decals. I MAY DECANT buT. I'm leaning towards the single heated layer.

Thanks again

Take care

nascar49
03-09-2015, 07:16 PM
Kid - I've never tried Testors "one coat" Not sure what type of clear it is (acrylic-enamel-lacquer-etc) - but I've never had to spend time with compound and polishing when I use 2K.

When 2K is applied properly and let to sit and cure it comes out glass smooth
I've written many responses to the correct application of 2K in this forum and I have seen many responses by Steve Nobel on the topic of 2K - who, if you have seen his Suzuki Hayabusa, has beautiful 2K application on it.

John

Its lacquer based

chato de shamrock
03-10-2015, 01:27 AM
I only spray clear through spray can and am still hesitant to use it any other way even though now i have an airbrush and been painting with it more then I have cans or brushes. If Mr. Hobby is available I'll stock up on cans and use that. If shipments are backed up for whatever reason I'll either use Testors One Coat Lacquer or Tamiya. Testors is my preference between the two. I do have mixed feelings about Tamiya only because of the number of comments posted on here about it damaging decals. Although, i've never had problems with either brand mentioned on my comment and decals. I always spray two to three mist coats and let each coat dry at least half hour before I apply a following coat. Afterwards I'll lay it on thicker. I have yet to damage any decals even with Tamiya cans.

cjsbosox
03-10-2015, 01:45 PM
I switched to 2K after I noticed Tamiya TS clear, or any other laquer clear I tried, lose sheen after a while. I will never go back

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