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Bummer!


eternazr4
01-03-2013, 03:49 PM
At the moment I'm buidling Tamiya's Toyota 86 and Subaru BRZ. I airbrushed Tamiya's liquid surface primer (the grey colour) then lightly sanded it before applying zero paints 'Phantom Black' which is one of the official colours for the 86/BRZ.

After applying 4 thin coats, waiting 5 mins in between each coat, this happened.. F@%K!!

http://imageshack.us/a/img15/8697/52195790.jpg

http://imageshack.us/a/img43/2339/29795483.jpg

http://imageshack.us/a/img824/5478/81841781.jpg

The paint seems to have attacked the primer, causing an uneven and rough textured finish in certain places. I have since stripped the paint in Brake fluid. The paint definatley seems to have melted the primer, as there are still light tracings of the melted paint left on the body, in the same areas as when painted in the pics above. The area also still has the rough texture. The Subaru BRZ however turned out fine, only difference was using Tamiya's white liquid surface primer. This time round I will try applying a few more coats of the grey surface primer, as the previous priming was on the thin side.

sjelic
01-03-2013, 05:22 PM
what thinner did you use for primer and which one for Zero, if you can get spray primer from tamiya it is the best solution, if not, always use same thinner (base) for primer and paint (laquer in this case) even thou I am not sure for tamy liquid primer is it acrylic based or not, if yes, try to get Gunze liquid primer, it is laquer based.

RonCla
01-03-2013, 05:26 PM
Thats a bad case of solvent etching. Try laying the Zero paint down in lighter coats with more drying time between each coat which will allow the solvent to evaporate out.

Zero paints are real automotive paints and thus have a ' Hot ' solvent

eternazr4
01-03-2013, 05:55 PM
what thinner did you use for primer and which one for Zero, if you can get spray primer from tamiya it is the best solution, if not, always use same thinner (base) for primer and paint (laquer in this case) even thou I am not sure for tamy liquid primer is it acrylic based or not, if yes, try to get Gunze liquid primer, it is laquer based.

Tamiya's liquid surface primer is lacquer based, it was thinned using Tamiya's lacquer thinner. The Zero paints paint wasn't thinned at all, as it was pre-thinned and thin enough for my airbrush.

eternazr4
01-03-2013, 05:56 PM
Thats a bad case of solvent etching. Try laying the Zero paint down in lighter coats with more drying time between each coat which will allow the solvent to evaporate out.

Zero paints are real automotive paints and thus have a ' Hot ' solvent

Thanks! yeah I will wait longer between coats.

ZoomZoomMX-5
01-03-2013, 06:53 PM
Hobby lacquers, like Tamiya and Gunze primers, are in no way guaranteed to protect the plastic from automotive-grade lacquers.

You need to use automotive grade primer, and/or primer-sealer. You could sand this surface smooth, but you must use a sealer or even mild hobby lacquers will etch the plastic again now that it is damaged.

Had you used Tamiya or Gunze paint (color) over the Tamiya primer, this would not have happened. I would assume Zero makes a suitable primer for their paints to avoid this kind of damage.

Lownslow
01-03-2013, 11:02 PM
only hobby grade paint that has kept auto grade lacquer from attacking plastic is Vallejo primers.

eternazr4
01-04-2013, 12:08 AM
Interesting... The Subaru BRZ i've just finished clear coating (with zero paints 2k clear) came out really nice. I airbrushed Tamiya's Liquid surface primer (white) and Zero paints WR blue for base coat. I think I will just need to apply more layers of liquid surface primer this time around for the 86. The primer coat on the BRZ was much thicker, based on how much sanding was required to reveal the raw plastic again.

I think once I get the knack for airburshing with Zero paints, there will be no turning back to the Tamiya TS range.

icon_modeler
01-04-2013, 01:21 AM
So tell me something. Why do people insist on mixing paint manufactures and then act surprised when something doesn't work out. You can get primer surfacer from Zero Paints. Zero also makes a sealer that you probably should have used over the Tamiya primer before you shot the Zero color. But why use the Tamiya at all when Zero makes everything you need and it is all compatable to each other??? You should consider yourself lucky that the BRZ came out at all. Dont let it take another round of sanding a striping of another model before you realize that maybe you should not be using these products together.

:2cents::2cents::2cents:

eternazr4
01-04-2013, 03:14 PM
So tell me something. Why do people insist on mixing paint manufactures and then act surprised when something doesn't work out. You can get primer surfacer from Zero Paints. Zero also makes a sealer that you probably should have used over the Tamiya primer before you shot the Zero color. But why use the Tamiya at all when Zero makes everything you need and it is all compatable to each other??? You should consider yourself lucky that the BRZ came out at all. Dont let it take another round of sanding a striping of another model before you realize that maybe you should not be using these products together.

:2cents::2cents::2cents:

Thanks for your input.

Zero paints are not easily available in NZ, they have to be imported from the UK.

The Zero paints website also says that the base coat has been tested to be safe over Tamiya primers.

sjelic
01-04-2013, 04:34 PM
they sure are over spray can primers, I use that combo only and it works perfect, never ever have I had any problems, but, it is hard to get spray cans these days....

icon_modeler
01-04-2013, 06:11 PM
Thanks for your input.

Zero paints are not easily available in NZ, they have to be imported from the UK.

The Zero paints website also says that the base coat has been tested to be safe over Tamiya primers.

Zero Paint has to be imported everywhere except England. There is only one place that I know of to get it and that is Hiroboy so everyone is in the same boat who wants to use it. I was just wondering why if you had to order the paint you did not order the other products that are intended to be used with it at the same time.

Also, if I understand correctly the Tamiya primer you used is the Liquid primer/surfacer that comes in a bottle, correct, not a spray can?? If so I think that the stuff that comes in a bottle is relatively new from Tamiya (I just recently found out about it) so I doubt that it would be included in the Zero Paint disclaimer, but I could be wrong about that.

I do not intend to beat you up over this but it is not the first time I've seen someone use mix matched paints and then have trouble and wonder why. I just wonder why people do it in the first place. As general practic when I painted 1/1 cars years ago we never mix matched the paints we used on a car because of the compatability issues. With model paints I would think this is even more critical becuase you never really know what's in the bottle (or can). Tamiya's Lacquer is completely differnt to Model Master Lacquer or what each company calls Lacquer. On top of that at least in the US Tamiya reformulates many of it paints every few years to conform to new EPA standards. So what did they change?? Does anyone really know?? The only way to be sure would be to do a test each and every time you get ready to mix match your paint. Sure seems easier to use all the same brand then to have to test everything each time you get a new bottle of something.

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