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Start Up after Long downtime


steviek
12-15-2010, 11:19 PM
Hey guys I'm anticipating on starting my DSM up for the first time in over a year. It was fully functioning when I put it away and I've been gone.

Aside from the battery being dead and maybe a flat tire I'm wondering whats the healthiest way to bring the beast back to life.

Oil wise, gas wise, how long I should run it etc.

Blackcrow64
12-16-2010, 01:05 PM
Check all your fluids before starting it of course. I would let it idle for a while after you start it the first time and inspect things to make sure everything is running ok. Maybe check your tuning to ensure nothing has gotten changed since you parked it...

Scrapper
12-16-2010, 02:00 PM
i would even check vaccum hoses and wires under hood to make sure there isn't any chewed up like squirrels,mice they love to chew on them i dono why but they do. i shot a bunch of piney squirrels they were getting in my 23ft. r/v 2 of them died in there i had decon in it. that is if you got any these roadents around?

steviek
12-18-2010, 05:02 AM
i would even check vaccum hoses and wires under hood to make sure there isn't any chewed up like squirrels,mice they love to chew on them i dono why but they do. i shot a bunch of piney squirrels they were getting in my 23ft. r/v 2 of them died in there i had decon in it. that is if you got any these roadents around?

No i'm pretty sure my storatge place is rodent free but I will check anyways. ANy other things guys?

Blue Bowtie
12-18-2010, 11:22 AM
If it hasn't been run at all in a year, you might want to fully charge the battery, disable the fuel, and crank it several times to start pumping and distributing oil before it is allowed to fire and run. Crank for 15-20 seconds max and allow the starter to cool between cranking cycles. After a few episodes of cranking there should at least be sufficient oil in the main and rod bearings, and some oil should start to appear at the cam followers to prevent excessive wear on startup.

As previously advised, allow the engine to idle only until it begins to reach normal temperature. Listen and watch for anything unusual while it is idling and warming up. The alternator, water pump, and AC compressor get no external lubrication and the grease used in their bearings could be dried and separated.

After that, take it easy driving to allow the lubrication in the driveline to distribute and start doing its job. The grease packed in the wheel hubs will be separated (the oil settles of of the grease) and it would be wise to drive easy for several miles to allow the oil and soap/lithium to mix and re-suspend in the grease to provide adequate lubrication. It's only a year, but it's better to be safe.

The tires may also be flat-spotted, so full inflation and a gradual warm-up drives are a good idea.

The brakes may be rusted in place, and light braking may help knock that scale off the rotors and drums without causing serious damage. The brake hydraulics may also have issues with dried seals and moisture incursion.

Belts and hoses should be inspected and replaced as necessary.

Remember that fluid changes are based on both mileage for wear AND time for oxidation and acid formation, so you don't get off the hook for oil, trans, and axle service.

As for the fuel, add only LOW octane fuel to a stored vehicle. The lighter hydrocarbons in the gas stored in the tank have been going away for a year, and tend to leave varnish and moisture behind. LOW octane fuel is more volatile (which is why it tends to detonate) and generally has fewer additives. It will help to dissolve the junk left behind and add more of the light hydrocarbons which are gone. Gasoline has a storage life after refining of about 60 days, and you're well beyond that. If the tank is steel you may want to consider a fuel filter change after a few weeks of driving.

steviek
12-19-2010, 06:10 AM
thank you very much.
Thats perfect!

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