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1996 Chrysler Town & Country Stalling


CntryBumpkin
09-09-2010, 02:47 PM
I have a chrysler town and country with the 3.8 and it started stalling at any given time with no warning, sometimes it is like you just cut the switch off and sometimes it stutters before it dies usually it starts right back but other times it takes a few minutes before it starts back. I have replaced the following parts: Cam shaft sensor, crankshaft sensor, speed sensor (output), coolant temperature sensor, fuel filter, EGR Valve, I took it to a shop and they said it was a bad Auto Run Relay (I have never heard of a Auto Run Relay but suspected they meant auto shutdown) and when I got it back from them it went dead on me 4 times on the way home. Does anyone else have a clue to what could be going on? The check engine light was on because of the bad EGR valve but after replacing it went off.

CntryBumpkin
09-10-2010, 02:27 PM
I put it back in the shop and they said it was a bad radiator cap this time. It never overheated, I do not see how that could kill the engine unless it was overheating, maybe someone can explain to me how it causes the engine to stall?

danielsatur
09-10-2010, 02:35 PM
Start with a new fuel filter, Air filter, and clean the Massive Air flow sensor.
A bad catalytic converter can choke an engine, misfiring, overheat, and stall.
Like a potato in a tail pipe, any local muffler shop will check for free.

RIP
09-10-2010, 05:20 PM
Try the free stuff first. I've read many threads involving chaffed wire bundles especially where they loop around bends near structure or near the exhaust manifold both on top and bottom of the engine. Another hotspot is under the battery tray. If yousee a bundle touching structure don't count on the protective wrap to protect the wires inside. Pull it way from the structure and have a close look.

mastertech1964
09-10-2010, 06:40 PM
i agree with rip go over the engine wiring harness with a fine tooth comb the asd relay feed all the sensors and injectors and a short in the green/orange wire anywhere on the engine can cause all kinds of problems

plymouthsrock
09-10-2010, 09:44 PM
When it's faulting (not restarting) can you hear the fuel pump when you turn the key to the run position? It should come on for a few seconds every time you turn the key to the run position. If the pump runs, you can eliminate that circuit at least.

CntryBumpkin
09-16-2010, 06:37 PM
I will have to check the wiring when I get a chance, right now it is in the shop for the fourth time, The last time I got it back from the shop they said it was the ignition coil but it was going dead on me before I could get home. Good thing they are not charging me for all this, lol. I have not really listened for the fuel pump but will next time it goes dead on me.

CntryBumpkin
09-16-2010, 06:38 PM
One question, how does the crank sensor work on this van? Does the crankshaft have magnets on it that cause the sensor to read?

CntryBumpkin
09-29-2010, 01:37 PM
I think it was the MAP sensor. I replaced the sensor and it has been doing good for about a week now.

Tom at Mayo
10-08-2010, 11:17 PM
Same problem encountered in a 2004 Town and Country 3.8. Greater then 90% of the time the stalling occurs 1-2 minutes after fueling and then driving off. On the first hint of stalling I shift into neutral, excel and drop it back into drive which clears the problem. The local dealer could not diagnosis the problem but could not reproduce it either.

RIP
10-09-2010, 02:24 AM
Same problem encountered in a 2004 Town and Country 3.8. Greater then 90% of the time the stalling occurs 1-2 minutes after fueling and then driving off. On the first hint of stalling I shift into neutral, excel and drop it back into drive which clears the problem. The local dealer could not diagnosis the problem but could not reproduce it either.

Same symptom for a whole different reason. Would have been best to post this as a new thread but you're here so...

Found this over at JustAnswer.com. It all has to do with the Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP). It's designed to trap fuel tank vapors while the van is not running then inject the vapors into the engine after you start.

"2005 Dodge Caravan stalls after refueling...started slightly 5mo ago, now it actually stalls...only occurs within the first five miles of refueling or so when I stop...if directly back on highway, doesn't stall.

Answer:

It sounds like you may be getting liquid fuel into the evaporative system, flooding the vapor canister and then flooding the engine at low throttle angles (like idle) when coming to stops.

The fuel tank uses a venting system that allows vapor to be pushed out into the vapor canister as you add fuel. This venting is necessary or the fuel being introduced would have back up in the filler neck and repeatedly shut the nozzle off.

Once the fuel level reaches its designed maximum point, a float in the ORVR (onboard refueling vapor recovery) valve rises and seals the tank vent and pressure builds, backing fuel up into the fill neck and shuts it off. Your ORVR is apparently not sealing completely or at all, allowing liquid fuel to pass to the vapor canister.

This vapor needs to be purged almost continuously to control evaporative fuel emissions as you drive, being drawn to the engine and burned with the other (liquid) fuel. It's an efficient system, something that ensures close to 100% of the fuel you pump into the tank is actually burned and not released as a pollutant.

But the engine management systems are calibrated to expect only vapor from the evaporative purge system... when liquid is passed, it's going to have much greater impact on fuel/ air mixture which is why you see the stalling.

Immediately after stalling and restart, the purge system will temporarily be disabled as a certain amount of time needs to pass before the engine can be stabilized sufficiently to handle purge flow once again. This may give you 30 to 60 seconds of decent idle quality before the next attempt at purge flow. Eventually, liquid fuel is removed and idle control returns to normal.

A way to positively identify the passage of liquid fuel in the purge line would be to wait until the engine stalls, then pull the two purge hoses off at the purge solenoid (near air cleaner front) and inspect them for liquid fuel. Disconnecting the purge solenoid after a fill event will prevent the solenoid from opening, another way to tell if the purge system would make a difference. Disconnecting the purge solenoid will turn the MIL on of course, and can only be done for diagnostic purposes like this.

Repair will be expensive, requiring fuel tank replacement since the ORVR valve is plastic-welded directly to the tank body.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to write back.

Thanks,

Ed"

This was posted by an experienced mechanic at an automotive website. I would count this as a very good chance of being your problem. Just can't say it is THE problem for sure.

mikefaster
10-13-2010, 07:46 AM
The 96-2000 vans, I don't think have the same ailments with the EVAP system as the newer 2001 up vans do...

My 1999 minivan has a reflashed computer and part of the "update" was COMPLETELY eliminating the EVAP system from throwing a code... My gas tank leaks if you fill it all the way and there is NEVER a code and it is n/a in the MIL status... REFLASHES are GOOD!!! LOL...

I would check to see if you can hear your fuel pump and the spray a little starting fluid or carb/throttle cleaner in the intake throat and see if it starts... If it does, then it's a fuel pump...

The crank sensor itself is a magnet, the flywheel has "holes" for lack of a better word, that will connect or break the signal to tell the computer when to fire in laymen's terms...

Sometimes you DO NOT hear the fuel pump and there could be nothing wrong with the fuel pump... The FUEL PUMP get's a signal from the CRANK SENSOR...

SO...

It is important to spray inside the throttle to see if it starts... If you don't hear the pump working AND it doesn't start with a spray, then you ONLY have a bad crank sensor...

Good luck

RIP
10-14-2010, 03:27 AM
The 96-2000 vans, I don't think have the same ailments with the EVAP system as the newer 2001 up vans do...

My 1999 minivan has a reflashed computer and part of the "update" was COMPLETELY eliminating the EVAP system from throwing a code... My gas tank leaks if you fill it all the way and there is NEVER a code and it is n/a in the MIL status... REFLASHES are GOOD!!! LOL...

I would check to see if you can hear your fuel pump and the spray a little starting fluid or carb/throttle cleaner in the intake throat and see if it starts... If it does, then it's a fuel pump...

The crank sensor itself is a magnet, the flywheel has "holes" for lack of a better word, that will connect or break the signal to tell the computer when to fire in laymen's terms...

Sometimes you DO NOT hear the fuel pump and there could be nothing wrong with the fuel pump... The FUEL PUMP get's a signal from the CRANK SENSOR...

SO...

It is important to spray inside the throttle to see if it starts... If you don't hear the pump working AND it doesn't start with a spray, then you ONLY have a bad crank sensor...

Good luck

Please clarify. Are you referring this post to Cntrybumpkin"s 96 GC that has already been fixed by replacing the MAP sensor or to Tom at Mayo's 2004 GC that in your words is "more prone" to EVAP problems. The later seems a contradiction.

Secondly do you have any documentation on the "EVAP code deactivation reflash"? Not doubting what you've been told but it's hard to believe Chrysler Corporation got a waiver from the EPA to deactivate any alerts indicating malfunctions in a system designed to stop a major source of hydrocarbon emissions. If Chrysler did it on their own I would have thought there would be news of a major court battle and/or record breaking fine.

mikefaster
10-14-2010, 03:40 AM
Forgive me for being new and not used to posting... Seemed like the topic was still open and did not realize that the person who originally posted the symptom fixed his problem...

You were right to tell the other gentleman to start a new post; but I should have read it more thoroughly...

It does get a little confusing when 96-2000 and 2001-up vans are compared within the post when several facets are different with the 2 different generations...

Sorry about that...
Mike

RIP
10-14-2010, 03:45 AM
Forgive me for being new and not used to posting... Seemed like the topic was still open and did not realize that the person who originally posted the symptom fixed his problem...

You were right to tell the other gentleman to start a new post; but I should have read it more thoroughly...

It does get a little confusing when 96-2000 and 2001-up vans are compared within the post when several facets are different with the 2 different generations...

Sorry about that...
Mike

Ya, a prime example of why opening old threads is not a good practice. It's too easy to lose track of who's saying what to who. Thanks for clarifying.

wamaroe
06-16-2011, 10:51 PM
My van was doing the same thing and left me stranded in a New Mexican wilderness. The problem was at a communications ribbon cable connection. The base (receptor)in the dash instument cluster panel has solder joints that, over time develop radial cracks that can cause a disruption of the low voltage circuit. Oft times people have reported fixing the problem with a sharp slap on the dash over the instrument cluster. The best repair is to remove the instrument cluster and get to the back of the cable receptor, then resoldering the connections. Be careful not to overheat the foil on the circuit board. It takes some time, but was an inepensive fix that worked for me. Thank you Jesus!

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