suspension making noise after strut replacement


spugeddy
04-09-2010, 01:43 PM
Well it was making noise before the strut replacement, but I bought two new Monroe front struts, and had them put on, but I didn't replace the mounting hardware at the top of the tower. Sorry can't remember the name of it.

Still when I go over bumps or railroad tracks, it is the same "broken shock" sounding clank (metal on metal).

Any thoughts

Airjer_
04-09-2010, 01:56 PM
Stabilizer bar links or bushings.

spugeddy
04-09-2010, 02:04 PM
I've done the P171.... repair, and brakes, shocks, etc on other cars..

Is this repair hard. And do you have to get an alignment afterwards?

Sorry for the newbie questions.

northern piper
04-09-2010, 05:37 PM
if you aren't doing any tie rods than the alignment isn't necessary really. If you're doing the sway bar bushings and end links, the next thing is your lower control arms and tie rods. You may be looking at doing the whole thing. That's what I did last year and then got the alignment done. I was of the impression that within 6 months I'd be likely doing the rest anyway so while I had things apart..

Bottom line, I'd be your clunk is sway bar bushings.

old89lsc
04-10-2010, 12:10 AM
I replaced my struts with Monroe quick struts last fall. Boy did those things squeak like crazy when they were new. They squeaked over bumps and they squeaked when turning the steering wheel. They definitely sounded more like old shocks than my old shocks did. After use, they did quiet down. Overall, though, I am not impressed.

wiswind
04-10-2010, 10:39 AM
In my case, the monroe quick struts were fine......but the stablilizer links were not.
Mine squeaked......clunked, etc after about 1 year........they were the nylon type....installed at the same time as the struts.
After a number of years, it is pretty hard to remove the stablilizer links without damaging them.
I would recommend that one use Moog brand for replacement links.

spugeddy
04-12-2010, 09:10 AM
I was under the van this weekend and grabbed hold of the stabilizer links (verticle bars attached to the shock?) and they are definatley making noise. The bushings (further back, to the rear) didn't appear to have any warping, or "air" between them and the metal, and the noise was coming from the verticle sway bar link....

SHould I pay someone to change both these areas.

I have the jacks, and jack stands, but don't want to get over my head if it is too much work.

old89lsc
04-12-2010, 07:21 PM
I don't know how hard it is, but if it turns out not too bad of a job in the driveway, please post it. Sooner or later I will have to replace mine and I would rather not pay for a job that isn't all that bad.

When I went to replace the struts my Haynes said that the steering knuckle would have to be removed. Well, I didn't really see going after that myself. I got a local Meineke to install the parts that I bought, saving me some money. I watched them do the job. It was easy; they put it on the lift, took off the wheels, and used an impact wrench to take off the bolts connected to the strut. The steering knuckles were left attached. I think that the whole thing was done in an hour by the two guys working on it. I felt like an idiot.

Whatever you decide, good luck.

northern piper
04-12-2010, 08:03 PM
the end links are easy. the hardest part is detaching the nuts that hold onto the strut and the sway bar. They're usually corroded and need some coaxing. Use lots of pb blaster. Once they're off, the new ones get put in. Pretty simple job.

wiswind
04-13-2010, 06:27 PM
I was lucky with my '96 windstar........needed new sway bar links.....but the sway bar bushings are still original and in good shape after over 220K miles.

spugeddy
04-14-2010, 08:44 AM
I think I am going to try to links, and see it that solves it.

I'll post pics, or DIY of it if I am successfull.

northern piper
04-14-2010, 03:01 PM
wow those are some bombproof sway bar bushings! I average about 25k on the ones I have! We must have even lousier roads than I thought!

wiswind
04-14-2010, 07:57 PM
I think it also depends on the replacement bushing that you get.
My '96 could have 1 of 2 different diameter sway bars.......VERY close in size.....so if you get the wrong size......they won't last.
Also.....it depends on the material used to manufacture the bushing.......some are better than others.

The other thing that I read.
You do NOT want to use oil or oil based grease on the bushings, as that will soften (break down) the bushing material.
You use a silicone based lubricant.......I was given Motorcraft "Mini-Vent Window Lube" when I gave them the Ford Specification number that I got from the alldata manual instructions for the sway bar link bushing replacement.
That stuff is SUPER slippery.

Those 3 reasons are enough to make me leave good OEM bushings alone......my luck....I would spoil a good thing.

spugeddy
04-18-2010, 06:58 AM
I bought the Moogs and am going to put them on today. I'll post later.

One link had the grease fitting lubed, but the other side looked dry.

Should I try to top it off with the silicone?

spugeddy
03-05-2011, 07:45 PM
I attached a grease fitting to the sway bar links and added some grease.

The clunking I was getting from these new links has gone away.

Windstartled
07-29-2012, 11:16 PM
if you aren't doing any tie rods than the alignment isn't necessary really. If you're doing the sway bar bushings and end links, the next thing is your lower control arms and tie rods. You may be looking at doing the whole thing. That's what I did last year and then got the alignment done. I was of the impression that within 6 months I'd be likely doing the rest anyway so while I had things apart..

How the f... did you manage to push the rear segment of the control arm into the bracket on the subframe? I just spent 4 hours trying to push, coax, kick, pry, hammer the dang bushing into the bracket but it just won't go and I'm just about to blow up! :banghead:

It looks as if one end of the bolt tunnel inside the bushing is protruding slightly on the left side. My first thought was to grind off the offending protrusion but thought I'd check in here first in case I'm missing something obvious, wouldn't be the first time. They are Moog units in case that's relevant.

BTW I just mailed your DVD, my memory was already lousy when I was 20 so imagine at 49 :redface:

northern piper
07-30-2012, 06:43 AM
thinking back about when I did my LCAs I know the fitment issue did come up. I recall installing the rear attachment point first, then hauling on it to get the front lined up. Then it was the "simple" task of attaching to hub area. I know it's a bit of a struggle but it does go, assuming the bracket hasn't been bent in some way..


oh, thanks for the dvd! I"ll keep my eyes open!

np

Windstartled
07-30-2012, 09:32 PM
thinking back about when I did my LCAs I know the fitment issue did come up. I recall installing the rear attachment point first, then hauling on it to get the front lined up. Then it was the "simple" task of attaching to hub area. I know it's a bit of a struggle but it does go, assuming the bracket hasn't been bent in some way..

I got the bastardhttp://www.opeonthenet.com/phpBB2/images/smilies/icon_025.gif

Took me all day, working in stifling heat and guzzling about 14 bottles of water (they were small bottles), not exactly the type of vacation I had in mind. Turns out that the best method of doing this is to partially engage the rear bushing in its bracket, then insert the big front bushing and insert the pin, which can only be pushed from the back. Not that easy having to poke around in that small opening in the subframe. Once the front bushing is securely pinned I noticed that the rear one seemed to be much more willing to enter the bracket when I lifted the arm from the balljoint end. In order to have both hands free I went to CT and bought a tiny hydraulic jack for ten bucks, put it on a block underneath the arm and pushed it up very gradually while tapping lightly on the arm with a dwarf hammer. When the height was right it popped in by itself. :)

northern piper
07-31-2012, 06:35 AM
I've always been of the impression that if you can't swear for 15 minutes straight without repeating yourself then you shouldn't be doing auto repairs...


glad you got it done!

Windstartled
07-31-2012, 11:41 PM
I've always been of the impression that if you can't swear for 15 minutes straight without repeating yourself then you shouldn't be doing auto repairs...


glad you got it done!

The upgrade yielded interesting results. Visually the most obvious change is that the front of the van now rides a full 5 inches higher than it used to and the vehicle is now perfectly horizontal. Goodbye low-rider and good riddance Since the strut assembly is the same height as the old one I can only surmise that the front springs on the old ones were terminally sagging under load. Another major improvement: that annoying camber is also gone, front wheels are now perfectly vertical. This is a widespread issue with 99-03 Winnies and now I'm convinced that the culprits are the lower arm assembly and more specifically the ball joint, both of mine were shot

Road test #1 was dissapointing, as soon as I hit about 10 mph a horrible grinding noise emanating from the right front wheel became apparent (the whole street could hear it). Back to my driveway, jack up the passenger corner, put the van in neutral, spinned the wheel by hand and sure enough chirp....chirp....chirp every second or so. Turns out the soft metal rotor shield had been slightly bent at the bottom during my project and was dragging against the rotor's edge. Pushed the shield back with a screwdriver, problem gone.

Road test #2 was much better. Just saying that the van handles better would be quite an understatement. I would say the handling is what Ford meant it to be when they redesigned the platform in '99 around a light truck frame instead of a car like the 95-98 models were. The result not surprisingly is that it handles like a mid-size SUV. You sit higher and the suspension is a bit on the firm side (when compared with a car or first-generation Winnie) but very stable on bumpy roads.

Gone are the metal clunks so now at last I can hear the mysterious muffled thuds many minivan owners complain about regardless of which brand/model they are driving. I am 99% convinced these come from the strut mount bushings and that the reason we minivan owners complain more about it is because we are almost sitting on the dang front wheels and there is not enough distance between the strut tower and the passenger cabin to dampen them properly. This low-level noise is not accompanied by any harshness so most people don't noticed them anymore, but me' I now hear them in almost any car I happen to be riding in.

northern piper
08-01-2012, 10:59 AM
5 inches!!??

wow that's a ton of height (or loss thereof) I'm sure your van rides much better now. Good job!!

Windstartled
08-02-2012, 08:07 AM
5 inches!!??

wow that's a ton of height (or loss thereof) I'm sure your van rides much better now. Good job!!

Yes, 5 inches. I knew front end was riding low so I took measurements before and after, but no measurements were needed to notice that spectacular growth. The ride is stellarly improved and with the center of gravity pushed further back it handles very well, even though I haven't had the alignment done yet. Just waiting 'til after I fix the brakes tomorrow if it's not too hot. I noticed one of the front brakes was dragging slightly but when I took the caliper apart I saw that the pistons' boots had disintegrated. Depressing the brake pedal caused one one of the pistons to pop out and brake fluid came out gushing, not good.

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