Bleeding air from 3.8 cooling system


Cessnadriver
04-17-2011, 02:34 PM
I have a 2000 3.8 SEL that makes a sound in the passenger compartment like air is being pushed through the heater core whenever it starts. I'm pretty sure that it's air in the cooling system, and it's been in there since I replaced the metal line under the intake manifold a while back. (the one everybody seems to have to replace sooner or later).
What is the procedure for bleeding the air out? I've looked all over for a bleed port, as I've seen on other vehicles I've owned, but no luck. I think this may also be causing some hot start rough idle problems due to water not being in contact with the sensors.
Thanks

tempfixit
04-17-2011, 05:43 PM
I have a 2000 3.8 SEL that makes a sound in the passenger compartment like air is being pushed through the heater core whenever it starts. I'm pretty sure that it's air in the cooling system, and it's been in there since I replaced the metal line under the intake manifold a while back. (the one everybody seems to have to replace sooner or later).
What is the procedure for bleeding the air out? I've looked all over for a bleed port, as I've seen on other vehicles I've owned, but no luck. I think this may also be causing some hot start rough idle problems due to water not being in contact with the sensors.
Thanks

How long has it been since you changed the pipe?? Have you added coolant since the replacement??? Parking the front of the vehicle on a hill or on car ramps so the radiator sets higher and removing the radiator cap and added any coolant then running so the cooling fans kick on at least once will help burp the system. ALso turn the heat control on full heat no need to have the heating fan going. WHat is the level of coolant in resorvoir when cold??

Is check engine light on??? Any codes??

mark_gober
04-17-2011, 05:59 PM
I have a 2000 3.8 SEL that makes a sound in the passenger compartment like air is being pushed through the heater core whenever it starts. I'm pretty sure that it's air in the cooling system, and it's been in there since I replaced the metal line under the intake manifold a while back. (the one everybody seems to have to replace sooner or later).
What is the procedure for bleeding the air out? I've looked all over for a bleed port, as I've seen on other vehicles I've owned, but no luck. I think this may also be causing some hot start rough idle problems due to water not being in contact with the sensors.
Thanks

I have a 2000 that recently did this. I simply added more antifreeze and the sound went away. Hopefully that helps. BTW, add the fluid to the overflow tank on the left side of the engine compartment.

Mark

12Ounce
04-17-2011, 10:25 PM
The Windstar cooling system is fairly self-bleeding when all is "well" with the various components. Just keep adding coolant.

But there can be problems ... if the system is plugged or partially plugged (caused by poor coolant maintenance) ... the pump is not pumping well ... or if the thermostat has failed.

Cessnadriver
04-17-2011, 11:58 PM
How long has it been since you changed the pipe?? Have you added coolant since the replacement??? Parking the front of the vehicle on a hill or on car ramps so the radiator sets higher and removing the radiator cap and added any coolant then running so the cooling fans kick on at least once will help burp the system. ALso turn the heat control on full heat no need to have the heating fan going. WHat is the level of coolant in resorvoir when cold??

Is check engine light on??? Any codes??

I have a 2000 that recently did this. I simply added more antifreeze and the sound went away. Hopefully that helps. BTW, add the fluid to the overflow tank on the left side of the engine compartment.

Mark

No codes, no overheating. It's been quite a few months since I replaced the pipe. I did notice the coolant level down a bit today while doing an oil change and just checking out all fluids. I'll park it on a hill and let it run till the fans kick on, and see if that helps.

olopezm
04-18-2011, 09:08 PM
There is a suggested procedure for it. I had to learn it the bad way (the van overheated and the heads got warped...)

1.- Mix the coolant and distilled water to the proportion specified in the owner's manual.

2.- Run the engine for a few minutes after topping off the coolant overflow tank and then shut it off.

3.- Raise the hood and open the coolant overflow bottle and fill it to the "Cold Fill" line using the mixture of coolant and distilled water you created in step one.

4.- Run the engine again for several more minutes with the bottle open. While the engine is running, switch the internal temperature setting to hot so your heater is blowing full blast into the passenger compartment. Continue this until you notice the coolant level going down. Once this occurs, shut the engine off again.

5.- Open the coolant overflow bottle. Top the coolant again with the coolant and distilled water mixture. If you still feel there is air in the system, move to step six.

6.- Drive the vehicle until it reaches full operating temperature and then park it and shut the engine off. Wait for the engine to cool back down, which can take up to 12 hours depending on the ambient temperature. Once the engine is cool, open the overflow tank again and fill it to the "Cold Fill" line.

Oscar.

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