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Zero paint questions and concerns


GirchyGirchy
12-15-2011, 04:41 PM
Hi,

I was hoping to get some questions answered about the Zero paints. I'm using the grey primer with the black and normal (non-2k) clear lacquer. I sprayed the primer using the cheap lowest-level Testors airbrush they make, and had mixed results. The thing kept clogging and just didn't seem to put out much primer, even at 30 PSI.

The car looked ok, and the other night I went to sand it for the base coat, and the primer was wearing through with barely any strokes of the sandpaper. I just think it didn't go on thick enough, but it seemed to be using enough primer.

Any thoughts on this? Right now I'm thinking I need to thin it a little more. I have a new Paasche airbrush to use the next time. And it appears I need a little more primer on there than I first thought. Sound like a plan?

I have a couple of bottles of Testors airbrush thinner from a while back, I'm assuming these can be used to thin the Zero paint a bit further? If not, any suggestions as for what to use?

Thanks,
Brian

kans0002
12-15-2011, 04:46 PM
i find that the zero primer is awesome stuff, but really thick. i use regular hardware store laquer thinner to thin zero primer and it while it does seem to work for me i am not sure if this is the best way. i usually thin at a 1:1 ratio and spray around 20 psi.

hth

stu

GirchyGirchy
12-16-2011, 09:12 AM
Cool, I'll look around for some lacquer thinner tonight. Thanks for the tip!

Anyone know if/when it is too cold to airbrush? I'm wondering if I could get away with carting the air compressor inside to get it to room temp along with the cars and paint and airbrush, then move everything in the garage only to do the airbrushing. Once that's done move it back inside to dry.

icon_modeler
12-16-2011, 10:38 AM
Cool, I'll look around for some lacquer thinner tonight. Thanks for the tip!

Anyone know if/when it is too cold to airbrush? I'm wondering if I could get away with carting the air compressor inside to get it to room temp along with the cars and paint and airbrush, then move everything in the garage only to do the airbrushing. Once that's done move it back inside to dry.

Tempreture will definatly effect the out come of your paint application. Just a guess, but I wouldn't paint if the temps were any lower then about 65-70 degrees. The warmer the better!!!

stevenoble
12-16-2011, 05:33 PM
Cool, I'll look around for some lacquer thinner tonight. Thanks for the tip!

Anyone know if/when it is too cold to airbrush? I'm wondering if I could get away with carting the air compressor inside to get it to room temp along with the cars and paint and airbrush, then move everything in the garage only to do the airbrushing. Once that's done move it back inside to dry.

You can use almost any lacquer thinner for the Zero paints. I use a really cheap 'gun wash' thinner for flushing the airbrush when I'm finished spraying and the more expensive 'base coat' thinner for thinning the paints when I spray them.
You can warm up all your gear before you go out to the garage and that would help. But it will probably cool down again before you've finished your spraying. More important is the air temperature in the garage, because if that is low then that may affect the outcome of your painting. I am lucky to have an extractor fan and a Mr Dry Booth in my modelling room. So all my painting is carried out in the house where the temperature is good. I would say they are two of the best purchases I ever made and certainly changed the way I paint for the better.
I can't seem to get on with the Zero primers. I tried them many times and they always sprayed with cob webs and dusting. I tried many variants of thinning and air pressure to no avail. I just use Tamiya aerosol primer now as it's quick, good quality and fits my needs. A bit expensive but I don't build too many models these days so the cost sort of evens itself out..

360spider
12-17-2011, 10:11 AM
Make sure you mix (I prefer stirring instead of shaking) it REALLY good. Like for 5 minutes or so. If it is think - thin it with lacquer thinner.

GirchyGirchy
12-19-2011, 02:34 PM
I can't seem to get on with the Zero primers. I tried them many times and they always sprayed with cob webs and dusting. I tried many variants of thinning and air pressure to no avail. I just use Tamiya aerosol primer now as it's quick, good quality and fits my needs. A bit expensive but I don't build too many models these days so the cost sort of evens itself out..

Interesting...so you just use Tamiya spray cans? Do you use the fine such as this one:

http://www.ehobbies.com/tam87064.html

About the only place I could do it other than the garage is the basement, but not many options for venting it outside without still smelling up the house and/or making a mess of the new windows and door down there. Sounds like I'll be waiting until spring - I'll just start working on engines and interiors for other kits now, I can always quickly spray can that stuff.

Make sure you mix (I prefer stirring instead of shaking) it REALLY good. Like for 5 minutes or so. If it is think - thin it with lacquer thinner.
I did both, first stirring with some sprue and then shaking the dickens out of it to get it fully mixed. Once I was done it seemed ok to me, perhaps I should have done it a bit more with the additional thinner.

Thanks for the tips guys!

stevenoble
12-19-2011, 06:23 PM
Interesting...so you just use Tamiya spray cans? Do you use the fine such as this one:

http://www.ehobbies.com/tam87064.html


Yes, that's the exact kind I use in grey or white. I only use the primer in spray cans. For colours and clear coat I use Zero paints exclusively now. I love the paints, just can't master their primer...

John18d
12-20-2011, 03:24 AM
Yes, that's the exact kind I use in grey or white. I only use the primer in spray cans. For colours and clear coat I use Zero paints exclusively now. I love the paints, just can't master their primer...


I'm with you Steve - I only use those Tamiya "fine" spray can primers for primer - and the Zero paints - not exclusively, but for any bodies - cowling definitely and I love 2K urethane clear - once that urethane clear is mastered I cannot see the use of any other type of clear for creating a high gloss smooth as glass surface - john

GirchyGirchy
12-29-2011, 09:29 AM
Just ordered some of the white and grey Tamiya fine primers, we'll see how they go once they arrive. Threw in some 2K clear to try out as well.

Thanks guys!

John18d
12-29-2011, 12:27 PM
Just ordered some of the white and grey Tamiya fine primers, we'll see how they go once they arrive. Threw in some 2K clear to try out as well.

Thanks guys!

GirchyGirchy - when you use the 2K clear on models that have decals - I always spray a very "sparse" thin "tack" coat of the 2K clear over the decals and let it dry for a couple of hours then I spray a normal "wet" coat and then 15-30 minutes spray a thick "flow" coat that gives a like glass appearance that does not require polishing unless you get a "flaw" in the clear. If you do have to polish I wait for at least a week to let the 2K clear harden and allow for all the VOCs to be released. This has been my method with "Zero" 2K clear, but I would imagine any 2K would be similar. Of course I suggest that you experiment on your own with what you have - just be aware that some clears are very aggressive and can damage decals. - John

Dr.AK
12-30-2011, 07:38 PM
Sorry for thread-jacking, but I've got a quick question... may be a stupid question really, but I haven't found anything with the search.


Are zero paints compatible with Revell enamels? For example painting a dashboard with Zero Paints in black and then adding some slight silver dots for buttons or something using Revell enamels? Or will the two kinds of paint react?

Reason being that I still have some of the Enamels sitting around, but have not used the Zeros yet (just ordered, hasn't arrived yet).

John18d
01-01-2012, 07:55 AM
Sorry for thread-jacking, but I've got a quick question... may be a stupid question really, but I haven't found anything with the search.


Are zero paints compatible with Revell enamels? For example painting a dashboard with Zero Paints in black and then adding some slight silver dots for buttons or something using Revell enamels? Or will the two kinds of paint react?

Reason being that I still have some of the Enamels sitting around, but have not used the Zeros yet (just ordered, hasn't arrived yet).


Dr. AK - enamels are pretty safe to put over anything. The only exception might be some "acrylics" - The usual line is lacquers-enamels-acrylics, but I believe the Zero paints are synthetic urethanes which "spray" thin like lacquers but "color up" quick like enamels, As always I suggest you do a "test" first whenever mixing different paint types and brands "manufacturers. Hope this helps - John

GirchyGirchy
01-02-2012, 02:35 PM
GirchyGirchy - when you use the 2K clear on models that have decals - I always spray a very "sparse" thin "tack" coat of the 2K clear over the decals and let it dry for a couple of hours then I spray a normal "wet" coat and then 15-30 minutes spray a thick "flow" coat that gives a like glass appearance that does not require polishing unless you get a "flaw" in the clear. If you do have to polish I wait for at least a week to let the 2K clear harden and allow for all the VOCs to be released. This has been my method with "Zero" 2K clear, but I would imagine any 2K would be similar. Of course I suggest that you experiment on your own with what you have - just be aware that some clears are very aggressive and can damage decals. - John

I'm sticking with Zero clears so it should work fine. Thanks again for all of the advice!

GirchyGirchy
01-05-2012, 10:17 AM
GD, now I just need to find a place with the Tamiya primer in stock that'll ship to the US.

Edit: Looks like Elm City Hobbies in Canada will ship 'em ground to the US. Yay!

kans0002
01-05-2012, 10:32 AM
http://www.hobbylinc.com/cgi-bin/s8.cgi?str_s=tamiya+primer&ss=1#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=tamiya%20primer&gsc.page=1

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