Timing belt and oil leak ?


masic_2000
12-28-2010, 04:54 PM
Hi:

My mechanic said I have an oil leak from the oil pan and that they had to remove the timing belt to fix the problem. Does this make sense? Why would you have to remove the timing belt to fix an oil leak? He also asked if I wanted to change the water pump now that everything is exposed. I have 130,000 miles on a camry 2000 4 cyl.

Thanks.

Mike Gerber
12-28-2010, 05:49 PM
No, that doesn't make sense, unless there are several leaks and you misunderstood what he said. The oil pan can leak and to repair that you do not have to remove the timing belt. However, there are cam and crank seals under the timing belt, that are fairly common areas to leak. The timing belt would have to be removed to repair those leaks.

As far as the water pump, it would probably be a good idea to replace it now IMHO, if it is the original water pump. Just make sure he is only charging you an additional half hour to 1 hour of labor for replacing it, while timing belt is already off. That additional labor charge does not include the cost of the pump itself. You might also want to consider replacing the timing belt itself, if it has more than 30,000 miles on it. The new belt should be $30 - $40 for the belt itself, with no additional labor charge. Then you should be set for another 90,000 miles.

Mike

masic_2000
12-28-2010, 07:20 PM
Thanks for the info, Mike.

It will come in handy when it comes time to pay.

masic_2000
12-29-2010, 07:23 PM
Ok. So this is what they did:

Valve cover gasket
Crank oil seal
oil pump seal
new timing belt
new water pump

at 130,000 miles.

Thats all folks.

ukrkoz
12-29-2010, 11:37 PM
so they fixed main seal leak. oil leak was sipping down from main seal onto the oil pan. looks like oil pan gasket is leaking. yes, to get to the main seal, you have to remove main pulley, and, accordingly, timing belt.

unfortunately, on some cars, to have timing belt cover removed, valve cover has to be removed, resulting in new gasket.

so far, it all looks legit. what they should have also done, was to replace timing belt tensioner pulley, if there's one, which there should.

it's one of those things that "you do it as you are there". i did exactly same for my 91 civic, and we did exactly same for my wife's RX300. it is hard to get to areas, on sidewise mounted engines, esp on Asian makes. better some expense now, than do-over down the road.

jdmccright
12-30-2010, 01:59 AM
They should have replaced the camshaft oil seal, too...why do only two of three when it's already apart? The tensioner and idler pulleys aren't bad ideas but they tend to last a long time. Unless they are showing signs of wear, maybe not at that mileage, but should be replaced down the road at the next timing belt change.

Remember to have that cam oil seal replaced at the next timing belt change.

Hope this helps!

JOET/CAMRY
01-01-2011, 11:05 AM
Ok. So this is what they did:

Valve cover gasket
Crank oil seal
oil pump seal
new timing belt
new water pump

at 130,000 miles.

Thats all folks.

I wonder if the oil pump seal they replaced was the oil pump shaft seal or the oil pump "spaghetti" seal.

Yea, it would of been nice to get the camshaft seal replaced at the time also while it was taken apart. :banghead:

JOET/CAMRY

jdmccright
01-02-2011, 11:16 AM
Likely the oil pump shaft seal...they aren't known for making more work for themselves. If it's obvious it was leaking, they would've charged you for it.

Jimbello
05-08-2012, 03:26 AM
I wonder if the oil pump seal they replaced was the oil pump shaft seal or the oil pump "spaghetti" seal.

.......................... :banghead:

JOET/CAMRY

What is the "spaghetti" seal please? Where is it?

jdmccright
05-08-2012, 08:15 AM
I believe he is referring to the thin gasket that seals the oil pump body to the engine block. This is less common for an oil leak to originate from than the oil pump shaft seal, but both require the timing pulley and belt to be removed.

zzyzzx2
05-08-2012, 12:00 PM
Ia there some reason why the oil pump isn't replaced (or maybe just the seal) when a timing belt is replaced on these cars? Isn't the oil pump timing belt driven?

jdmccright
05-08-2012, 12:26 PM
The seals aren't a regular service item, but they usually start to leak around 180-200k miles due to age. The oil and water pumps are timing belt driven, but does not need replacing at regular intervals.

I'd replace the seals at every other timing belt change; replace water pump, idler & tensioner pulley, and oil pump case seal every 3 belt changes.

JOET/CAMRY
05-08-2012, 08:50 PM
I believe he is referring to the thin gasket that seals the oil pump body to the engine block. This is less common for an oil leak to originate from than the oil pump shaft seal, but both require the timing pulley and belt to be removed.

The spaghetti seal I was refering to is actually called an oil pump O-Ring. Alot of people call it a spaghetti seal because it looks similar to a strand of spaghetti thats connected "end to end" :). I have included a picture below for reference that was scanned from my Haynes Repair Manual for 1983 - 1991 Camrys.


http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p98/JOET1966/oilpumpexplodedview.jpg

JOET/CAMRY
05-08-2012, 08:56 PM
What is the "spaghetti" seal please? Where is it?

Refer to the pic on post # 13. Its actually called the oil pump O-Ring.

Jimbello
05-13-2012, 08:44 PM
Refer to the pic on post # 13. Its actually called the oil pump O-Ring.

Thanks for that Joet!

I'm ordering all the front engine seals for mine with plans of doing it sometime soon.
I've ordered the following:

1. Crankshaft seal.
2. Camshaft seal.
3. Oil pump gasket.
4. Oil pump seal.

Is there anything I've missed here for the front of the engine?

J.

JOET/CAMRY
05-15-2012, 09:30 PM
Thanks for that Joet!

I'm ordering all the front engine seals for mine with plans of doing it sometime soon.
I've ordered the following:

1. Crankshaft seal.
2. Camshaft seal.
3. Oil pump gasket.
4. Oil pump seal.

Is there anything I've missed here for the front of the engine?

J.

The oil pump "O-Ring". :smile:

When I had my 89 Camry and was replacing the timing belt and water pump I also replaced the camshaft and crankshaft seals, the oil pump O-Ring (spaghetti seal) and oil pump shaft seal. The only thing I didn't replace was the oil pump case to block gasket. I would of had to drop the oil pan to get at it. It wasn't leaking so I decided to leave it alone.

JOET/CAMRY

Jimbello
05-15-2012, 11:54 PM
The oil pump "O-Ring". :smile:

................... I would of had to drop the oil pan to get at it. It wasn't leaking so I decided to leave it alone.

JOET/CAMRY

I did buy the "O-ring" when I was at the auto shop. So I have a seal and the "O-ring", but no gasket. I asked them, but they didn't have a listing on it. Besides, if I have to remove the sump to replace it, I don't know if I want to go that far. Seems curious that you do, why is that? I suppose I will find out when I get it apart at the weekend.

Thanks,

jim.

edit: has anyone replaced the crankshaft main seal without the special tool? If so, how?

JOET/CAMRY
05-18-2012, 05:19 PM
[Jimbello;6978335] Besides, if I have to remove the sump to replace it, I don't know if I want to go that far. Seems curious that you do, why is that? I suppose I will find out when I get it apart at the weekend.

No, I never said that You should replace the oil pump case to block gasket. I only said that I did not replace it on my own 1989 Camry when I used to own one.
I did however replace the oil pump shaft seal and the oil pump O-Ring (spaghetti seal). I read somewere on this fourm that their could be an oil leak comming from the "oil pump case to block gasket" but it is unlikely.:)

JOET/CAMRY
05-18-2012, 05:31 PM
has anyone replaced the crankshaft main seal without the special tool? If so, how?

When I replaced the crankshaft seal on my 1989 Camry I carefully drilled 2 small holes in the seal 180 degrees apart from each other. Then I screwed a sheetmetal screw in each hole. I then grabed the head of the screws with a pair of pliers or better yet vice grips and slowly worked the seal out. :iceslolan

Jimbello
05-18-2012, 11:40 PM
When I replaced the crankshaft seal on my 1989 Camry I carefully drilled 2 small holes in the seal 180 degrees apart from each other. Then I screwed a sheetmetal screw in each hole. I then grabed the head of the screws with a pair of pliers or better yet vice grips and slowly worked the seal out. :iceslolan

Oh I see! The seal removal is the hard part then, is that case?
Very innovative solution you found!

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