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Polishing Compounds: Tamiya Vs. Finisher's


Hemi Killer
02-20-2014, 04:36 PM
I have a bunch of stuff I want to order from Hobby Search. They don't have Tamiya compounds but I see they have Finisher's. I'd prefer to just order everything from one place. Does anyone have experience with this brand?

gluebomb
02-20-2014, 05:43 PM
don't get fooled by thinking you need a "hobby name brand" polish. go to your local auto parts store and buy some there. for the same price as a tiny tube of tamiya you will have years and years worth of product

RonCla
02-20-2014, 06:37 PM
don't get fooled by thinking you need a "hobby name brand" polish. go to your local auto parts store and buy some there. for the same price as a tiny tube of tamiya you will have years and years worth of product

X2 on that. I use both Turtle and Meguiars products.

I've found the scratch and swirl removers give a better finish than the Tamiya compounds

eyckles
02-20-2014, 07:38 PM
I have used Finishers compounds a couple of times. They are way better than Tamiya, but they dry out very quickly if you don't screw on the caps right. They give a better finish then Tamiya. I think they are automotive compounds, so it's better to go to an automotive parts store and buy them there. I hope this helps.

Best regards,
Lesley

MPWR
02-20-2014, 08:58 PM
Alright, those of you who use automotive compounds-

What do you use/recommend?

I like mcguire's scratchx as a replacement for Tamiya medium- but I'm looking for something hat will work well in place of Tamiya's coarse compound. Anyone have a favorite?

Hemi Killer
02-20-2014, 09:29 PM
I have been using Scratch X for a while and it seems to do pretty good, but it seems like there is more potential there.

The white cream that comes with the Micromesh kit is the best I have used so far. What automotive compound would be similar to that fine of a finish?

cjsbosox
02-20-2014, 09:54 PM
I started using this on my real cars and loved it. So of course I tried it on my kits once I started using 2k clear and love it even more. I also use pieces from my Lake County orange pad instead of a rag.

http://www.autogeek.net/menzerna-intro-kit.html

Hemi Killer
02-21-2014, 12:19 AM
I have some Menzerna sealant.

I use Poor Boys compounds on my truck, but they seem a little gritty and loose for a small model. Like it's made specifically for a rotary machine.

JimboCO
02-21-2014, 11:27 AM
I haven't used automotive polishes on my models but can comment that the Finishers system is excellent. I like Tamiya too but have found the Finishers to be better in really getting a nice polish. Finishers paints and thinners are excellent too.

CrateCruncher
02-21-2014, 12:42 PM
I've used 3M Finesse-It II for 20 years which is how long a quart will probably last. The cutting agent is aluminum oxide which is just soft enough to "crumble" on a microscopic level into finer pieces as you work it over the paint. It changes to finer and finer grain until it turns into no cut at all as a dazzling mirror shine emerges. It's fool-proof and fun to use.

http://www.amazon.com/FINISHING-MATERIAL-FINESSE-IT-II-QUART/dp/B005EB6P40/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1393003409&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=3m+finesse+it+ii

http://www.ebay.com/itm/3m-Finesse-it-05928-/271405586185

Professional Auto Restorers have been using the stuff for decades. There are smaller retail bottles available (16 oz) but they invariably say machine glaze because doing a 1/1 auto by hand would wear you out!

For models, I only recommend using it as a hand polish after micromesh abrasives have leveled the paint. I use a new cotton ball dampened slightly with water. That way I can watch how much paint is being removed with the polish. When I'm polishing clear coat I keep an eye on the cotton to ensure I haven't polished through to the color. I also use it to polish clear parts like windshields. The red Ferrari in my signature had horrible clear parts. That rear glass was shined up with Finesse-It.

Have fun.

ffreak
02-21-2014, 03:01 PM
I like to use Novus # 1 & #2 and Tamiya also. But the Tamiya finish tube just puts an amazing shine to my clear coats no matter which compound I use for the polishing.

Hemi Killer
02-21-2014, 06:16 PM
Lots of good recommendations, thank you everyone.

MPWR
02-21-2014, 09:19 PM
I've used 3M Finesse-It II for 20 years which is how long a quart will probably last. The cutting agent is aluminum oxide which is just soft enough to "crumble" on a microscopic level into finer pieces as you work it over the paint.

Not to be a jerk, but I don't think this is actually what is happening. Aluminum oxide is one of the hardest substances known (about 9 on the Mohs scale)- few other substances are as hard or harder. Aluminum oxide will crumble when crushed by substances of comparable hardnesses- but automotive paint is nowhere near hard enough to break it down.

It's not particularly significant for modeling, but the hardness of aluminum oxide is very relevant in metalworking. It and silicon carbide are the two most common industrial abrasives. A layer of aluminum oxide is also created as a protective coating on aluminum when it is anodized.

Hemi Killer
02-21-2014, 09:37 PM
I use aluminum oxide daily to hone granite and marble, which contains quartz (very hard 7 on the mohs scale). The aluminum oxide does not break down, it's extremely hard. However when using silicone carbide sandpaper I can work a lower grit (120) until it pulverizes itself into basically a 1000-ish grit to create a polish.

I noticed that but didn't think it was a big deal in this context

CrateCruncher
02-21-2014, 11:15 PM
Not to be a jerk, but I don't think this is actually what is happening. Aluminum oxide is one of the hardest substances known (about 9 on the Mohs scale)- few other substances are as hard or harder. Aluminum oxide will crumble when crushed by substances of comparable hardnesses- but automotive paint is nowhere near hard enough to break it down.

It's not particularly significant for modeling, but the hardness of aluminum oxide is very relevant in metalworking. It and silicon carbide are the two most common industrial abrasives. A layer of aluminum oxide is also created as a protective coating on aluminum when it is anodized.

I should have explained it more precisely. The aluminum oxide are extremely fine but held together in a fragile petroleum binder. As the compound is worked the binder breaks down, not the aluminum oxide molecules.

I guess it's harder to explain than I thought. Sorry about that.

Porsnatic
02-21-2014, 11:17 PM
Guys...it's between Tamiya and Finisher's...I had used both and...Finisher's for a quarter of a mile...It's a much more complete system, although I combine them for my personal use. After Tamiya 1500 or 2000 sandpaper, use the Finisher's Medium, then the Tamiya Fine Compound, The treatment wax as a final compound...and the Tamiya wax for final gloss...

klinad
02-22-2014, 02:47 PM
from my expierence, FINSHERS is more suitable for hard clear coats like 2k cear or Finishers GP1,GP2. The material is harder than TAMIYA. If you use normal clear like 1k clear, finisher's also works well but just be carefull it wont polish out the coat at edges. I would recommand you to use finisher's finish compound(the one with blue cap) instead of tamiya finish cause finisher's has wax in it making the surface more shinny.

kopek
02-22-2014, 10:20 PM
Crate Cruncher.
I know what you mean about it breaking down with use, I use a bit of spit to help in this!

There is Finesse it and Hand Glaze, a brown liquid polish from 3M, do you know which is the finer grade? Mine are also 20 years old and unreadable instructions.

Ta if you know.
JohnK

klutz_100
03-04-2014, 03:05 PM
I've used 3M Finesse-It II for 20 years which is how long a quart will probably last.

Have fun.
Based on your reco, I have just bought 1 litre of Finesse-it and 1 litre of Hand Glaze.

I guess I will either very happy for the next 20 years… or not :lol: ;)

BTW on the aluminum question. I guess you are all aware of the chrome cleaning/polishing with aluminum foil "trick"?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDo41UPfb8c

(I am NOT suggesting to polish model cars with foil though! :evillol: )

kopek
03-04-2014, 09:14 PM
I was prompted to look up Hand Glaze by the above. Apparently it is a feed/moisturiser for use on 'New Paint', sounds ideal for our situation, to be finished with Finesse It.

Recommend a test on pure white paint though. Can take on a bit of the brown pigment. Though it does polish out.

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