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rate manufacturers you like/hate?


Constantino
01-05-2012, 10:29 PM
Ive only ever built revell (whatever the sell in micheals when I was young) and tamiya.

As I remember it, the revell ussually fit poorly, paint colors left room for intepretation, fitment was meh, so on.

Tamiya in comparison has been great for me, instructions are clear, I love that they give you exact paint colors, nice PE stuff and all that jazz.

I have never done any other brands though, and I might like to...

Perhaps people could rate the kit makers that they have experience with as far as the quality out of the box on average?

BVC500
01-05-2012, 10:43 PM
All (Revell, Fujimi, Tamiya and Aoshima) have improved recently. Still, they have occasional misses. I'd rank Revell as most improved.

drunken monkey
01-05-2012, 10:46 PM
there are no good/bad kit manufacturers; only good/bad kits.

RonCla
01-06-2012, 05:17 AM
there are no good/bad kit manufacturers; only good/bad kits.

Got to agree with that.

auw12
01-06-2012, 06:46 AM
I hate Fujimi, and Tamiya, and Revell...

lovegt40
01-06-2012, 07:14 AM
the ones starting with plasticard a4 sheets...

icon_modeler
01-06-2012, 08:38 AM
I hate Fujimi, and Tamiya, and Revell...

Sorry to say but you must not be much of a modeler if you hate Tamiya, they almost assemble themselves!!!


There are modelers and there are assemblers, which are you?? This is a general question that anyone who buys a model kit must ask themselves......

ZoomZoomMX-5
01-06-2012, 08:53 AM
Novice builders tend to like Tamiya more than Revell, in general, because the kits are engineered better.

You can't really make blanket statements for any manufacturer though, because they all have their stars, and all have a few dogs. If you aren't old enough to remember some of the kits that were issued prior to say 1990, they were generally not up to the standards of today, and Japanese kits from the 70's and early 80's were generally very toylike.

It's better if you need input to ask about a particular kit. With more building experience, kits that might have been frustrating in the past become better subjects to build, as you may instinctively start picking up what to look out for and use your modeling skills to get past particular problem areas.

drunken monkey
01-06-2012, 11:57 AM
Sorry to say but you must not be much of a modeler if you hate Tamiya, they almost assemble themselves!!!


There are modelers and there are assemblers, which are you?? This is a general question that anyone who buys a model kit must ask themselves......


what a contradictory pair of statements.
so by your rationale, if tamiya kits almost assemble themselves, surely you are just an assembler if you like them?

leafs004
01-06-2012, 12:35 PM
Tamiya, Hasegawa, and Fujimi are usually pretty good. There's an occasional model they rushed to production, but some of the later ones are excellent. Tamiya did a really good job with the LFA.

Don't care much for Monogram or Arii.

I've come to like Revell a lot more lately as they have upped their game, but I still don't like how the chassis comes separate from the wheelwells and suspension because you have to be very careful to make sure everything is aligned properly.

ZTony8
01-06-2012, 04:17 PM
I've always enjoyed building Tamiya kits.The parts engineering for fit is first class.Seems like the painting is the most involved process with Tamiya kits.They've made me realize how much work there is in making a domestic(AMT,MPC,Revell, Monogram)kit look good!Some of the other foreign kit makers (Heller,especially) do cut some corners.
In the resin corner I'd say that Jimmy Flintstone makes a good body for a cheap price,R&R has low quality,and Modelhaus,while acknowledged to be the best in the field,still gives me pause as I've had varying luck with their items.

icon_modeler
01-06-2012, 10:09 PM
what a contradictory pair of statements.
so by your rationale, if tamiya kits almost assemble themselves, surely you are just an assembler if you like them?

I knew some would have a hard time with my statements but that's OK.

Yes I do like Tamiya kits and I regard them as being the best as far a plastic goes they are also a really good place to start when you want to cut something up and make something else out of it.

For example here is a 1/12th Tamiya 935 I started ASSEMBLING a few years ago. There was a thread on here about this but all the pictures are gone now. It's been on hold for quite a few years now but some day I'll get back to it and finish the ASSEMBLY.

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0475.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0476.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0478.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0510.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0375.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0367.jpg

http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/dtcollins/1-12th%20scale%20935%20Moby%20Dick/IMG_0374.jpg

There are modelers and there are assemblers, which are you?? This is a general question that anyone who buys a model kit must ask themselves......

This is a general question as is stated that anyone buying a model kit should ask themselves. If you are a Modeler then the sky is the limit with the subject and the media with which the kit is made from. If you're an Assembler you better stick with something that is fundamentally easy like a Tamiya kit is. If you have trouble with a Tamiya kit that is to most I know regarded as the best in plastic modeling then maybe modeling is not for you. At any rate if any part of the hobby makes you hate something then again, maybe modeling is not your cup of tea. Saying you hate one of the best companies in the industry does not say much about your skills when it is presented as it is above. Why not tell us why you hate Tamiya, that would go along way to helping people understand the context of the statement.

corvettekid_7684
01-07-2012, 12:15 AM
I agree with the kits being good or bad regardless of manufacturer. I'm also not sure if I'm an assembler or a modeler...I guess I'm an assembler since I haven't scratch built anything except for very minor bits...

One more thing, the Japanese kit from the '70's I'm building now is one of the best kits I've seen yet (but I'm still kinda new to the hobby)

hirofkd
01-08-2012, 12:11 AM
>> Constantino
Tamiya is different. They focus more on ease of assembly, so their products can be accepted by modelers of all ages and skill levels. In Japan, kids start building models with Bandai's Gundam kits (most of them are flawlessly engineered), and then move on to scale models, typically with a Tamiya kit, which is ideal for improving basic skills because it's free from fitting problems or ambiguous instructions.

The other manufacturers target model builders with some experience, and the issues you had with Revell kits are quite common. But once you gain more experience, you won't even be bothered by minor imperfections. (Revell's quality is fairly good.)

And like the others said, all manufacturers have good and bad kits, so you just have to be specific. Try to find some WIP threads of a kit you're interested in before you buy.

Constantino
01-08-2012, 01:05 AM
well that is great to hear guys, opens up the potential makes to built very nicely.

icon_modeler
01-08-2012, 11:40 AM
I agree with the kits being good or bad regardless of manufacturer. I'm also not sure if I'm an assembler or a modeler...I guess I'm an assembler since I haven't scratch built anything except for very minor bits...

One more thing, the Japanese kit from the '70's I'm building now is one of the best kits I've seen yet (but I'm still kinda new to the hobby)

You don't need to "scratch build" anything to call yourself a "modeler". All you need is to have the abuility to overcome the short comings of an imperfect kit. Someone who only "assembles" a kit can not do this and gets frustrated and gives up.

MidMazar
01-09-2012, 01:04 AM
They're all good in their own way. :)

rallymaster
01-09-2012, 09:00 AM
Anyone having tried to build anything called CB-COM knows what means bad manufacterer !!
Appart this extremity, I don't see a particular manufacterer havong to be called "bad" like if everything from him was useless, but on the opposite side some manufacterers keep releasing perfect models and stuff, I think to Scale Production for example and I really see the AF russian buddies new brand Modeling Master being part of such reference ones !

ManicRC
01-09-2012, 10:27 AM
My favorite by far is Tamiya for the molding quality and ease of assembly. AMT seems to be the worst in general with lousy detail and fit. Revell is hit and miss. I have the 2009 SRT8 Challenger SE kit and it is very good but others in the past have been lousy like the Revell/Monogram 1987 Grand National. Worst kit I have ever tried to build.

roymattblack
01-10-2012, 06:04 PM
Tamiya???
Assembly-only???
Kits for novices???
I must get my kits from a different Tamiya to some of you guys.
Who wrote the rule that says a well engineered, brilliantly designed, packaged and presented kit, with possibly the best instructions ever, is aimed at novices???
That's like saying Shakespeare is aimed at children because it's written in superb prose!!!
Or Aston Martins are aimed at poor drivers/owners because they're built well and last for years. (95% of all Astons EVER built are still on the road)
Tamiya kits are amazing, incredibly detailed kits (mostly)
Give the Enzo kit to a novice and see how it turns out.
Probably one of the most highly detailed 1/24 kits ever made.
Yes, Revell are miles better than a few years ago, but they still aren't in the Tamiya league.
Fujimi????
They're now a basic, overpriced, poorly designed and badly fitting joke.
Only ancient Airfix is worse. Strangely, OLDER Fujimi kits are pretty good.
Hasegawa? - not sure as I haven't built one recently.
AMT, Monogram, etc etc - no comment.
Roy - sticking up for Tamiya.

drunken monkey
01-12-2012, 05:38 PM
You're missing the point.
A kit that is engineered better is naturally easier for those with less skill to put together.
If you a complete novice, the last thing I'm going to point you towards is a 30 year old Enthusiast Porsche kit because that will only drive you nuts with it's fragile plastic and fragile mounting points and oh so many teeny tiny parts.

Which leads to that old beaten horse; which is actually the better kit?
The one that has every possible detail included in it's parts but is a bugger to put together or the simpler one that anyone can put together?

The answer lies not in the kit but your level of skill.
I like to think I'm relatively competent in this hobby and my favourite kits are often the older "crappier" ones that people complain about.
Except I don't complain.
Why?
Because the things that people complain about I can work around.
Crap suspension parts? No problem, I'll scratch up some new shocks and springs.
Incorrect body detail? No problem, I'll add a little putty and reshape as necessary.

Now I'm actually more of a car fan than a modelling fan so what I prefer in my kits are a full engine so even if it's badly detailed, it gives me a chance to improve it. I'm competent but not so good that I can happily scratch up my own engine block (not that I haven't) for every curbside kit. With that in mind, I am therefore not a big fan of modern Tamiya kits because with the exception of their once a year flagship releases, their curbside kits, nicely engineered that they are, aren't interesting enough for me. If I like the car I'd be more inclined to get one but so far, I'm happy with my older crappier kits. With that said, I'm not even that big a fan of their recent big releases. Not a fan of the Enzo, don't like the McLaren SLR, prefer a DB9 to a DBS. I got the GTR because I wanted to build all three (Tamiya, Fujimi, Aoshima - haven't touched any of them).

I build kits of cars I like, not kits from any particular manufactuer and judging by my sig, Tamiya simply don't make many kits of cars that I like. The Tamiya kits I do have are their old "full detailed" kits from the 90s and well, the 90s were at least 10 years ago now.

roymattblack
01-12-2012, 06:51 PM
I completely agree with all your points.
MY point however, was that I didn't agree with the earlier comment that Tamiya kits were in some way no good.
Surely nobody can deny that they are (generally) pretty amazing.
I too am first and foremost a car fan, and a kit builder second.
I've owned 5 different Lotus, 2 Jaguars (My current car is an XK8 Silverstone) and a Porsche Carrera (Horrible car - I ditched it afer 6 months) And I've rebuilt a '72 MGB GT from a heap of scrap, and a '70 Spitfire that was even worse!
My 'dream' kit would be to restore an old E-Type Jaguar.
I love Tamiya kits as they 'fit' but I also go 'overboard' and add LOTS of extra detail.
I agree, they also make some pretty awful subject matter - I HATE Porsche with a vengeance - and they make LOADS of nondescript Japanese garbage, but the occasional gem emerges.
The recent Aston was lovely, but a sadly missed opportunity to make a superb detailed kit.
I actually did a RHD conversion on the kit, that featured in the 4SW model car magazine and on a few other forums. A lot of work, but at least I ended up with a 'proper' Aston Martin.
Have a peep here for my WIP:
http://www.escalemodels.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=7577
I also love some of the ancient kits and enjoy the challenge of making a 'silk purse from a sows ear'.
I think we both have the same kit building ideas in mind.
I'm 57 and have been kit building/bashing for almost 50 years.
I NEVER build a kit 'out of the box' any more, but I still love the challenge of tweaking a Tamiya 1/12 F1 car kit.
The only trouble is finding somewhere to put them.
I currently have 10 different 1/12 kits, and 3 x 1/8 kits, including the amazing 1/8 McLaren from DeAgostini!!!
That doesn't include quite a few 1/16 and 1/18 kits!!!
(I'm still after the Tamiya 1/12 Ferrari 314T....)
Above all, I enjoy a challenge!
An ancient Revell Chevrolet Bel air was one of the most 'fun' builds I can remember.
I'm currently sorting out a half-built Brabham BT46 that was a mess!
This hobby is fun......
Roy.

drunken monkey
01-13-2012, 02:19 AM
I completely agree with all your points.
MY point however, was that I didn't agree with the earlier comment that Tamiya kits were in some way no good.

you may want to go back and read the thread again; no one said they were no good.

dozman
01-13-2012, 03:34 AM
Roy, you are mad :runaround: You rebuilt a Spitfire!!!:screwy: Although an E-Type would be interesting.

I don't really see any manufacturer of plastic kits as being bad though sure some of their kits aren't the greatest (including some of the old skool Tamiya).

I think the bad element is when manufacturers over state the kit contents, I'm thinking more along the lines of some of the re-releases by Fujimi here. They have a wide range of kits but some of their "racing" car kits leave a lot to be desired for the price the customer is expected to pay.

As for me being an assembler or a modeler, well I have assembled a collection of unbuilt kits that I intend to model.......

corvettekid_7684
01-13-2012, 02:44 PM
Well, I still think I'm an assembler since the biggest problem a kit could have is to not exist, & would be beyond my skills to build (assemble?)

I also like to have engines in mine :)

roymattblack
01-13-2012, 02:48 PM
I like an engine too.
It bugs me these days when some new kits come out and they're 'kerbside' (UK here...) but they still charge 30 -40!!!
Newer Revell are great in this respect though - some VERY nicely detailed kits at bargain money.
The new 1/16 Rolls Royce is a case in point. Brilliant.
Roy.

SmokeyR67
01-13-2012, 04:02 PM
there are no good/bad kit manufacturers; only good/bad kits.


Or in fact, only good/bad modellers

eyckles
01-13-2012, 04:07 PM
To me Tamiya is the best manufacturer for model kits, because they go well together. So i prefer that, but i also build revell, fujimi, hasegawa and italeri kits and never had a bad kit. I had problems with them, but as a modeler there is always a solution IMHO.The only thing with revell and italeri is, that you have to do some modifications to turn them in to a nice finished model. The only problem with fujimi and hasegawa. There in my opinion to many parts. Like the Lotus 79 from Tamiya has far more less parts than the Hasegawa, but why do they look the same when finished! I personally think you have to put more effort in a hasegawa kit than a tamiya kit to get the same result. It's also the same with fujimi kits. Just my 2 cents.

Atb,
Lesley

drunken monkey
01-13-2012, 08:02 PM
Or in fact, only good/bad modellers

or perhaps a combination of both:

good modeller/bad kit
bad modeller/good kit
good modeller/good kit
bad modeller/bad kit

which if we imagine the results of those combinations, goes back to reinforcing your statement that there are only good/bad modellers.

I've never been sure what the obsession with "best model manufacturer" is.
Why catagorise them as good/bad?
I've always seen it as a case of hard kits and easy kits; kits that require more effort and kits that don't; in fact, in the same way that Revell categorise their own kits with the skill level on the box (although they tend to relate it to kit parts count).
Is it because some people don't want to accept that perhaps they aren't as good as they think they are and so rate them as good/bad instead of hard/easy because well, they don't like the idea that a kit is too hard for them so it must just be that the kit is bad?

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