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98 Dodge ram 1500 fuel pump


82Stang
01-08-2011, 12:16 AM
Ok sure this is basic, so I will see what's the right diagnostic.

1998 Dodge Ram 1500 5.2L 4x4 standard

Truck died on the way home. I removed the bed bolts, 4 up front, left two rear in, and raised the bed. Turned key on and took my multimeter and got 5.11volts to the pump. I am assuming it is a bad pump as the truck has 212K plus on it. The truck battery was dead from all the starting, so I jumped with my Blazer, but still get 5.11volts. I checked the fuses and the relays. Am I right in assuming, it is indeed the fuel pump? Just want to make sure before buying the darn thing which is atleast 200+. Thanks guys. No sound from the fuel pump when trying to start, nothing.

danielsatur
01-08-2011, 01:45 AM
1) Get a 5-gal gas can, 4' of hose, and connect it to the fuel filter.
2) Turn the ignition key to the ON pos for a short.
3) Is the fuel pump working?

82Stang
01-08-2011, 11:19 AM
1) Get a 5-gal gas can, 4' of hose, and connect it to the fuel filter.
2) Turn the ignition key to the ON pos for a short.
3) Is the fuel pump working?


Hi Dan,

Fuel pump is not working, no noise, nothing. I just about have it out already. Can I bench test this by hooking up cables?

Scrapper
01-08-2011, 12:57 PM
Hi Dan,

Fuel pump is not working, no noise, nothing. I just about have it out already. Can I bench test this by hooking up cables?

i'd say it was your fuel pump also.

danielsatur
01-08-2011, 01:32 PM
It already sounds like you proven it as being bad!
If you got Volts, your fuse + relay is good.

Because of Age, mileage, wear, and tear your truck needs a new pump, but
$200 Ouch!

$179 @ http://wwwautopartswarehouse.com
Caution - You really don't want an electrial ark flash around gasoline.

82Stang
01-08-2011, 08:10 PM
Caution - You really don't want an electrial ark flash around gasoline.

Ditto that Dan. You'd think common sense would prevail with people and gas and spark = not good! :nono:

I've heard of guys putting the pump in a bucket of gas, but if you ask me, that's not something I'd recommend doing. If you want all your hair. I also saw one video on youtube where the guy verified the pump wasn't bad after removing it. But the whole time he kept bench testing it and saying it was good. I'd say after running that thing 10 secs or more not in liquid, that would kill a fuel pump anyway. Some guys just put it back in, not me though. A new pump all the way. I'm not going through assembly only to break down a week later.

$179 is not a bad price Dan. If it beats rockauto.com, then sold. Thanks.

82Stang
01-22-2011, 06:18 PM
Just wanted to update and end this thread on a good note.

After mulling over dropping the tank(1/2 full) or cutting a hole in the bed or lifting the bed, I'm happy to say it was rather easy to lift the bed by myself. I unbolted the front 4 bolts and loosened the rear two and jacked the bed up with a two by four just like a dump bed. Easy peazy. I could get my whole body underneath to the top of the tank. I plan on doing it this way for all my future truck fuel pumps.

New pump/sending unit installed and all was well. Except for one dead battery, which cleaning the terminals and rejumping cured right away. Truck starts and runs perfect now, or atleast as perfect as it was before.

So for those that are wondering which is easiest to do when changing the pump, it's the bed lift all the way for me. It's done properly and much, much easier than dropping that 26 gal tank.

Thanks for the responses.

mikefaster
01-22-2011, 07:55 PM
LOL... Dropping the tank can't be all that bad; especially since my V10 is always on "E"!!!

82Stang
01-23-2011, 12:31 PM
LOL... Dropping the tank can't be all that bad; especially since my V10 is always on "E"!!!


It's not hard to drop the tank, per se, but it is difficult when you have 15 gals of fuel in it. The actual job of dropping the fuel tank is pretty much straight forward. Two straps, lower and unhook lines etc. But it was rediculously easy to lift the bed instead and not have to be on the ground reaching up on top to disconnect lines while trying to hold the tank in the snow.

And on the the replacement end of things, after the pump is installed, you can run it and make sure everything works BEFORE dropping the bed back down. Putting a fuel pump in from underneath and reinstalling the tank only to find out it still doesn't work, is no fun.

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