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Polish in panel lines, *Mr Hobby Polishing Pretreatment Waterproof cloth


Averion
06-07-2012, 09:29 PM
Hi guys,

Have got 2 questions and a product enquiry here.

Firstly, a long time problem is that white stain from tamiya polish getting stuck
in the panel lines. I had tried to use wet cotton swabs to remove it. Upon application, it does seem like its removed, because it's wet and it blends into the body color, however upon drying, the white stain comes back. I tried using a harder object like a toothpick or a needle, but the risk of scratching the body work or chipping the paint is there. You guys have any cure for that?

Next, I'm new to PE parts, tried sanding, the priming then painting them. However the paint does not seems to adhere, it gets scratched out pretty easily. Any cure for that? Metal primer, does it work? Do you guys brush it on or spray it?

Lastly, there's this product I'm not too sure of how to use. Mr Hobby *Polishing Pretreatment Waterproof cloth. Any of you guys have any experience with those?

Thanks for all the help!
Cheers,
Wilson

MidMazar
06-07-2012, 11:06 PM
For the residue in the panel lines a toothpick does work well for me. Although you have to be careful and have a brand new pick (really good,small point). You might have to use a couple for an entire body. I would avoid anything sharp. If thats too scary the other method that works great for me and faster is to use an old toothbrush underwater and scrub gently. Once done and dried final touch of wax.

For the pe parts there are a few things you should try. First definitly use metal primer as it will adhere to the pe a lot better than regular primer. Tamiyas is really good although its hard to tell how good of a coat you have done because its clear. :lol: I also sand the pe parts to be primed and painted because that helps even more. Spraying would be a better choice. And lastly, try to avoid moving, touching the pe as much as you can.

The last question i'm not sure about. Are they polishing cloths? Sandpaper?

Good luck.

Entau
06-08-2012, 12:37 AM
i use old tooth brush and little bit of soap, for pe, metal primer does help but still the paint will chip off if you are not very careful :icon16:

Dadimix
06-08-2012, 08:48 AM
try with a baby's tooth brush, i use this and no problems at all. you can rub the panel lines and no scratch

MerlinPro
06-08-2012, 04:48 PM
You can avoid the issue completely by NOT waxing the paint. :nono:
After using grades of polishing cloths to your final gloss, use a 1:1 car 'detailer' such as Mother's Spray Detailer and microfiber cloths to lightly buff it.
It's what 1:1 show cars use.

Averion
06-11-2012, 12:55 AM
Thanks for all the advices, will try them.

Btw MerlinPro, you mentioned polishing cloths, and different grades, do you happen to mean that they could replace the normal cloth and polishing compound?

Thanks. =)

MerlinPro
06-11-2012, 11:25 AM
Thanks for all the advices, will try them.

Btw MerlinPro, you mentioned polishing cloths, and different grades, do you happen to mean that they could replace the normal cloth and polishing compound?

Thanks. =)
Yes, these are abrasive polishing cloths which come in kits of various grits. Starting with the coarsest to the finest (used wet) gives you glass smooth finishes on paint and clear windows.
Here's one but there are others if you search;
http://www.ehobbies.com/dtm9000.html

ZoomZoomMX-5
06-11-2012, 12:18 PM
You can avoid the issue completely by NOT waxing the paint. :nono:
After using grades of polishing cloths to your final gloss, use a 1:1 car 'detailer' such as Mother's Spray Detailer and microfiber cloths to lightly buff it.
It's what 1:1 show cars use.

I think you may misunderstand the basic question, and are misleading the original poster.

I challenge anyone to paint a body and polish it out only with polishing cloths (Micromesh, which is shown above in reference to Detail Master polishing cloths, Micromesh is the name of the company that makes it, and it is available from sources outside the model hobby) all the way through 12K grit, and only buff it to a high gloss with a microfiber cloth and spray detailer.

That's just not how it works, at least if you want a decent level of gloss, because it skips a complete step in-between (you'd be better off not to use any wetsanding paper or Micromesh if all you are going to do is apply a liquid detailer). Go back to the original question; the white residue/buildup is not wax, it is compound (Tamiya) which comes in coarse, fine, and finish. All grades leave behind a white residue (which I remove w/a toothpick or fine toothbrush, while rinsing the body prior to final assembly). No "wax" involved whatsoever up to that point. 1:1 car painters/detailers all use liquid polishing compounds in between sanding/polishing media and final liquid "detailing". Proper leveling and polishing a paint job involves wetsanding (w/automotive wet or dry sandpapers, or better for models-Micromesh polishing cloths up to 12,000 grit), use of compound, then a final detailer. Tamiya wax is a thick, clear liquid that leaves behind no white/cloudy residue, and is applied w/a special non-woven cloth; eyeglass cleaning cloths are a good idea for that final detail. Compared to Meguiars or Mothers liquid detailers, it's a bit better on a model, and a little goes a long way, my bottle has lasted many, many years. As good as it is, it cannot and will not replace the compound stage of paint detailing.

ZoomZoomMX-5
06-11-2012, 12:46 PM
Hi guys,

Have got 2 questions and a product enquiry here.

Firstly, a long time problem is that white stain from tamiya polish getting stuck
in the panel lines. I had tried to use wet cotton swabs to remove it. Upon application, it does seem like its removed, because it's wet and it blends into the body color, however upon drying, the white stain comes back. I tried using a harder object like a toothpick or a needle, but the risk of scratching the body work or chipping the paint is there. You guys have any cure for that?

Next, I'm new to PE parts, tried sanding, the priming then painting them. However the paint does not seems to adhere, it gets scratched out pretty easily. Any cure for that? Metal primer, does it work? Do you guys brush it on or spray it?

Lastly, there's this product I'm not too sure of how to use. Mr Hobby *Polishing Pretreatment Waterproof cloth. Any of you guys have any experience with those?

Thanks for all the help!
Cheers,
Wilson

I use a toothpick and/or a small, soft scrub brush to remove the compound residue. It's tough sometimes, even vs. some of the small, pointed hobby cotton swabs.

As for P/E primer, as mentioned above, Tamiya's is excellent. In fact, it's nearly a miracle product because it goes on clear and in what seems to be an impossibly thin and smooth coat. I'm sure if Mr. Hobby makes the same thing it is likely equivalent to Tamiya.

I don't know much about the Mr. Hobby polishing/pretreatment cloths, but it sounds like the same basic thing as Micromesh cloths, with more limited grits (2400, 4000, 6000, 8000). Micromesh was primarily made for polishing windshields, and is repackaged for hobby use by any number of places, like Detail Master. Micromesh is made in 1500, 1800, 2400, 3200, 3600, 4/6/8/12,000 grits (most hobby packs skip the 1500 & 3200 grits, and sometimes the 12000 grit). I get separate, larger replacement sheets locally at Rockler, a woodworking supply store that has locations throughout the US. I can get the sheets I use most frequently, and I cut them into smaller pieces. More economical than having to buy an entire set from 1800-12000 grit when the 2400, 3200, 3600, and 4,000 that get the lion's share of work.

Averion
06-15-2012, 03:04 AM
Hmm, guys I dun want my simple enquiry to get heated up so relax ya?

Anyways, doesn't really matter if I get misled or not. The fun of modelling is in its process, and sometimes there may be different methods to the same end. Its interesting as I had modelled for a good 7-9 years now and have not gotten to know about polishing cloths. I shall purchase both 2400/4000 and 6000/8000 to try it out. However I'm not too sure if I would come to need the 12000grid cloth.

I'm really curious as to how much grid rating the tamiya compounds really are, coarse fine and finish.

Micromesh cloths are not readily available in my country, as modelling is a very rare hobby here.

As for the 1:1 detailer, I had used it before and it almost screwed up my mom's paint job. Well, that's another story. I'm sure it will work well, but it depends on how much work went into your gloss coat. To be honest, I'm still pretty novice in this area. Hoping that experimenting with different products might just provide me with the "photoshop" shine.

Thanks guys for all your invaluable advices.

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