Applying sealant and wax to a new paint job


dsorboen
05-24-2012, 08:50 PM
Can anyone explain why you shouldn't apply sealant and wax to a new paint job? I was told to wait 6 months. Is that the normal timeframe?
I was hoping to have my vehicle in a showing this summer and I wanted to make it really POP.

jayrerickson
05-27-2012, 12:33 PM
Can anyone explain why you shouldn't apply sealant and wax to a new paint job? I was told to wait 6 months. Is that the normal timeframe?
I was hoping to have my vehicle in a showing this summer and I wanted to make it really POP.

Its to make sure every thing is dry before you put wax on and seal it up. As for me, I use a buffer on new paint. Use a polish with the buffer to bring that shine out and it dries the paint better. Use a real buffer that will create heat. Heat is how you get that show finish. The buffer heats the clear coat just to its melting point. The clear coat then lays flatter and gives you that shine. At the same time it dries the new paint better. Thats how you get scratches out. The buffer heats the clear to the point where it is just about to burn melt and pushes clear into the scratch. Go here http://www.elite-custom-cars.com A lot of info on automotive paint with the supply's you need.

BIG E CUSTOMS
05-27-2012, 04:27 PM
You do have to wait before you wax new paint. If your clear is not fully cured wax can cause the clear to cloud. Fast wax is the only wax you can use right away on fresh paint. It is designed for this purpose. Talk to your jobber.

dsorboen
05-27-2012, 08:14 PM
Thanks for everyones help.

noman75
05-30-2012, 02:21 AM
worth comment. I think that you must write much more on this topic, it may well not be a taboo subject but typically folks are not sufficient to speak on such topics. To the next. Cheers

jayrerickson
05-30-2012, 03:06 AM
You do have to wait before you wax new paint. If your clear is not fully cured wax can cause the clear to cloud. Fast wax is the only wax you can use right away on fresh paint. It is designed for this purpose. Talk to your jobber.

This is true but if you use a buffer with a polish or an extra fine compound you could wax it right after. The heat from the buffer cured the clear and gave it a better shine. Now you put wax on to protect it. Theres a lot of heat that comes from the buffer. Burn the paint right off if your not careful.

shadows
06-04-2012, 04:37 PM
This is true but if you use a buffer with a polish or an extra fine compound you could wax it right after. The heat from the buffer cured the clear and gave it a better shine. Now you put wax on to protect it. Theres a lot of heat that comes from the buffer. Burn the paint right off if your not careful.

you never sanded down a vehicle, fixed a few spots, & painted it- when a customer was paying $700.00- $2,500.00 for quality and finish- did you

pontiacman428
06-06-2012, 10:22 PM
You do have to wait before you wax new paint. If your clear is not fully cured wax can cause the clear to cloud. Fast wax is the only wax you can use right away on fresh paint. It is designed for this purpose. Talk to your jobber.




This is pretty much on the mark. Let me add I've always used "butter wax" which is a very light wax & smooth like butter with no carnauba added which allows it to wear off in a couple of weeks or so. This is good for the uncured urethane paints which takes 30-90 days to fully cure depending on the UV sun exposure. But as suggested talk to an autobody supply store.

Berldn
06-07-2012, 06:11 AM
You do have to wait before you wax new paint.
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yeah. but someone ask what is the time frame. it is obvious to wait after the new paint..




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pontiacman428
06-07-2012, 05:34 PM
yeah. but someone ask what is the time frame. it is obvious to wait after the new paint..




For lacquer 7 days should give it plenty of time to harden but if you know how to check it then it could be as little as 3-4 days.

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