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Changing brake fluid in 07 Honda Accord question


Pawl
01-22-2012, 04:19 AM
Can anyone ballpark a guess on how much fluid it will take to get all the dirty fluid out. I am your typical backyard mechanic who does it on the driveway. I don't have a large selection of tools to do things the way a professional mechanic would. But I have been working on my families cars for years, I also know it has been done when I do it and save a little coin in the process. In the past I have just loosened the bleeder and pushed the pedal a few times making sure the master cylinder stays full. I just keep watching what comes out until it looks cleaner than it was. I probably do each wheel about 3 times and call it a day. Sound about right guys?

somick
01-23-2012, 12:35 PM
Can anyone ballpark a guess on how much fluid it will take to get all the dirty fluid out. I am your typical backyard mechanic who does it on the driveway. I don't have a large selection of tools to do things the way a professional mechanic would. But I have been working on my families cars for years, I also know it has been done when I do it and save a little coin in the process. In the past I have just loosened the bleeder and pushed the pedal a few times making sure the master cylinder stays full. I just keep watching what comes out until it looks cleaner than it was. I probably do each wheel about 3 times and call it a day. Sound about right guys?You mean you close the bleeder screw and then let the pedal go? You do not want to suck the air in!

I usually buy a large bottle in Wallmart. It cost $4.77 if I remember it right. After I am done I have about half of the container left.

Sam

Pawl
01-23-2012, 01:55 PM
I bought one of those do it yourself self bleeder kits with a couple of different size hoses to attach to the bleeder connection. The other end of the hose is immersed in the bottom of the cup like container the kit supplies. The cup is about the size of a dixie cup with a hose connection on top of the cap of the dixie like cup container. So after I start the first push on the brake pedal the dirty fluid is filling the cup and doesn't allow air back into the system. It works for me every time with no resulting soft pedal.

somick
01-24-2012, 01:15 PM
I bought one of those do it yourself self bleeder kits with a couple of different size hoses to attach to the bleeder connection. The other end of the hose is immersed in the bottom of the cup like container the kit supplies. The cup is about the size of a dixie cup with a hose connection on top of the cap of the dixie like cup container. So after I start the first push on the brake pedal the dirty fluid is filling the cup and doesn't allow air back into the system. It works for me every time with no resulting soft pedal.Wow!

I will have a closer look at those kits. I use the Mighty Vac pump, but my hands getting weak and I have been having lots of problems lately.

Sam

ricebike
01-24-2012, 08:50 PM
the OP is talking about something like this:

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/9094101_lg.jpg

jgr7
01-26-2012, 10:14 AM
You didn't mention it but you should suck out all the old fluid from the reservoir and put new in before you start the process.

Pawl
01-26-2012, 11:32 AM
I was curious about the Mighty Vac pump and the local auto parts guy actually sold them so I purchased one. I read the directions and could not get the 2 inches of fluid out it recommends but I did notice it removed all the air. It was a little deceiving. I was waiting for a whole bunch of air to come out but there wasn't really that much. I test drove it and there is no soft pedal.
I have only rebuilt the front calipers and by disconnecting the brake lines to the calipers it allowed the existing fluid to run completely out which had the normal amount of dirt in the old fluid. I left the two front brake lines disconnected and they drained like that for a couple of days so I think that helped to remove most of the dirty fluid. Even though I did not take the rear calipers apart is there air in those lines since the reservoir was empty?
I think I will bleed them this morning and see what happens. It seems logical that there would be air in all of the lines after the reservoir became empty. There is 48,000 miles on this car.

Scrapper
01-26-2012, 12:49 PM
I was curious about the Mighty Vac pump and the local auto parts guy actually sold them so I purchased one. I read the directions and could not get the 2 inches of fluid out it recommends but I did notice it removed all the air. It was a little deceiving. I was waiting for a whole bunch of air to come out but there wasn't really that much. I test drove it and there is no soft pedal.
I have only rebuilt the front calipers and by disconnecting the brake lines to the calipers it allowed the existing fluid to run completely out which had the normal amount of dirt in the old fluid. I left the two front brake lines disconnected and they drained like that for a couple of days so I think that helped to remove most of the dirty fluid. Even though I did not take the rear calipers apart is there air in those lines since the reservoir was empty?
I think I will bleed them this morning and see what happens. It seems logical that there would be air in all of the lines after the reservoir became empty. There is 48,000 miles on this car.

yes your on right track about bleeding all 4 now to get all the air out.

good luck...

Pawl
01-27-2012, 12:27 PM
I bled the rears after your suggestion and there wasn't any air in them. It kind of makes sense that there would not be because I did not diconnnect those brakes lines when I was working on the fronts. But it is always better to be safe than sorry. Thanks

DeltaP
01-27-2012, 06:42 PM
Sucking the fluid out of the master cyl and refilling it before you start isnt a bad idea. You can reuse that fluid further on here. Then I use a short lenght of vaccuum tubing and slip it over the bleeder screw. I put a loop in it and the other end goes down into a mayonaise jar with a hole punched in the lid big enough to hold it snugly in place. Fill the jar with a coupla inches of fluid and push the tubing just far enough to be submerged but not to the bottom of the jar. Then, start at the wheel furthest away from the master cyl,(usually the right rear wheel), crack the bleeder and pump the pedal a few,(3), times. Go to the left rear,repeat, on to the right front and then to the left front wheel making sure the master never gets too low on fluid. The air bubbles rises to the top and the dirt settles to the bottom of the jar. The front calipers will usually gravity bleed themselves if you let them. No need to disconnect lines and letting them drain.That only makes the bleeding task longer and uses alot more fluid for not much gain as most residue collects in the cylinders and calipers. Total cost: an empty jar, a coupla feet of vaccuum tubing and the brake fluid. Now I have more sophisticated equipment at the shop but this rig works just fine.

Scrapper
01-28-2012, 11:40 AM
I bled the rears after your suggestion and there wasn't any air in them. It kind of makes sense that there would not be because I did not diconnnect those brakes lines when I was working on the fronts. But it is always better to be safe than sorry. Thanks

your right better safe then sorry so you got good pedal now huh and no air?

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